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Bioelectrical phase angle values in a clinical sample of ambulatory rehabilitation patients.

Gunn SM, Halbert JA, Giles LC, Stepien JM, Miller MD, Crotty M - Dyn Med (2008)

Bottom Line: Stroke patients had the highest PhA (5.3 degrees) followed by elective orthopaedic surgery (5.0 degrees) with the other group (4.3 degrees) significantly lower than both previous categories (p < 0.001).Patients with CRP values less than 10 mg.L-1 had significantly (p = 0.005) higher mean PhA values.Furthermore, the highest functional status quartiles had significantly higher PhAs (p < or = 0.04) for the FIM, MQS and TUG measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Flinders University Department of Rehabilitation and Aged Care, Repatriation General Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. simon.gunn@flinders.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Background: Phase angle (PhA) is derived from the resistance and reactance measurements obtained from bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) and is considered indicative of cellular health and membrane integrity. This study measured PhA values of rehabilitation patients and compared them to reference values, measures of functional ability and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels to explore their utility as a clinical tool to monitor disease progression and treatment efficacy.

Methods: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted on 215 ambulatory rehabilitation patients aged 20 - 94 years. All participants had been hospitalised for a stroke, orthopaedic or other condition resulting in a functional limitation. PhA was derived from BIA analysis and functional ability characterised using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), timed up and go (TUG) and maximal quadriceps strength (MQS). Serum levels of CRP were also collected.

Results: Stroke patients had the highest PhA (5.3 degrees) followed by elective orthopaedic surgery (5.0 degrees) with the other group (4.3 degrees) significantly lower than both previous categories (p < 0.001). Ambulatory rehabilitation patients' PhA values were dependent on age and sex (p < 0.001), lower than published age matched healthy reference values (p < or = 0.05) and similar to other hospitalised or sick groups, but also higher than values reported in critically ill patients. Patients with CRP values less than 10 mg.L-1 had significantly (p = 0.005) higher mean PhA values. Furthermore, the highest functional status quartiles had significantly higher PhAs (p < or = 0.04) for the FIM, MQS and TUG measures.

Conclusion: The results suggest that the phase angles of rehabilitation patients are between those of healthy individuals and seriously ill patients, thereby supporting claims that PhA is indicative of general health status. Phase angles are a potentially useful indicator of functional status in patients commencing an ambulatory rehabilitation program with a normal hydration status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phase angle by C-reactive protein classification (A), Timed Up-and-Go (B), Functional Independence Measure (C) and maximum quadriceps strength (D) quartiles (error bars represent ± 95% confidence interval of the mean).
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Figure 1: Phase angle by C-reactive protein classification (A), Timed Up-and-Go (B), Functional Independence Measure (C) and maximum quadriceps strength (D) quartiles (error bars represent ± 95% confidence interval of the mean).

Mentions: Phase angle showed modest but significant (p < 0.01) correlations with maximum quadriceps strength (0.3), FIM (0.3), age (-0.4) and length of acute hospital stay (-0.3). However, there was no significant association with CRP (0.1), BMI (0.1), MBI (0.1) or TUG (0.1). These correlations also tended to be higher in men compared with women (data not shown). Further analyses revealed that patients with CRP values less than 10 mg.L-1 had significantly (p = 0.005) higher mean PhA values (5.0°) than those with CRP greater than 10 mg.L-1 (4.6°; Figure 1). Furthermore, when the sample was divided into quartiles based on the various functional measures, the fourth quartile (i.e. highest values) had significantly higher PhAs than the other three quartiles (p ≤ 0.04) for the FIM and quadriceps strength measures and a significantly lower PhA than the first quartile (p ≤ 0.001) for TUG (Figure 1). These trends remained when the confounding influence of sex was removed. There was no significant difference between any quartile for MBI. PhA also showed a generally decreasing trend with length of acute hospital stay where the fourth quartile (longest stay) had significantly lower values than the first (shortest stay: p = 0.001) and third quartiles (p = 0.03).


Bioelectrical phase angle values in a clinical sample of ambulatory rehabilitation patients.

Gunn SM, Halbert JA, Giles LC, Stepien JM, Miller MD, Crotty M - Dyn Med (2008)

Phase angle by C-reactive protein classification (A), Timed Up-and-Go (B), Functional Independence Measure (C) and maximum quadriceps strength (D) quartiles (error bars represent ± 95% confidence interval of the mean).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2551587&req=5

Figure 1: Phase angle by C-reactive protein classification (A), Timed Up-and-Go (B), Functional Independence Measure (C) and maximum quadriceps strength (D) quartiles (error bars represent ± 95% confidence interval of the mean).
Mentions: Phase angle showed modest but significant (p < 0.01) correlations with maximum quadriceps strength (0.3), FIM (0.3), age (-0.4) and length of acute hospital stay (-0.3). However, there was no significant association with CRP (0.1), BMI (0.1), MBI (0.1) or TUG (0.1). These correlations also tended to be higher in men compared with women (data not shown). Further analyses revealed that patients with CRP values less than 10 mg.L-1 had significantly (p = 0.005) higher mean PhA values (5.0°) than those with CRP greater than 10 mg.L-1 (4.6°; Figure 1). Furthermore, when the sample was divided into quartiles based on the various functional measures, the fourth quartile (i.e. highest values) had significantly higher PhAs than the other three quartiles (p ≤ 0.04) for the FIM and quadriceps strength measures and a significantly lower PhA than the first quartile (p ≤ 0.001) for TUG (Figure 1). These trends remained when the confounding influence of sex was removed. There was no significant difference between any quartile for MBI. PhA also showed a generally decreasing trend with length of acute hospital stay where the fourth quartile (longest stay) had significantly lower values than the first (shortest stay: p = 0.001) and third quartiles (p = 0.03).

Bottom Line: Stroke patients had the highest PhA (5.3 degrees) followed by elective orthopaedic surgery (5.0 degrees) with the other group (4.3 degrees) significantly lower than both previous categories (p < 0.001).Patients with CRP values less than 10 mg.L-1 had significantly (p = 0.005) higher mean PhA values.Furthermore, the highest functional status quartiles had significantly higher PhAs (p < or = 0.04) for the FIM, MQS and TUG measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Flinders University Department of Rehabilitation and Aged Care, Repatriation General Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. simon.gunn@flinders.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Background: Phase angle (PhA) is derived from the resistance and reactance measurements obtained from bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) and is considered indicative of cellular health and membrane integrity. This study measured PhA values of rehabilitation patients and compared them to reference values, measures of functional ability and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels to explore their utility as a clinical tool to monitor disease progression and treatment efficacy.

Methods: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted on 215 ambulatory rehabilitation patients aged 20 - 94 years. All participants had been hospitalised for a stroke, orthopaedic or other condition resulting in a functional limitation. PhA was derived from BIA analysis and functional ability characterised using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), timed up and go (TUG) and maximal quadriceps strength (MQS). Serum levels of CRP were also collected.

Results: Stroke patients had the highest PhA (5.3 degrees) followed by elective orthopaedic surgery (5.0 degrees) with the other group (4.3 degrees) significantly lower than both previous categories (p < 0.001). Ambulatory rehabilitation patients' PhA values were dependent on age and sex (p < 0.001), lower than published age matched healthy reference values (p < or = 0.05) and similar to other hospitalised or sick groups, but also higher than values reported in critically ill patients. Patients with CRP values less than 10 mg.L-1 had significantly (p = 0.005) higher mean PhA values. Furthermore, the highest functional status quartiles had significantly higher PhAs (p < or = 0.04) for the FIM, MQS and TUG measures.

Conclusion: The results suggest that the phase angles of rehabilitation patients are between those of healthy individuals and seriously ill patients, thereby supporting claims that PhA is indicative of general health status. Phase angles are a potentially useful indicator of functional status in patients commencing an ambulatory rehabilitation program with a normal hydration status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus