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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infected pseudo-arthrosis of the distal tibia treated with debridement, mesh cage, autologous grafting and locking plate fixation.

Motsitsi SN - Strategies Trauma Limb Reconstr (2008)

Bottom Line: It has a high morbidity and mortality.Treatment is very demanding and has a significant complication rate.The outcome was satisfactory despite residual limb deformity and discrepancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kalafong Hospital, University of Pretoria, Private Bag x 396, Pretoria, South Africa, silas.motsitsi@up.ac.za.

ABSTRACT
Infected non-union of long bones is a challenge to manage. It has a high morbidity and mortality. Treatment is very demanding and has a significant complication rate. Methicillin-resistant infected non-union has a higher morbidity and mortality compared to Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. Approximately half of all Staphylococci isolated in infected orthopaedic operations are caused by Methicillin-resistant S. aureus. We present a 42-year-old patient who had Methicillin-resistant S. aureus infected pseudo-arthrosis of the tibia that was treated with debridement, mesh cage, autologous bone-grafting, and plating of the tibia. The outcome was satisfactory despite residual limb deformity and discrepancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pre-operative radiograph shows tibial defect, sclerotic ends of the tibia and failing fibular implant
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Fig1: Pre-operative radiograph shows tibial defect, sclerotic ends of the tibia and failing fibular implant

Mentions: Plain radiographs of the leg showed a 2.0 cm of tibial defect, sclerotic bone ends, no sequestrum, and plated distal fibula. The screws were loose (Fig. 1). No any other investigations were deemed necessary.Fig. 1


Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infected pseudo-arthrosis of the distal tibia treated with debridement, mesh cage, autologous grafting and locking plate fixation.

Motsitsi SN - Strategies Trauma Limb Reconstr (2008)

Pre-operative radiograph shows tibial defect, sclerotic ends of the tibia and failing fibular implant
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2553432&req=5

Fig1: Pre-operative radiograph shows tibial defect, sclerotic ends of the tibia and failing fibular implant
Mentions: Plain radiographs of the leg showed a 2.0 cm of tibial defect, sclerotic bone ends, no sequestrum, and plated distal fibula. The screws were loose (Fig. 1). No any other investigations were deemed necessary.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: It has a high morbidity and mortality.Treatment is very demanding and has a significant complication rate.The outcome was satisfactory despite residual limb deformity and discrepancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kalafong Hospital, University of Pretoria, Private Bag x 396, Pretoria, South Africa, silas.motsitsi@up.ac.za.

ABSTRACT
Infected non-union of long bones is a challenge to manage. It has a high morbidity and mortality. Treatment is very demanding and has a significant complication rate. Methicillin-resistant infected non-union has a higher morbidity and mortality compared to Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. Approximately half of all Staphylococci isolated in infected orthopaedic operations are caused by Methicillin-resistant S. aureus. We present a 42-year-old patient who had Methicillin-resistant S. aureus infected pseudo-arthrosis of the tibia that was treated with debridement, mesh cage, autologous bone-grafting, and plating of the tibia. The outcome was satisfactory despite residual limb deformity and discrepancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus