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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infected pseudo-arthrosis of the distal tibia treated with debridement, mesh cage, autologous grafting and locking plate fixation.

Motsitsi SN - Strategies Trauma Limb Reconstr (2008)

Bottom Line: It has a high morbidity and mortality.Treatment is very demanding and has a significant complication rate.The outcome was satisfactory despite residual limb deformity and discrepancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kalafong Hospital, University of Pretoria, Private Bag x 396, Pretoria, South Africa, silas.motsitsi@up.ac.za.

ABSTRACT
Infected non-union of long bones is a challenge to manage. It has a high morbidity and mortality. Treatment is very demanding and has a significant complication rate. Methicillin-resistant infected non-union has a higher morbidity and mortality compared to Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. Approximately half of all Staphylococci isolated in infected orthopaedic operations are caused by Methicillin-resistant S. aureus. We present a 42-year-old patient who had Methicillin-resistant S. aureus infected pseudo-arthrosis of the tibia that was treated with debridement, mesh cage, autologous bone-grafting, and plating of the tibia. The outcome was satisfactory despite residual limb deformity and discrepancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The defect in the tibia is managed with titanium cage packed with autologous bone graft. The construct is stabilized with a locking plate
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Fig2: The defect in the tibia is managed with titanium cage packed with autologous bone graft. The construct is stabilized with a locking plate

Mentions: A one-stage surgical strategy was adopted: local debridement of the dead bone and soft tissue, removal of implant, repeat of microscopy, culture and sensitivity, filling of tibial defect with a mesh cage packed with 2.0 g of vancomycin-impregnated autologous bone-graft and stabilization of the tibia with locking plate (Fig. 2). The approach was lateral. The plate was placed laterally. No tibial or fibular shortening was necessary. The skin was closed primarily. The procedure was uneventful.Fig. 2


Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infected pseudo-arthrosis of the distal tibia treated with debridement, mesh cage, autologous grafting and locking plate fixation.

Motsitsi SN - Strategies Trauma Limb Reconstr (2008)

The defect in the tibia is managed with titanium cage packed with autologous bone graft. The construct is stabilized with a locking plate
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2553432&req=5

Fig2: The defect in the tibia is managed with titanium cage packed with autologous bone graft. The construct is stabilized with a locking plate
Mentions: A one-stage surgical strategy was adopted: local debridement of the dead bone and soft tissue, removal of implant, repeat of microscopy, culture and sensitivity, filling of tibial defect with a mesh cage packed with 2.0 g of vancomycin-impregnated autologous bone-graft and stabilization of the tibia with locking plate (Fig. 2). The approach was lateral. The plate was placed laterally. No tibial or fibular shortening was necessary. The skin was closed primarily. The procedure was uneventful.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: It has a high morbidity and mortality.Treatment is very demanding and has a significant complication rate.The outcome was satisfactory despite residual limb deformity and discrepancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kalafong Hospital, University of Pretoria, Private Bag x 396, Pretoria, South Africa, silas.motsitsi@up.ac.za.

ABSTRACT
Infected non-union of long bones is a challenge to manage. It has a high morbidity and mortality. Treatment is very demanding and has a significant complication rate. Methicillin-resistant infected non-union has a higher morbidity and mortality compared to Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. Approximately half of all Staphylococci isolated in infected orthopaedic operations are caused by Methicillin-resistant S. aureus. We present a 42-year-old patient who had Methicillin-resistant S. aureus infected pseudo-arthrosis of the tibia that was treated with debridement, mesh cage, autologous bone-grafting, and plating of the tibia. The outcome was satisfactory despite residual limb deformity and discrepancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus