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Temporal changes in key maternal and fetal factors affecting birth outcomes: a 32-year population-based study in an industrial city.

Glinianaia SV, Rankin J, Pless-Mulloli T, Pearce MS, Charlton M, Parker L - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2008)

Bottom Line: The average family size decreased mainly due to a decline in the proportion of families with 3 or more children.Key maternal and fetal factors affecting birth outcomes, such as maternal age, parity, socioeconomic status, birthweight and gestational age, changed substantially during the 32-year period, from 1961 to 1992.The availability of accurate gestational age is extremely important for correct interpretation of trends in birthweight.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, William Leech Building, The Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. svetlana.glinianaia@ncl.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: The link between maternal factors and birth outcomes is well established. Substantial changes in society and medical care over time have influenced women's reproductive choices and health, subsequently affecting birth outcomes. The objective of this study was to describe temporal changes in key maternal and fetal factors affecting birth outcomes in Newcastle upon Tyne over three decades, 1961-1992.

Methods: For these descriptive analyses we used data from a population-based birth record database constructed for the historical cohort Particulate Matter and Perinatal Events Research (PAMPER) study. The PAMPER database was created using details from paper-based hospital delivery and neonatal records for all births during 1961-1992 to mothers resident in Newcastle (out of a total of 109,086 singleton births, 97,809 hospital births with relevant information). In addition to hospital records, we used other sources for data collection on births not included in the delivery and neonatal records, for death and stillbirth registrations and for validation.

Results: The average family size decreased mainly due to a decline in the proportion of families with 3 or more children. The distribution of mean maternal ages in all and in primiparous women was lowest in the mid 1970s, corresponding to a peak in the proportion of teenage mothers. The proportion of older mothers declined until the late 1970s (from 16.5% to 3.4%) followed by a steady increase. Mean birthweight in all and term babies gradually increased from the mid 1970s. The increase in the percentage of preterm birth paralleled a two-fold increase in the percentage of caesarean section among preterm births during the last two decades. The gap between the most affluent and the most deprived groups of the population widened over the three decades.

Conclusion: Key maternal and fetal factors affecting birth outcomes, such as maternal age, parity, socioeconomic status, birthweight and gestational age, changed substantially during the 32-year period, from 1961 to 1992. The availability of accurate gestational age is extremely important for correct interpretation of trends in birthweight.

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(A) Mean birthweight in term (≥ 37 weeks), preterm (<37 weeks) and all births by year of birth; (B) Percentages of preterm birth and caesarean section (CS) among preterm births by year of birth and respective 3-year moving averages of the percentage.
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Figure 5: (A) Mean birthweight in term (≥ 37 weeks), preterm (<37 weeks) and all births by year of birth; (B) Percentages of preterm birth and caesarean section (CS) among preterm births by year of birth and respective 3-year moving averages of the percentage.

Mentions: Mean birthweight was lowest in the early 1960s, averaging around 3267 g in the second decade, followed by a gradual increase during the second half of the study period (Figure 5A and Table 2). The increase in mean birthweight for term births mostly accounted for the overall increase in mean birthweight, in particular in the last decade (Figure 5A). Thus during 1981–92 the mean birthweight at term [3373 g (SD ± 472)] was significantly higher than during the first two decades [3333 g (SD ± 497) in 1961–70 and 3332 g (SD ± 465) in 1971–80, p < 0.001], whereas the mean birthweight in preterm births did not change in 1981–92 [2309 g (SD ± 664)] compared to 1971–80 [2308 g (SD ± 683)] in contrast to the first decade [2170 g (SD ± 732), p < 0.001].


Temporal changes in key maternal and fetal factors affecting birth outcomes: a 32-year population-based study in an industrial city.

Glinianaia SV, Rankin J, Pless-Mulloli T, Pearce MS, Charlton M, Parker L - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2008)

(A) Mean birthweight in term (≥ 37 weeks), preterm (<37 weeks) and all births by year of birth; (B) Percentages of preterm birth and caesarean section (CS) among preterm births by year of birth and respective 3-year moving averages of the percentage.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2542990&req=5

Figure 5: (A) Mean birthweight in term (≥ 37 weeks), preterm (<37 weeks) and all births by year of birth; (B) Percentages of preterm birth and caesarean section (CS) among preterm births by year of birth and respective 3-year moving averages of the percentage.
Mentions: Mean birthweight was lowest in the early 1960s, averaging around 3267 g in the second decade, followed by a gradual increase during the second half of the study period (Figure 5A and Table 2). The increase in mean birthweight for term births mostly accounted for the overall increase in mean birthweight, in particular in the last decade (Figure 5A). Thus during 1981–92 the mean birthweight at term [3373 g (SD ± 472)] was significantly higher than during the first two decades [3333 g (SD ± 497) in 1961–70 and 3332 g (SD ± 465) in 1971–80, p < 0.001], whereas the mean birthweight in preterm births did not change in 1981–92 [2309 g (SD ± 664)] compared to 1971–80 [2308 g (SD ± 683)] in contrast to the first decade [2170 g (SD ± 732), p < 0.001].

Bottom Line: The average family size decreased mainly due to a decline in the proportion of families with 3 or more children.Key maternal and fetal factors affecting birth outcomes, such as maternal age, parity, socioeconomic status, birthweight and gestational age, changed substantially during the 32-year period, from 1961 to 1992.The availability of accurate gestational age is extremely important for correct interpretation of trends in birthweight.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, William Leech Building, The Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK. svetlana.glinianaia@ncl.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: The link between maternal factors and birth outcomes is well established. Substantial changes in society and medical care over time have influenced women's reproductive choices and health, subsequently affecting birth outcomes. The objective of this study was to describe temporal changes in key maternal and fetal factors affecting birth outcomes in Newcastle upon Tyne over three decades, 1961-1992.

Methods: For these descriptive analyses we used data from a population-based birth record database constructed for the historical cohort Particulate Matter and Perinatal Events Research (PAMPER) study. The PAMPER database was created using details from paper-based hospital delivery and neonatal records for all births during 1961-1992 to mothers resident in Newcastle (out of a total of 109,086 singleton births, 97,809 hospital births with relevant information). In addition to hospital records, we used other sources for data collection on births not included in the delivery and neonatal records, for death and stillbirth registrations and for validation.

Results: The average family size decreased mainly due to a decline in the proportion of families with 3 or more children. The distribution of mean maternal ages in all and in primiparous women was lowest in the mid 1970s, corresponding to a peak in the proportion of teenage mothers. The proportion of older mothers declined until the late 1970s (from 16.5% to 3.4%) followed by a steady increase. Mean birthweight in all and term babies gradually increased from the mid 1970s. The increase in the percentage of preterm birth paralleled a two-fold increase in the percentage of caesarean section among preterm births during the last two decades. The gap between the most affluent and the most deprived groups of the population widened over the three decades.

Conclusion: Key maternal and fetal factors affecting birth outcomes, such as maternal age, parity, socioeconomic status, birthweight and gestational age, changed substantially during the 32-year period, from 1961 to 1992. The availability of accurate gestational age is extremely important for correct interpretation of trends in birthweight.

Show MeSH