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Rule-selection and action-selection have a shared neuroanatomical basis in the human prefrontal and parietal cortex.

Rowe J, Hughes L, Eckstein D, Owen AM - Cereb. Cortex (2008)

Bottom Line: We show that the voluntary selection of rules to govern future responses to events is associated with activation of similar regions of prefrontal and parietal cortex as the voluntary selection of an action itself.The results are discussed in terms of hierarchical models and the adaptive coding potential of prefrontal neurons and their contribution to a global workspace for nonautomatic tasks.These tasks include the choices we make about our behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK. James.rowe@mrccbu.cam.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The human capacity for voluntary action is one of the major contributors to our success as a species. In addition to choosing actions themselves, we can also voluntarily choose behavioral codes or sets of rules that can guide future responses to events. Such rules have been proposed to be superordinate to actions in a cognitive hierarchy and mediated by distinct brain regions. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to study novel tasks of rule-based and voluntary action. We show that the voluntary selection of rules to govern future responses to events is associated with activation of similar regions of prefrontal and parietal cortex as the voluntary selection of an action itself. The results are discussed in terms of hierarchical models and the adaptive coding potential of prefrontal neurons and their contribution to a global workspace for nonautomatic tasks. These tasks include the choices we make about our behavior.

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SPM{t} map thresholded at FDR P < 0.05 for the contrast of “selection” versus “specified” trials in experiment 1, averaging across rule and action based trials, and across color and height modalities, rendered on the SPM5 canonical T1 brain volume in MNI space.
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fig5: SPM{t} map thresholded at FDR P < 0.05 for the contrast of “selection” versus “specified” trials in experiment 1, averaging across rule and action based trials, and across color and height modalities, rendered on the SPM5 canonical T1 brain volume in MNI space.

Mentions: To illustrate the similarity between rule-selection and action-selection, we performed the contrast “all-selection versus all-specified.” We chose 6 regional peaks from this contrast in prefrontal and parietal cortex (see Table 3 for further details and Fig. 4) and show separately in Figure 4 the BOLD signal change for the contrasts “rule-selection versus rule-specification” and “action-selection versus action-specification.” Not only are the peaks of activation very similar for the rule and action contrasts (Fig. 3A,B), but in these regions the magnitude of effect is similar. This new contrast, shown in Figure 5, overlaps extensively with Figure 3A,B as expected.


Rule-selection and action-selection have a shared neuroanatomical basis in the human prefrontal and parietal cortex.

Rowe J, Hughes L, Eckstein D, Owen AM - Cereb. Cortex (2008)

SPM{t} map thresholded at FDR P < 0.05 for the contrast of “selection” versus “specified” trials in experiment 1, averaging across rule and action based trials, and across color and height modalities, rendered on the SPM5 canonical T1 brain volume in MNI space.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2536699&req=5

fig5: SPM{t} map thresholded at FDR P < 0.05 for the contrast of “selection” versus “specified” trials in experiment 1, averaging across rule and action based trials, and across color and height modalities, rendered on the SPM5 canonical T1 brain volume in MNI space.
Mentions: To illustrate the similarity between rule-selection and action-selection, we performed the contrast “all-selection versus all-specified.” We chose 6 regional peaks from this contrast in prefrontal and parietal cortex (see Table 3 for further details and Fig. 4) and show separately in Figure 4 the BOLD signal change for the contrasts “rule-selection versus rule-specification” and “action-selection versus action-specification.” Not only are the peaks of activation very similar for the rule and action contrasts (Fig. 3A,B), but in these regions the magnitude of effect is similar. This new contrast, shown in Figure 5, overlaps extensively with Figure 3A,B as expected.

Bottom Line: We show that the voluntary selection of rules to govern future responses to events is associated with activation of similar regions of prefrontal and parietal cortex as the voluntary selection of an action itself.The results are discussed in terms of hierarchical models and the adaptive coding potential of prefrontal neurons and their contribution to a global workspace for nonautomatic tasks.These tasks include the choices we make about our behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK. James.rowe@mrccbu.cam.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The human capacity for voluntary action is one of the major contributors to our success as a species. In addition to choosing actions themselves, we can also voluntarily choose behavioral codes or sets of rules that can guide future responses to events. Such rules have been proposed to be superordinate to actions in a cognitive hierarchy and mediated by distinct brain regions. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to study novel tasks of rule-based and voluntary action. We show that the voluntary selection of rules to govern future responses to events is associated with activation of similar regions of prefrontal and parietal cortex as the voluntary selection of an action itself. The results are discussed in terms of hierarchical models and the adaptive coding potential of prefrontal neurons and their contribution to a global workspace for nonautomatic tasks. These tasks include the choices we make about our behavior.

Show MeSH