Limits...
Survival from prostate cancer in England and Wales up to 2001.

Rowan S, Rachet B, Alexe DM, Cooper N, Coleman MP - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office for National Statistics (Room 2000), Segensworth Road, Titchfield, Fareham, Hants PO15 5RR, UK.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Within the last 10 years, prostate cancer has become the most common malignancy among men in England and Wales... By the early 2000s, approximately 29 000 men were diagnosed each year with prostate cancer, accounting for one in four of all new cancers in men (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer)... The causes of prostate cancer are not well known... Family history in first-degree relatives is a risk factor, and incidence is 60% higher in African Americans and 38% lower in Asian Americans than in US Whites, but possible risk factors related to nutrition, environment, lifestyle, sexual history, occupation and ethnicity have not been conclusively identified... The proportion so described in England and Wales rose from just under 60% of all cases in the early 1990s to approximately 85% by the early 2000s, in parallel with a decline in the proportion coded as epithelial malignancy without further specification, from 28 to approximately 10% (data not shown)... Hybrid analysis based on the follow-up of survivors during 2000–2001 suggests that survival will continue to improve, but more slowly than over the previous decade, reaching 90% at 1 year and 70% at 5 years (Table 1)... Despite high overall survival, there is a significant deprivation gap in survival, which increased significantly during the 1990s (Figure 2)... Five-year survival for men in the most deprived groups who were diagnosed during 1996–1999 was some 7% lower than for men in the most affluent group (deprivation gap –7.2%)... This represents a significant widening of the deprivation gap by an average of −3.2% every 5 years since 1986–1990 (Table 2)... The recent trends in prostate cancer survival are remarkable... Survival improved by approximately 5–6% every 5 years between 1971–1975 and 1981–1985, but it did not change at all between the early and late 1980s... In the absence of widespread access to a substantially improved treatment for early prostate cancer in the last 15 years of the 20th century, it seems most likely that the extremely rapid improvement in recorded survival for men diagnosed with prostate cancer during the period 1986–1999 reflects an increase in the diagnosis, treatment and registration of men with asymptomatic malignancy as a result of the increasingly widespread use of PSA tests during the 1990s... Survival in the Nordic countries was high, and rose further during the 12 years up to 1994, with the exception of Denmark, where survival was lower and barely increased at all... As with the socioeconomic differences in the incidence and survival trends reported here, these patterns seem likely to be at least in part attributable to international differences in the intensity of diagnostic and screening activity... The randomised trials of mass screening for prostate cancer with the PSA test are not expected to report mortality results until 2010.

Show MeSH
Relative survival (%) up to 10 years after diagnosis by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001. Survival estimated with cohort or complete approach (1986–1990, 1991–1995, 1996–1999) or hybrid approach (2000–2001) (see Rachet et al, 2008).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2557548&req=5

fig1: Relative survival (%) up to 10 years after diagnosis by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001. Survival estimated with cohort or complete approach (1986–1990, 1991–1995, 1996–1999) or hybrid approach (2000–2001) (see Rachet et al, 2008).

Mentions: For men diagnosed during 1996–1999, 1-year survival rose to 89%, from 78% a decade or so earlier. This represents a rapid deprivation-adjusted increase of some 6% every 5 years since 1986–1990 (Table 1, Figure 1).


Survival from prostate cancer in England and Wales up to 2001.

Rowan S, Rachet B, Alexe DM, Cooper N, Coleman MP - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

Relative survival (%) up to 10 years after diagnosis by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001. Survival estimated with cohort or complete approach (1986–1990, 1991–1995, 1996–1999) or hybrid approach (2000–2001) (see Rachet et al, 2008).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2557548&req=5

fig1: Relative survival (%) up to 10 years after diagnosis by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001. Survival estimated with cohort or complete approach (1986–1990, 1991–1995, 1996–1999) or hybrid approach (2000–2001) (see Rachet et al, 2008).
Mentions: For men diagnosed during 1996–1999, 1-year survival rose to 89%, from 78% a decade or so earlier. This represents a rapid deprivation-adjusted increase of some 6% every 5 years since 1986–1990 (Table 1, Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office for National Statistics (Room 2000), Segensworth Road, Titchfield, Fareham, Hants PO15 5RR, UK.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Within the last 10 years, prostate cancer has become the most common malignancy among men in England and Wales... By the early 2000s, approximately 29 000 men were diagnosed each year with prostate cancer, accounting for one in four of all new cancers in men (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer)... The causes of prostate cancer are not well known... Family history in first-degree relatives is a risk factor, and incidence is 60% higher in African Americans and 38% lower in Asian Americans than in US Whites, but possible risk factors related to nutrition, environment, lifestyle, sexual history, occupation and ethnicity have not been conclusively identified... The proportion so described in England and Wales rose from just under 60% of all cases in the early 1990s to approximately 85% by the early 2000s, in parallel with a decline in the proportion coded as epithelial malignancy without further specification, from 28 to approximately 10% (data not shown)... Hybrid analysis based on the follow-up of survivors during 2000–2001 suggests that survival will continue to improve, but more slowly than over the previous decade, reaching 90% at 1 year and 70% at 5 years (Table 1)... Despite high overall survival, there is a significant deprivation gap in survival, which increased significantly during the 1990s (Figure 2)... Five-year survival for men in the most deprived groups who were diagnosed during 1996–1999 was some 7% lower than for men in the most affluent group (deprivation gap –7.2%)... This represents a significant widening of the deprivation gap by an average of −3.2% every 5 years since 1986–1990 (Table 2)... The recent trends in prostate cancer survival are remarkable... Survival improved by approximately 5–6% every 5 years between 1971–1975 and 1981–1985, but it did not change at all between the early and late 1980s... In the absence of widespread access to a substantially improved treatment for early prostate cancer in the last 15 years of the 20th century, it seems most likely that the extremely rapid improvement in recorded survival for men diagnosed with prostate cancer during the period 1986–1999 reflects an increase in the diagnosis, treatment and registration of men with asymptomatic malignancy as a result of the increasingly widespread use of PSA tests during the 1990s... Survival in the Nordic countries was high, and rose further during the 12 years up to 1994, with the exception of Denmark, where survival was lower and barely increased at all... As with the socioeconomic differences in the incidence and survival trends reported here, these patterns seem likely to be at least in part attributable to international differences in the intensity of diagnostic and screening activity... The randomised trials of mass screening for prostate cancer with the PSA test are not expected to report mortality results until 2010.

Show MeSH