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Osteoid osteoma of a metacarpal bone: a case report and review of the literature.

Chronopoulos E, Xypnitos FN, Nikolaou VS, Efstathopoulos N, Korres D - J Med Case Rep (2008)

Bottom Line: The pain disappeared immediately after the operation.At the 2-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and there was no evidence of recurrence.Physicians should be aware of the unusual presence and the atypical clinical presentation of this benign lesion in the metacarpal bones of the hand.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Orthopedic Department, Konstantopoulion Hospital, Athens University, Nea Ionia, Greece. bniko@otenet.gr

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Osteoid osteoma is a benign tumor of the growing skeleton. It presents with pain, which is usually worse at night. The radiographic features consist of a central oval or round nidus surrounded first by a radiolucent area followed by another area of sclerotic bone. In the hand, osteoid osteoma is more commonly located in the phalanges and carpal bones. The metacarpals are the least common sites for osteoid osteoma.

Case presentation: We present a case of an osteoid osteoma of the left third metacarpal bone in a 36-year-old woman. The clinical and radiographic findings along with the surgical management of the lesion are presented. The pain disappeared immediately after the operation. At the 2-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and there was no evidence of recurrence.

Conclusion: Physicians should be aware of the unusual presence and the atypical clinical presentation of this benign lesion in the metacarpal bones of the hand.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Surgical procedure. (a) Dorsal approach at the third metacarpal head. (b) Resection of the dorsal sclerotic bone. (c) The defect filled with an autogenous cancellous bone graft.
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Figure 3: Surgical procedure. (a) Dorsal approach at the third metacarpal head. (b) Resection of the dorsal sclerotic bone. (c) The defect filled with an autogenous cancellous bone graft.

Mentions: Computed tomography (CT) of the left hand clearly showed an oval radiolucent zone at the head of the third metacarpal bone and marked sclerosis around the lesion (Fig. 2). The history and clinical and radiographic findings pointed to the diagnosis of an osteoid osteoma of the head of the third metacarpal bone in the left hand. The patient was operated on 30 days later, by a dorsal approach (Fig. 3a), under a brachial plexus block. An en bloc excision of the nidus was performed using a small curette. A high-speed burr was also used to remove the sclerotic bone inside the lesion (Fig. 3b). The defect was filled with an autogenous cancellous bone graft (Fig. 3c). The hand was immobilized postoperatively with a splint.


Osteoid osteoma of a metacarpal bone: a case report and review of the literature.

Chronopoulos E, Xypnitos FN, Nikolaou VS, Efstathopoulos N, Korres D - J Med Case Rep (2008)

Surgical procedure. (a) Dorsal approach at the third metacarpal head. (b) Resection of the dorsal sclerotic bone. (c) The defect filled with an autogenous cancellous bone graft.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2533345&req=5

Figure 3: Surgical procedure. (a) Dorsal approach at the third metacarpal head. (b) Resection of the dorsal sclerotic bone. (c) The defect filled with an autogenous cancellous bone graft.
Mentions: Computed tomography (CT) of the left hand clearly showed an oval radiolucent zone at the head of the third metacarpal bone and marked sclerosis around the lesion (Fig. 2). The history and clinical and radiographic findings pointed to the diagnosis of an osteoid osteoma of the head of the third metacarpal bone in the left hand. The patient was operated on 30 days later, by a dorsal approach (Fig. 3a), under a brachial plexus block. An en bloc excision of the nidus was performed using a small curette. A high-speed burr was also used to remove the sclerotic bone inside the lesion (Fig. 3b). The defect was filled with an autogenous cancellous bone graft (Fig. 3c). The hand was immobilized postoperatively with a splint.

Bottom Line: The pain disappeared immediately after the operation.At the 2-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and there was no evidence of recurrence.Physicians should be aware of the unusual presence and the atypical clinical presentation of this benign lesion in the metacarpal bones of the hand.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Orthopedic Department, Konstantopoulion Hospital, Athens University, Nea Ionia, Greece. bniko@otenet.gr

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Osteoid osteoma is a benign tumor of the growing skeleton. It presents with pain, which is usually worse at night. The radiographic features consist of a central oval or round nidus surrounded first by a radiolucent area followed by another area of sclerotic bone. In the hand, osteoid osteoma is more commonly located in the phalanges and carpal bones. The metacarpals are the least common sites for osteoid osteoma.

Case presentation: We present a case of an osteoid osteoma of the left third metacarpal bone in a 36-year-old woman. The clinical and radiographic findings along with the surgical management of the lesion are presented. The pain disappeared immediately after the operation. At the 2-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and there was no evidence of recurrence.

Conclusion: Physicians should be aware of the unusual presence and the atypical clinical presentation of this benign lesion in the metacarpal bones of the hand.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus