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Survival from cancer of the uterine cervix in England and Wales up to 2001.

Quinn MJ, Cooper N, Rachet B, Mitry E, Woods LM, Coleman MP - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Social and Health Analysis and Reporting Division, Office for National Statistics (Room FG/114), 1 Myddelton Street, London EC1R 1UW, UK.

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We analysed the data for 44 090 women diagnosed with invasive cancer of the uterine cervix in England and Wales during the 14-year period 1986–1999, some 90% of those eligible for inclusion in the analyses... Approximately 4% of women otherwise eligible for analysis were excluded with zero recorded survival (date of diagnosis same as date of death)... The proportion of women for whom recorded survival was zero did not vary between socioeconomic groups, however, and it was stable throughout the 1990s (data not shown)... Five-year survival improved more rapidly, by more than 3% every 5 years, to reach 64% by the same period... In the 1990s, by contrast, 1-year and 5-year survival did not increase significantly, remaining at 85.5 and 65.5%, respectively (Table 1, Figure 2)... During the 1970s and 1980s, relative survival from cervical cancer in England and Wales was consistently some 4–8% lower for women living in deprived areas than for those in more affluent areas... This deprivation gap did not appear to be accounted for by differences in stage at diagnosis... Following improvements to the cervical screening programme in the late 1980s, the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and the death rate both fell sharply – but survival from cervical cancer has not improved further during the 1990s, and there is no evidence that any increase can be expected in the near future... If the steady improvements in survival seen in the 1970s and 1980s did in fact continue for women diagnosed at each stage of disease during the 1990s, then the absence of any observed trend in overall survival (all stages of disease combined) may have been attributable to changes in the distribution of age or stage at diagnosis... In most women, effective treatment of carcinoma in situ would have prevented progression of the disease to invasive cancer: in that sense, cervical screening can actually prevent the development of invasive cancer that would otherwise have arisen... Women with carcinoma in situ, predominantly young women, were not included in these analyses, and the overall survival trends for women aged 15–99 years, who were ultimately diagnosed with invasive cancer, did not change significantly by standardisation for age (data not shown here)... The spectrum of stage at diagnosis of invasive cancer may have shifted towards more advanced cases, as a result of continuing improvement in the screening programme... The need for high-quality data on stage of diagnosis to enable adequate evaluation of national trends in cancer survival is obvious, but those data can only be captured by cancer registries if the relevant information is systematically recorded in the medical record for all cancer patients... The decline in the incidence and mortality of invasive cervical cancer is a very welcome result of improved cervical screening.

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Relative survival (%) up to 10 years after diagnosis by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001. Survival estimated with cohort or complete approach (1986–1990, 1991–1995, 1996–1999) or hybrid approach (2000–2001) (See Rachet et al, 2008).
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fig2: Relative survival (%) up to 10 years after diagnosis by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001. Survival estimated with cohort or complete approach (1986–1990, 1991–1995, 1996–1999) or hybrid approach (2000–2001) (See Rachet et al, 2008).

Mentions: In the 1990s, by contrast, 1-year and 5-year survival did not increase significantly, remaining at 85.5 and 65.5%, respectively (Table 1, Figure 2). The small average increase in 1-year survival (0.5% every 5 years) is adjusted for the deprivation gap in survival and for changes in the distribution of patients by deprivation category (see above). It is a more reliable estimate of trend than would appear from the unchanging estimates of 83.5% in successive calendar periods, although the rate of increase in survival is not statistically significant.


Survival from cancer of the uterine cervix in England and Wales up to 2001.

Quinn MJ, Cooper N, Rachet B, Mitry E, Woods LM, Coleman MP - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

Relative survival (%) up to 10 years after diagnosis by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001. Survival estimated with cohort or complete approach (1986–1990, 1991–1995, 1996–1999) or hybrid approach (2000–2001) (See Rachet et al, 2008).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2557535&req=5

fig2: Relative survival (%) up to 10 years after diagnosis by calendar period of diagnosis: England and Wales, adults (15–99 years) diagnosed during 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001. Survival estimated with cohort or complete approach (1986–1990, 1991–1995, 1996–1999) or hybrid approach (2000–2001) (See Rachet et al, 2008).
Mentions: In the 1990s, by contrast, 1-year and 5-year survival did not increase significantly, remaining at 85.5 and 65.5%, respectively (Table 1, Figure 2). The small average increase in 1-year survival (0.5% every 5 years) is adjusted for the deprivation gap in survival and for changes in the distribution of patients by deprivation category (see above). It is a more reliable estimate of trend than would appear from the unchanging estimates of 83.5% in successive calendar periods, although the rate of increase in survival is not statistically significant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Social and Health Analysis and Reporting Division, Office for National Statistics (Room FG/114), 1 Myddelton Street, London EC1R 1UW, UK.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

We analysed the data for 44 090 women diagnosed with invasive cancer of the uterine cervix in England and Wales during the 14-year period 1986–1999, some 90% of those eligible for inclusion in the analyses... Approximately 4% of women otherwise eligible for analysis were excluded with zero recorded survival (date of diagnosis same as date of death)... The proportion of women for whom recorded survival was zero did not vary between socioeconomic groups, however, and it was stable throughout the 1990s (data not shown)... Five-year survival improved more rapidly, by more than 3% every 5 years, to reach 64% by the same period... In the 1990s, by contrast, 1-year and 5-year survival did not increase significantly, remaining at 85.5 and 65.5%, respectively (Table 1, Figure 2)... During the 1970s and 1980s, relative survival from cervical cancer in England and Wales was consistently some 4–8% lower for women living in deprived areas than for those in more affluent areas... This deprivation gap did not appear to be accounted for by differences in stage at diagnosis... Following improvements to the cervical screening programme in the late 1980s, the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and the death rate both fell sharply – but survival from cervical cancer has not improved further during the 1990s, and there is no evidence that any increase can be expected in the near future... If the steady improvements in survival seen in the 1970s and 1980s did in fact continue for women diagnosed at each stage of disease during the 1990s, then the absence of any observed trend in overall survival (all stages of disease combined) may have been attributable to changes in the distribution of age or stage at diagnosis... In most women, effective treatment of carcinoma in situ would have prevented progression of the disease to invasive cancer: in that sense, cervical screening can actually prevent the development of invasive cancer that would otherwise have arisen... Women with carcinoma in situ, predominantly young women, were not included in these analyses, and the overall survival trends for women aged 15–99 years, who were ultimately diagnosed with invasive cancer, did not change significantly by standardisation for age (data not shown here)... The spectrum of stage at diagnosis of invasive cancer may have shifted towards more advanced cases, as a result of continuing improvement in the screening programme... The need for high-quality data on stage of diagnosis to enable adequate evaluation of national trends in cancer survival is obvious, but those data can only be captured by cancer registries if the relevant information is systematically recorded in the medical record for all cancer patients... The decline in the incidence and mortality of invasive cervical cancer is a very welcome result of improved cervical screening.

Show MeSH