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Early life environment and snoring in adulthood.

Franklin KA, Janson C, Gíslason T, Gulsvik A, Gunnbjörnsdottir M, Laerum BN, Lindberg E, Norrman E, Nyström L, Omenaas E, Torén K, Svanes C - Respir. Res. (2008)

Bottom Line: Being hospitalized for a respiratory infection before the age of two years (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.59), suffering from recurrent otitis as a child (OR = 1.18; 95%CI 1.05-1.33), growing up in a large family (OR = 1.04; 95%CI 1.002-1.07) and being exposed to a dog at home as a newborn (OR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.12-1.42) were independently related to snoring later in life and independent of a number of possible confounders in adulthood.The same childhood environmental factors except household size were also related with snoring and daytime sleepiness combined.Having had severe airway infections or recurrent otitis in childhood, being exposed to a dog as a newborn and growing up in a large family are environmental factors associated with snoring in adulthood.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. karl.franklin@lung.umu.se

ABSTRACT

Background: To our knowledge, no studies of the possible association of early life environment with snoring in adulthood have been published. We aimed to investigate whether early life environment is associated with snoring later in life.

Methods: A questionnaire including snoring frequency in adulthood and environmental factors in early life was obtained from 16,190 randomly selected men and women, aged 25-54 years, in Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Denmark and Estonia (response rate 74%).

Results: A total of 15,556 subjects answered the questions on snoring. Habitual snoring, defined as loud and disturbing snoring at least 3 nights a week, was reported by 18%. Being hospitalized for a respiratory infection before the age of two years (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.59), suffering from recurrent otitis as a child (OR = 1.18; 95%CI 1.05-1.33), growing up in a large family (OR = 1.04; 95%CI 1.002-1.07) and being exposed to a dog at home as a newborn (OR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.12-1.42) were independently related to snoring later in life and independent of a number of possible confounders in adulthood. The same childhood environmental factors except household size were also related with snoring and daytime sleepiness combined.

Conclusion: The predisposition for adult snoring may be partly established early in life. Having had severe airway infections or recurrent otitis in childhood, being exposed to a dog as a newborn and growing up in a large family are environmental factors associated with snoring in adulthood.

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Adjusted population attributable fraction for childhood (black bars) and adult risk factors (white bars) for snoring.
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Figure 1: Adjusted population attributable fraction for childhood (black bars) and adult risk factors (white bars) for snoring.

Mentions: The adjusted population attributable fraction for snoring of having been exposed to a dog when newborn was 3.4% while the corresponding figures were 2.5% for otitis, 1.4% for growing up in family of more than 5 persons and 0.7% for being hospitalized for a respiratory disease before the age of 2. Of the adult risk factors, the adjusted population attributable fraction for snoring was 3.0%, for rhinitis 4.5%, for chronic bronchitis 9.1%, for obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) 14.1% and for ever smoking (Figure 1).


Early life environment and snoring in adulthood.

Franklin KA, Janson C, Gíslason T, Gulsvik A, Gunnbjörnsdottir M, Laerum BN, Lindberg E, Norrman E, Nyström L, Omenaas E, Torén K, Svanes C - Respir. Res. (2008)

Adjusted population attributable fraction for childhood (black bars) and adult risk factors (white bars) for snoring.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2536663&req=5

Figure 1: Adjusted population attributable fraction for childhood (black bars) and adult risk factors (white bars) for snoring.
Mentions: The adjusted population attributable fraction for snoring of having been exposed to a dog when newborn was 3.4% while the corresponding figures were 2.5% for otitis, 1.4% for growing up in family of more than 5 persons and 0.7% for being hospitalized for a respiratory disease before the age of 2. Of the adult risk factors, the adjusted population attributable fraction for snoring was 3.0%, for rhinitis 4.5%, for chronic bronchitis 9.1%, for obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) 14.1% and for ever smoking (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Being hospitalized for a respiratory infection before the age of two years (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.59), suffering from recurrent otitis as a child (OR = 1.18; 95%CI 1.05-1.33), growing up in a large family (OR = 1.04; 95%CI 1.002-1.07) and being exposed to a dog at home as a newborn (OR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.12-1.42) were independently related to snoring later in life and independent of a number of possible confounders in adulthood.The same childhood environmental factors except household size were also related with snoring and daytime sleepiness combined.Having had severe airway infections or recurrent otitis in childhood, being exposed to a dog as a newborn and growing up in a large family are environmental factors associated with snoring in adulthood.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. karl.franklin@lung.umu.se

ABSTRACT

Background: To our knowledge, no studies of the possible association of early life environment with snoring in adulthood have been published. We aimed to investigate whether early life environment is associated with snoring later in life.

Methods: A questionnaire including snoring frequency in adulthood and environmental factors in early life was obtained from 16,190 randomly selected men and women, aged 25-54 years, in Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Denmark and Estonia (response rate 74%).

Results: A total of 15,556 subjects answered the questions on snoring. Habitual snoring, defined as loud and disturbing snoring at least 3 nights a week, was reported by 18%. Being hospitalized for a respiratory infection before the age of two years (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.59), suffering from recurrent otitis as a child (OR = 1.18; 95%CI 1.05-1.33), growing up in a large family (OR = 1.04; 95%CI 1.002-1.07) and being exposed to a dog at home as a newborn (OR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.12-1.42) were independently related to snoring later in life and independent of a number of possible confounders in adulthood. The same childhood environmental factors except household size were also related with snoring and daytime sleepiness combined.

Conclusion: The predisposition for adult snoring may be partly established early in life. Having had severe airway infections or recurrent otitis in childhood, being exposed to a dog as a newborn and growing up in a large family are environmental factors associated with snoring in adulthood.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus