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Survival from cancer of the stomach in England and Wales up to 2001.

Mitry E, Rachet B, Quinn MJ, Cooper N, Coleman MP - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

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Affiliation: Département d'Hépatogastroentérologie et Oncologie Digestive, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Ambroise-Paré, 9 avenue Charles de Gaulle, F-92100 Boulogne, France.

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The steady, long-term decline in stomach cancer incidence and mortality has seen its relative frequency in England and Wales fall from 5% of all malignant neoplasms in the 1970s to 2.3% by 2002... The shift towards more cardiac tumours may affect overall survival, because proximal tumours of the stomach tend to be more difficult to remove... Survival has been increasing steadily and significantly... One-year survival in men rose from 26.6% for those diagnosed during 1986–1999 to 33.5% for those diagnosed during 1996–1999 (Figure 2)... The fitted, deprivation-adjusted average increase of 4.7% every 5 years was statistically significant (Table 1)... The increase in 5-year survival was less marked, but still statistically significant: it rose to 12.9% for men diagnosed at the end of the 1990 s (+2.0% every 5 years) and 14.0% for women (+1.7% every 5 years)... Ten-year survival for those diagnosed during 1991–1995 was 9–10%, not much less than the 5-year survival rate, suggesting that most of the excess mortality in stomach cancer patients occurs in the first 5 years... No clear trend in the deprivation gap was seen for women... The significant improvement in stomach cancer survival in England and Wales since 1990 continues the trend observed since the early 1970s... One-year survival improved more rapidly in the 1990s (4–5% every 5 years) than in the 1970s and 1980s (2% every 5 years), whereas improvements in longer-term survival have slowed down... Gains in 5-year survival for patients diagnosed in the 1990s (2% every 5 years) were notably smaller than in the two previous decades (4% every 5 years)... This pattern probably reflects recent improvements in perioperative mortality... The widening of the deprivation gap in men could suggest that men in the most deprived group have not benefited from this reduction in operative mortality.

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Trends in the age-standardised incidence of stomach cancer in adults aged 15–99 years, by sex and deprivation group: England and Wales, 1986–1999.
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fig1: Trends in the age-standardised incidence of stomach cancer in adults aged 15–99 years, by sex and deprivation group: England and Wales, 1986–1999.

Mentions: The steady, long-term decline in stomach cancer incidence and mortality has seen its relative frequency in England and Wales fall from 5% of all malignant neoplasms in the 1970s to 2.3% by 2002 (Coleman et al, 1993; Cooper et al, 2005). It is now only the sixth most common cancer in men and the tenth most common in women. The decline in incidence is probably related to changes in diet and nutrition, improved preservation of food and a reduction in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and in tobacco smoking (Parkin, 2001). Incidence is higher in men (sex ratio about 2.5 to 1), in the north of England, and in more deprived socioeconomic groups (Coleman et al, 1999). In the late 1990s, incidence was still 1.35 times higher in the most deprived socioeconomic group than in the most affluent, but this ratio was lower than in the early 1990s (1.41), because incidence fell by about 9% in the most deprived group over this decade, slightly faster than in the most affluent groups (Figure 1).


Survival from cancer of the stomach in England and Wales up to 2001.

Mitry E, Rachet B, Quinn MJ, Cooper N, Coleman MP - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

Trends in the age-standardised incidence of stomach cancer in adults aged 15–99 years, by sex and deprivation group: England and Wales, 1986–1999.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2557534&req=5

fig1: Trends in the age-standardised incidence of stomach cancer in adults aged 15–99 years, by sex and deprivation group: England and Wales, 1986–1999.
Mentions: The steady, long-term decline in stomach cancer incidence and mortality has seen its relative frequency in England and Wales fall from 5% of all malignant neoplasms in the 1970s to 2.3% by 2002 (Coleman et al, 1993; Cooper et al, 2005). It is now only the sixth most common cancer in men and the tenth most common in women. The decline in incidence is probably related to changes in diet and nutrition, improved preservation of food and a reduction in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and in tobacco smoking (Parkin, 2001). Incidence is higher in men (sex ratio about 2.5 to 1), in the north of England, and in more deprived socioeconomic groups (Coleman et al, 1999). In the late 1990s, incidence was still 1.35 times higher in the most deprived socioeconomic group than in the most affluent, but this ratio was lower than in the early 1990s (1.41), because incidence fell by about 9% in the most deprived group over this decade, slightly faster than in the most affluent groups (Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Département d'Hépatogastroentérologie et Oncologie Digestive, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Ambroise-Paré, 9 avenue Charles de Gaulle, F-92100 Boulogne, France.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The steady, long-term decline in stomach cancer incidence and mortality has seen its relative frequency in England and Wales fall from 5% of all malignant neoplasms in the 1970s to 2.3% by 2002... The shift towards more cardiac tumours may affect overall survival, because proximal tumours of the stomach tend to be more difficult to remove... Survival has been increasing steadily and significantly... One-year survival in men rose from 26.6% for those diagnosed during 1986–1999 to 33.5% for those diagnosed during 1996–1999 (Figure 2)... The fitted, deprivation-adjusted average increase of 4.7% every 5 years was statistically significant (Table 1)... The increase in 5-year survival was less marked, but still statistically significant: it rose to 12.9% for men diagnosed at the end of the 1990 s (+2.0% every 5 years) and 14.0% for women (+1.7% every 5 years)... Ten-year survival for those diagnosed during 1991–1995 was 9–10%, not much less than the 5-year survival rate, suggesting that most of the excess mortality in stomach cancer patients occurs in the first 5 years... No clear trend in the deprivation gap was seen for women... The significant improvement in stomach cancer survival in England and Wales since 1990 continues the trend observed since the early 1970s... One-year survival improved more rapidly in the 1990s (4–5% every 5 years) than in the 1970s and 1980s (2% every 5 years), whereas improvements in longer-term survival have slowed down... Gains in 5-year survival for patients diagnosed in the 1990s (2% every 5 years) were notably smaller than in the two previous decades (4% every 5 years)... This pattern probably reflects recent improvements in perioperative mortality... The widening of the deprivation gap in men could suggest that men in the most deprived group have not benefited from this reduction in operative mortality.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus