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A review of imaging techniques for systems biology.

Kherlopian AR, Song T, Duan Q, Neimark MA, Po MJ, Gohagan JK, Laine AF - BMC Syst Biol (2008)

Bottom Line: During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology.In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology.As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. ark2010@med.cornell.edu

ABSTRACT
This paper presents a review of imaging techniques and of their utility in system biology. During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology. In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology. As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

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In vivo point resolved (single voxel) MRI spectroscropy. (a) Axial and (b) sagital views of human brain and outlined voxel for MRS. (c) 1H spectrum with readily visible N-acetylaspartate (NAA) peak. An aberrant NAA peak can be an indicator of brain injury or disease.
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Figure 6: In vivo point resolved (single voxel) MRI spectroscropy. (a) Axial and (b) sagital views of human brain and outlined voxel for MRS. (c) 1H spectrum with readily visible N-acetylaspartate (NAA) peak. An aberrant NAA peak can be an indicator of brain injury or disease.

Mentions: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is an emerging imaging and biochemical analysis technique in biomedical science. It combines the analytical ability of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to identify biochemical species with the capabilities of MRI to isolate individual voxels which are three-dimensional pixels. MRS employs chemical shift imaging to localize spectra for individual voxels [73]. This is achieved by phase modulated RF pulses which eliminate signal contamination into neighboring voxels. When MRS is combined with MRI, concurrent anatomical and biochemical information is obtained (Figure 6).


A review of imaging techniques for systems biology.

Kherlopian AR, Song T, Duan Q, Neimark MA, Po MJ, Gohagan JK, Laine AF - BMC Syst Biol (2008)

In vivo point resolved (single voxel) MRI spectroscropy. (a) Axial and (b) sagital views of human brain and outlined voxel for MRS. (c) 1H spectrum with readily visible N-acetylaspartate (NAA) peak. An aberrant NAA peak can be an indicator of brain injury or disease.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2533300&req=5

Figure 6: In vivo point resolved (single voxel) MRI spectroscropy. (a) Axial and (b) sagital views of human brain and outlined voxel for MRS. (c) 1H spectrum with readily visible N-acetylaspartate (NAA) peak. An aberrant NAA peak can be an indicator of brain injury or disease.
Mentions: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is an emerging imaging and biochemical analysis technique in biomedical science. It combines the analytical ability of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to identify biochemical species with the capabilities of MRI to isolate individual voxels which are three-dimensional pixels. MRS employs chemical shift imaging to localize spectra for individual voxels [73]. This is achieved by phase modulated RF pulses which eliminate signal contamination into neighboring voxels. When MRS is combined with MRI, concurrent anatomical and biochemical information is obtained (Figure 6).

Bottom Line: During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology.In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology.As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. ark2010@med.cornell.edu

ABSTRACT
This paper presents a review of imaging techniques and of their utility in system biology. During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology. In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology. As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus