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A review of imaging techniques for systems biology.

Kherlopian AR, Song T, Duan Q, Neimark MA, Po MJ, Gohagan JK, Laine AF - BMC Syst Biol (2008)

Bottom Line: During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology.In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology.As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. ark2010@med.cornell.edu

ABSTRACT
This paper presents a review of imaging techniques and of their utility in system biology. During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology. In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology. As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

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Near field images of an Ag nanoshell. Nanoshell exposed to (a) 721 nm, (b) 492 nm, and (c) 336 nm laser beam and consequential dipole, quadrupole, and dark plasmons, respectively. Surface plasmon oscillations are collective electron motion resultant of optical illumination, and subsequent modes are shown. Adapted from [102].
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Figure 9: Near field images of an Ag nanoshell. Nanoshell exposed to (a) 721 nm, (b) 492 nm, and (c) 336 nm laser beam and consequential dipole, quadrupole, and dark plasmons, respectively. Surface plasmon oscillations are collective electron motion resultant of optical illumination, and subsequent modes are shown. Adapted from [102].

Mentions: Nanoshells are a class of metal nanostructures consisting of a dielectric silica core surrounded by a very thin metallic shell. By varying the core to shell ratio and the overall size of the nanoshells, strong scattering properties can be achieved that result in resonance wavelengths generating heat [15]. See Figure 9 for cross sectional views of a nanoshell. Fabricating nanoshells with specific antibodies provide a means for scattering based molecular imaging [15,95], which provides molecule specific contrast on the nanometer scale.


A review of imaging techniques for systems biology.

Kherlopian AR, Song T, Duan Q, Neimark MA, Po MJ, Gohagan JK, Laine AF - BMC Syst Biol (2008)

Near field images of an Ag nanoshell. Nanoshell exposed to (a) 721 nm, (b) 492 nm, and (c) 336 nm laser beam and consequential dipole, quadrupole, and dark plasmons, respectively. Surface plasmon oscillations are collective electron motion resultant of optical illumination, and subsequent modes are shown. Adapted from [102].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2533300&req=5

Figure 9: Near field images of an Ag nanoshell. Nanoshell exposed to (a) 721 nm, (b) 492 nm, and (c) 336 nm laser beam and consequential dipole, quadrupole, and dark plasmons, respectively. Surface plasmon oscillations are collective electron motion resultant of optical illumination, and subsequent modes are shown. Adapted from [102].
Mentions: Nanoshells are a class of metal nanostructures consisting of a dielectric silica core surrounded by a very thin metallic shell. By varying the core to shell ratio and the overall size of the nanoshells, strong scattering properties can be achieved that result in resonance wavelengths generating heat [15]. See Figure 9 for cross sectional views of a nanoshell. Fabricating nanoshells with specific antibodies provide a means for scattering based molecular imaging [15,95], which provides molecule specific contrast on the nanometer scale.

Bottom Line: During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology.In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology.As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. ark2010@med.cornell.edu

ABSTRACT
This paper presents a review of imaging techniques and of their utility in system biology. During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology. In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology. As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus