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A review of imaging techniques for systems biology.

Kherlopian AR, Song T, Duan Q, Neimark MA, Po MJ, Gohagan JK, Laine AF - BMC Syst Biol (2008)

Bottom Line: During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology.In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology.As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. ark2010@med.cornell.edu

ABSTRACT
This paper presents a review of imaging techniques and of their utility in system biology. During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology. In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology. As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

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Resolution spectrum of imaging techniques. The schematic shows the resolution gap between microscopy and anatomical imaging. Metabolic imaging has successfully been linked to anatomical imaging despite having lower resolution. The schematic axis is linear.
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Figure 11: Resolution spectrum of imaging techniques. The schematic shows the resolution gap between microscopy and anatomical imaging. Metabolic imaging has successfully been linked to anatomical imaging despite having lower resolution. The schematic axis is linear.

Mentions: As seen in Figure 11, there is a resolution gap between microscopy and anatomical imaging. This gap also represents the divide between experimental and clinical imaging applications. In contrast, acquiring anatomical and metabolic information with clinical scanners has been achieved by coupling imaging technologies. For example, it is now commonplace for usage of combination PET/CT scanners. This allows for metabolic information acquired in PET to be readily registered with higher resolution anatomical CT images. Also, with fMRI a slower MRI scan is also conducted to form a detailed brain atlas, to which functional images are later registered. As a result there is a resolution continuum between anatomical and metabolic imaging. To reach the same end for microscopy and anatomical imaging, molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells may find more clinical applications and thus improve the resolution that can be achieved with clinical scanners.


A review of imaging techniques for systems biology.

Kherlopian AR, Song T, Duan Q, Neimark MA, Po MJ, Gohagan JK, Laine AF - BMC Syst Biol (2008)

Resolution spectrum of imaging techniques. The schematic shows the resolution gap between microscopy and anatomical imaging. Metabolic imaging has successfully been linked to anatomical imaging despite having lower resolution. The schematic axis is linear.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2533300&req=5

Figure 11: Resolution spectrum of imaging techniques. The schematic shows the resolution gap between microscopy and anatomical imaging. Metabolic imaging has successfully been linked to anatomical imaging despite having lower resolution. The schematic axis is linear.
Mentions: As seen in Figure 11, there is a resolution gap between microscopy and anatomical imaging. This gap also represents the divide between experimental and clinical imaging applications. In contrast, acquiring anatomical and metabolic information with clinical scanners has been achieved by coupling imaging technologies. For example, it is now commonplace for usage of combination PET/CT scanners. This allows for metabolic information acquired in PET to be readily registered with higher resolution anatomical CT images. Also, with fMRI a slower MRI scan is also conducted to form a detailed brain atlas, to which functional images are later registered. As a result there is a resolution continuum between anatomical and metabolic imaging. To reach the same end for microscopy and anatomical imaging, molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells may find more clinical applications and thus improve the resolution that can be achieved with clinical scanners.

Bottom Line: During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology.In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology.As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. ark2010@med.cornell.edu

ABSTRACT
This paper presents a review of imaging techniques and of their utility in system biology. During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology. In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), PET (Positron Emission Tomography), and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology. As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus