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Accelerometer-based wireless body area network to estimate intensity of therapy in post-acute rehabilitation.

Choquette S, Hamel M, Boissy P - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2008)

Bottom Line: Strong associations were found between WBANs estimates of active time and time and motion measures of active time.WBANs estimates of active time compare favorably with results from observation-based time and motion measures.Depending on the accuracy needed, the use of a single accelerometer module positioned on the hip may still be an interesting alternative to using multiple modules.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Centre on Aging, Health and Social Services Centre, Sherbrooke Geriatric University Institute, Quebec, Canada. stephane.choquette@usherbrooke.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been suggested that there is a dose-response relationship between the amount of therapy and functional recovery in post-acute rehabilitation care. To this day, only the total time of therapy has been investigated as a potential determinant of this dose-response relationship because of methodological and measurement challenges. The primary objective of this study was to compare time and motion measures during real life physical therapy with estimates of active time (i.e. the time during which a patient is active physically) obtained with a wireless body area network (WBAN) of 3D accelerometer modules positioned at the hip, wrist and ankle. The secondary objective was to assess the differences in estimates of active time when using a single accelerometer module positioned at the hip.

Methods: Five patients (77.4 +/- 5.2 y) with 4 different admission diagnoses (stroke, lower limb fracture, amputation and immobilization syndrome) were recruited in a post-acute rehabilitation center and observed during their physical therapy sessions throughout their stay. Active time was recorded by a trained observer using a continuous time and motion analysis program running on a Tablet-PC. Two WBAN configurations were used: 1) three accelerometer modules located at the hip, wrist and ankle (M3) and 2) one accelerometer located at the hip (M1). Acceleration signals from the WBANs were synchronized with the observations. Estimates of active time were computed based on the temporal density of the acceleration signals.

Results: A total of 62 physical therapy sessions were observed. Strong associations were found between WBANs estimates of active time and time and motion measures of active time. For the combined sessions, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.93 (P < or = 0.001) for M3 and 0.79 (P < or = 0.001) for M1. The mean percentage of differences between observation measures and estimates from the WBAN of active time was -8.7% +/- 2.0% using data from M3 and -16.4% +/- 10.4% using data from M1.

Conclusion: WBANs estimates of active time compare favorably with results from observation-based time and motion measures. While the investigation on the association between active time and outcomes of rehabilitation needs to be studied in a larger scale study, the use of an accelerometer-based WBAN to measure active time is a promising approach that offers a better overall precision than methods relying on work sampling. Depending on the accuracy needed, the use of a single accelerometer module positioned on the hip may still be an interesting alternative to using multiple modules.

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Association between estimates of active time and measure of active time for observed sessions. Intraclass correlation coefficient between accelerometers' estimates and measurement of active time are presented in the lower right corner of each scatter plot. 95% Confidence interval of ICC was 0.89 to 0.96 for M3 and 0.68 to 0.87 for M1.
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Figure 4: Association between estimates of active time and measure of active time for observed sessions. Intraclass correlation coefficient between accelerometers' estimates and measurement of active time are presented in the lower right corner of each scatter plot. 95% Confidence interval of ICC was 0.89 to 0.96 for M3 and 0.68 to 0.87 for M1.

Mentions: Scatter plots of estimates by measure of active time are presented for observed sessions in Figure 4. For combined sessions, ICC was 0.93 (P ≤ 0.001) for M3 and 0.79 (P ≤ 0.001) for M1. ICC was also performed for each subject. All correlations were significant (P ≤ 0.01). The ICC of subjects ranged from 0.65 to 0.98 for M3 and from 0.63 to 0.89 for M1.


Accelerometer-based wireless body area network to estimate intensity of therapy in post-acute rehabilitation.

Choquette S, Hamel M, Boissy P - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2008)

Association between estimates of active time and measure of active time for observed sessions. Intraclass correlation coefficient between accelerometers' estimates and measurement of active time are presented in the lower right corner of each scatter plot. 95% Confidence interval of ICC was 0.89 to 0.96 for M3 and 0.68 to 0.87 for M1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2542392&req=5

Figure 4: Association between estimates of active time and measure of active time for observed sessions. Intraclass correlation coefficient between accelerometers' estimates and measurement of active time are presented in the lower right corner of each scatter plot. 95% Confidence interval of ICC was 0.89 to 0.96 for M3 and 0.68 to 0.87 for M1.
Mentions: Scatter plots of estimates by measure of active time are presented for observed sessions in Figure 4. For combined sessions, ICC was 0.93 (P ≤ 0.001) for M3 and 0.79 (P ≤ 0.001) for M1. ICC was also performed for each subject. All correlations were significant (P ≤ 0.01). The ICC of subjects ranged from 0.65 to 0.98 for M3 and from 0.63 to 0.89 for M1.

Bottom Line: Strong associations were found between WBANs estimates of active time and time and motion measures of active time.WBANs estimates of active time compare favorably with results from observation-based time and motion measures.Depending on the accuracy needed, the use of a single accelerometer module positioned on the hip may still be an interesting alternative to using multiple modules.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Centre on Aging, Health and Social Services Centre, Sherbrooke Geriatric University Institute, Quebec, Canada. stephane.choquette@usherbrooke.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been suggested that there is a dose-response relationship between the amount of therapy and functional recovery in post-acute rehabilitation care. To this day, only the total time of therapy has been investigated as a potential determinant of this dose-response relationship because of methodological and measurement challenges. The primary objective of this study was to compare time and motion measures during real life physical therapy with estimates of active time (i.e. the time during which a patient is active physically) obtained with a wireless body area network (WBAN) of 3D accelerometer modules positioned at the hip, wrist and ankle. The secondary objective was to assess the differences in estimates of active time when using a single accelerometer module positioned at the hip.

Methods: Five patients (77.4 +/- 5.2 y) with 4 different admission diagnoses (stroke, lower limb fracture, amputation and immobilization syndrome) were recruited in a post-acute rehabilitation center and observed during their physical therapy sessions throughout their stay. Active time was recorded by a trained observer using a continuous time and motion analysis program running on a Tablet-PC. Two WBAN configurations were used: 1) three accelerometer modules located at the hip, wrist and ankle (M3) and 2) one accelerometer located at the hip (M1). Acceleration signals from the WBANs were synchronized with the observations. Estimates of active time were computed based on the temporal density of the acceleration signals.

Results: A total of 62 physical therapy sessions were observed. Strong associations were found between WBANs estimates of active time and time and motion measures of active time. For the combined sessions, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.93 (P < or = 0.001) for M3 and 0.79 (P < or = 0.001) for M1. The mean percentage of differences between observation measures and estimates from the WBAN of active time was -8.7% +/- 2.0% using data from M3 and -16.4% +/- 10.4% using data from M1.

Conclusion: WBANs estimates of active time compare favorably with results from observation-based time and motion measures. While the investigation on the association between active time and outcomes of rehabilitation needs to be studied in a larger scale study, the use of an accelerometer-based WBAN to measure active time is a promising approach that offers a better overall precision than methods relying on work sampling. Depending on the accuracy needed, the use of a single accelerometer module positioned on the hip may still be an interesting alternative to using multiple modules.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus