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Ultrasonographically detected gallbladder polyps: a reason for concern? A seven-year follow-up study.

Kratzer W, Haenle MM, Voegtle A, Mason RA, Akinli AS, Hirschbuehl K, Schuler A, Kaechele V, Roemerstein Study Gro - BMC Gastroenterol (2008)

Bottom Line: Median diameter was 5 +/- 2.1 mm (range 2 to 10 mm) at the initial survey, 5 mm +/- 2.8 mm (range 2 to 12 mm) at 30 months and 4 +/- 2.3 mm (range 2 to 9 mm) at 84 months.At the time of first follow-up no change in diameter was found in 81.0% (n = 17), reduction in diameter in 4.8% (n = 1) and increase in diameter in 14.3% (n = 3).No evidence of malignant disease of the gallbladder was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Zentrum für Innere Medizin, Klinik für Innere Medizin I, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Robert-Koch-Str, 8, 89081 Ulm, Germany. wolfgang.kratzer@uniklinik-ulm.de

ABSTRACT

Background: The management of coincidental detected gallbladder polyps (GP) is still nebulous. There are few published data regarding their long-term growth. Objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and growth of gallbladder polyps in a survey of unselected subjects from the general population of a complete rural community.

Methods: A total of 2,415 subjects (1,261 women; 1,154 men) underwent ultrasound examination of the gallbladder, in November 1996 as part of a prospective study. Subjects in whom GP were detected at the initial survey underwent follow-up ultrasound examinations after 30 and 84 months.

Results: At the initial survey gallbladder polyps were detected in 34 subjects (1.4%; females: 1.1%, range 14 to 74 years; males: 1.7%, range 19 to 63 years). Median diameter was 5 +/- 2.1 mm (range 2 to 10 mm) at the initial survey, 5 mm +/- 2.8 mm (range 2 to 12 mm) at 30 months and 4 +/- 2.3 mm (range 2 to 9 mm) at 84 months. At the time of first follow-up no change in diameter was found in 81.0% (n = 17), reduction in diameter in 4.8% (n = 1) and increase in diameter in 14.3% (n = 3). At the time of second follow-up no increase in polyp diameter was found in 76.9% (n = 10) and reduction in diameter in 7.7% (n = 1). No evidence of malignant disease of the gallbladder was found.

Conclusion: Over a period of seven years little change was measured in the diameter of gallbladder polyps. There was no evidence of malignant disease of the gallbladder in any subject.

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Changes in gallbladder polyps (GP) between 1996 and 1999 and between 1996 and 2003.
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Figure 3: Changes in gallbladder polyps (GP) between 1996 and 1999 and between 1996 and 2003.

Mentions: With respect to diameter, the majority of polyps showed no change at either the first (1999) or second (2003) follow-up examination. In 1999, polyp diameter remained constant in 81% (17/21) of subjects, with one person (5%) exhibiting reduction in the size of his polyp and three persons (14%) showing size progression (figure 3). A comparison of size progression between 1999 and 2003 shows that 91% (10/11) of polyps remained constant, one became smaller (1/11; 9%) but none became larger. Over the entire 84-month period 62% (8/13) of polyps showed no change in size, 15% (2/13) became smaller and 23% (3/13) became larger. Thus, our results lie between data published by Moriguchi and Sugiyama on the one hand and those of Csendes on the other [13,17,18]. Over an observation period of five years, Moriguchi et al. found an increase in polyp diameter in 11.7% (12/103), while in 84.5% (87/103), polyp size remained constant. Conversely, Csendes et al., who followed subjects for an average 71%, found no change in polyp diameter in 50% of subjects while an increase or decrease in diameter was observed in 25% each (table 1) [13,17].


Ultrasonographically detected gallbladder polyps: a reason for concern? A seven-year follow-up study.

Kratzer W, Haenle MM, Voegtle A, Mason RA, Akinli AS, Hirschbuehl K, Schuler A, Kaechele V, Roemerstein Study Gro - BMC Gastroenterol (2008)

Changes in gallbladder polyps (GP) between 1996 and 1999 and between 1996 and 2003.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2553794&req=5

Figure 3: Changes in gallbladder polyps (GP) between 1996 and 1999 and between 1996 and 2003.
Mentions: With respect to diameter, the majority of polyps showed no change at either the first (1999) or second (2003) follow-up examination. In 1999, polyp diameter remained constant in 81% (17/21) of subjects, with one person (5%) exhibiting reduction in the size of his polyp and three persons (14%) showing size progression (figure 3). A comparison of size progression between 1999 and 2003 shows that 91% (10/11) of polyps remained constant, one became smaller (1/11; 9%) but none became larger. Over the entire 84-month period 62% (8/13) of polyps showed no change in size, 15% (2/13) became smaller and 23% (3/13) became larger. Thus, our results lie between data published by Moriguchi and Sugiyama on the one hand and those of Csendes on the other [13,17,18]. Over an observation period of five years, Moriguchi et al. found an increase in polyp diameter in 11.7% (12/103), while in 84.5% (87/103), polyp size remained constant. Conversely, Csendes et al., who followed subjects for an average 71%, found no change in polyp diameter in 50% of subjects while an increase or decrease in diameter was observed in 25% each (table 1) [13,17].

Bottom Line: Median diameter was 5 +/- 2.1 mm (range 2 to 10 mm) at the initial survey, 5 mm +/- 2.8 mm (range 2 to 12 mm) at 30 months and 4 +/- 2.3 mm (range 2 to 9 mm) at 84 months.At the time of first follow-up no change in diameter was found in 81.0% (n = 17), reduction in diameter in 4.8% (n = 1) and increase in diameter in 14.3% (n = 3).No evidence of malignant disease of the gallbladder was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Zentrum für Innere Medizin, Klinik für Innere Medizin I, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Robert-Koch-Str, 8, 89081 Ulm, Germany. wolfgang.kratzer@uniklinik-ulm.de

ABSTRACT

Background: The management of coincidental detected gallbladder polyps (GP) is still nebulous. There are few published data regarding their long-term growth. Objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and growth of gallbladder polyps in a survey of unselected subjects from the general population of a complete rural community.

Methods: A total of 2,415 subjects (1,261 women; 1,154 men) underwent ultrasound examination of the gallbladder, in November 1996 as part of a prospective study. Subjects in whom GP were detected at the initial survey underwent follow-up ultrasound examinations after 30 and 84 months.

Results: At the initial survey gallbladder polyps were detected in 34 subjects (1.4%; females: 1.1%, range 14 to 74 years; males: 1.7%, range 19 to 63 years). Median diameter was 5 +/- 2.1 mm (range 2 to 10 mm) at the initial survey, 5 mm +/- 2.8 mm (range 2 to 12 mm) at 30 months and 4 +/- 2.3 mm (range 2 to 9 mm) at 84 months. At the time of first follow-up no change in diameter was found in 81.0% (n = 17), reduction in diameter in 4.8% (n = 1) and increase in diameter in 14.3% (n = 3). At the time of second follow-up no increase in polyp diameter was found in 76.9% (n = 10) and reduction in diameter in 7.7% (n = 1). No evidence of malignant disease of the gallbladder was found.

Conclusion: Over a period of seven years little change was measured in the diameter of gallbladder polyps. There was no evidence of malignant disease of the gallbladder in any subject.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus