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Survival from cancer of the larynx in England and Wales up to 2001.

Rachet B, Quinn MJ, Cooper N, Coleman MP - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group, Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK.

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Cancer of the larynx is one of the more common malignancies in England and Wales (ranking 20th in both sexes combined)... Geographic variation in risk is also wide, with incidence less than 70% of the United Kingdom and Ireland average in southwest England and parts of the southeast, but 50% or more above the average in much of Scotland and in the main urban areas of northwest and northeast England... The combined effect is a striking regional disparity in the socioeconomic profile of the disease... This has a direct impact on survival in men and women for all laryngeal cancers combined, because the main causal exposures and the most common anatomic location of tumours within the larynx differ between the sexes, as do their diagnosis, treatment and outcome... They tend to have higher survival than supraglottic tumours... Cancers of the supraglottis are more common in women and do not give rise to early symptoms of hoarseness... Some 20 000 men were diagnosed with a first, primary, invasive malignancy of the larynx in England and Wales during the period 1986–1999, and followed up to the end of 2001, approximately 89% of those eligible for analysis... Half (49%) of the laryngeal tumours diagnosed in men during the 1990s arose in the glottis (endolarynx), including the vocal cords... This rate of increase in survival is adjusted for the deprivation gap in survival and for any changes in the distribution of patients by deprivation category, and it is a more reliable estimate of the trend in survival than would appear from the very similar survival of 63–64% in successive calendar periods... Predicted survival derived from the hybrid approach using survival probabilities observed during 2000–2001 does not suggest any imminent increase in survival... Incidence trends in all socioeconomic groups were broadly parallel, showing a gentle and symmetrical increase, plateau and decline over the 14-year period 1986–1999 (Figure 3)... The incidence trends do not suggest an artefact of diagnosis or registration that might account for the different survival trends between socioeconomic groups... Further, the deprivation gap in 5-year survival for laryngeal cancer seen in men diagnosed during 1986–1990 (approximately −10%) had been fairly stable since the 1970s, so deaths from other tobacco-related causes cannot readily explain the increase in the deprivation gradient for relative survival from laryngeal cancer during the 1990s... Life tables that are specific to such a group are not available, but survival estimates made with approximate life tables for smokers, derived from a cohort study, do not suggest this could account for much of the difference in relative survival.

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Trends in the deprivation gap in 5-year relative survival (%) by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001.
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fig2: Trends in the deprivation gap in 5-year relative survival (%) by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001.

Mentions: Five-year survival was 17% lower (95% confidence interval 12–22% lower) among men diagnosed in the most deprived group in 1996–1999 than those in the most affluent group (Table 2, Figure 2). This is the steepest socioeconomic gradient in survival among all 20 common cancers that we examined, and it has widened more rapidly – by 3.7% every 5 years – than for any other cancer in men, even prostate cancer (q.v.). Figure 2 shows that virtually all the overall increase in 5-year survival between 1986–1990 and 1996–1999 occurred among the more affluent groups, while it stagnated or even fell slightly amongst men in the more deprived groups.


Survival from cancer of the larynx in England and Wales up to 2001.

Rachet B, Quinn MJ, Cooper N, Coleman MP - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

Trends in the deprivation gap in 5-year relative survival (%) by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2557544&req=5

fig2: Trends in the deprivation gap in 5-year relative survival (%) by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001.
Mentions: Five-year survival was 17% lower (95% confidence interval 12–22% lower) among men diagnosed in the most deprived group in 1996–1999 than those in the most affluent group (Table 2, Figure 2). This is the steepest socioeconomic gradient in survival among all 20 common cancers that we examined, and it has widened more rapidly – by 3.7% every 5 years – than for any other cancer in men, even prostate cancer (q.v.). Figure 2 shows that virtually all the overall increase in 5-year survival between 1986–1990 and 1996–1999 occurred among the more affluent groups, while it stagnated or even fell slightly amongst men in the more deprived groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group, Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Cancer of the larynx is one of the more common malignancies in England and Wales (ranking 20th in both sexes combined)... Geographic variation in risk is also wide, with incidence less than 70% of the United Kingdom and Ireland average in southwest England and parts of the southeast, but 50% or more above the average in much of Scotland and in the main urban areas of northwest and northeast England... The combined effect is a striking regional disparity in the socioeconomic profile of the disease... This has a direct impact on survival in men and women for all laryngeal cancers combined, because the main causal exposures and the most common anatomic location of tumours within the larynx differ between the sexes, as do their diagnosis, treatment and outcome... They tend to have higher survival than supraglottic tumours... Cancers of the supraglottis are more common in women and do not give rise to early symptoms of hoarseness... Some 20 000 men were diagnosed with a first, primary, invasive malignancy of the larynx in England and Wales during the period 1986–1999, and followed up to the end of 2001, approximately 89% of those eligible for analysis... Half (49%) of the laryngeal tumours diagnosed in men during the 1990s arose in the glottis (endolarynx), including the vocal cords... This rate of increase in survival is adjusted for the deprivation gap in survival and for any changes in the distribution of patients by deprivation category, and it is a more reliable estimate of the trend in survival than would appear from the very similar survival of 63–64% in successive calendar periods... Predicted survival derived from the hybrid approach using survival probabilities observed during 2000–2001 does not suggest any imminent increase in survival... Incidence trends in all socioeconomic groups were broadly parallel, showing a gentle and symmetrical increase, plateau and decline over the 14-year period 1986–1999 (Figure 3)... The incidence trends do not suggest an artefact of diagnosis or registration that might account for the different survival trends between socioeconomic groups... Further, the deprivation gap in 5-year survival for laryngeal cancer seen in men diagnosed during 1986–1990 (approximately −10%) had been fairly stable since the 1970s, so deaths from other tobacco-related causes cannot readily explain the increase in the deprivation gradient for relative survival from laryngeal cancer during the 1990s... Life tables that are specific to such a group are not available, but survival estimates made with approximate life tables for smokers, derived from a cohort study, do not suggest this could account for much of the difference in relative survival.

Show MeSH