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Aromatherapy massage affects menopausal symptoms in korean climacteric women: a pilot-controlled clinical trial.

Hur MH, Yang YS, Lee MS - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2008)

Bottom Line: The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P < 0.05).There were also significant intergroup differences in subcategories such as vasomotor, melancholia, arthralgia and myalgia (all P < 0.05).Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nursing, Eulji University, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, School of Medicine, Eulji University and Department of Medical Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon,South Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms in Korean climacteric women. Kupperman's menopausal index was used to compare an experimental group of 25 climacteric women with a wait-listed control group of 27 climacteric women. Aromatherapy was applied topically to subjects in the experimental group in the form of massage on the abdomen, back and arms using lavender, rose geranium, rose and jasmine in almond and primrose oils once a week for 8 weeks (eight times in total). The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P < 0.05). There were also significant intergroup differences in subcategories such as vasomotor, melancholia, arthralgia and myalgia (all P < 0.05). These findings suggest that aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment of menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, depression and pain in climacteric women. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects were from the aromatherapy, the massage or both. Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean Kupperman index score at baseline and after 8 weeks in the aromatherapy group (n = 25) and the control group (n = 27).
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Figure 2: Mean Kupperman index score at baseline and after 8 weeks in the aromatherapy group (n = 25) and the control group (n = 27).

Mentions: The mean baseline level of the menopausal index did not differ between the two groups (t = 0.72, P = 0.47; Fig. 2). However, after 8 weeks of treatment, Kupperman index scores differed significantly between the aromatherapy group and the control group (t = −2.08, P = 0.043), with significant changes from baseline in the aromatherapy group (t = 2.83, P < 0.01). The change in the menopausal index level was more significant in the aromatherapy group than in the control group (t = 3.00, P < 0.005, aromatherapy: −5.44 ± 9.60, mean ± SD; control: 1.59 ± 7.25).Figure 2.


Aromatherapy massage affects menopausal symptoms in korean climacteric women: a pilot-controlled clinical trial.

Hur MH, Yang YS, Lee MS - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2008)

Mean Kupperman index score at baseline and after 8 weeks in the aromatherapy group (n = 25) and the control group (n = 27).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2529395&req=5

Figure 2: Mean Kupperman index score at baseline and after 8 weeks in the aromatherapy group (n = 25) and the control group (n = 27).
Mentions: The mean baseline level of the menopausal index did not differ between the two groups (t = 0.72, P = 0.47; Fig. 2). However, after 8 weeks of treatment, Kupperman index scores differed significantly between the aromatherapy group and the control group (t = −2.08, P = 0.043), with significant changes from baseline in the aromatherapy group (t = 2.83, P < 0.01). The change in the menopausal index level was more significant in the aromatherapy group than in the control group (t = 3.00, P < 0.005, aromatherapy: −5.44 ± 9.60, mean ± SD; control: 1.59 ± 7.25).Figure 2.

Bottom Line: The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P < 0.05).There were also significant intergroup differences in subcategories such as vasomotor, melancholia, arthralgia and myalgia (all P < 0.05).Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nursing, Eulji University, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, School of Medicine, Eulji University and Department of Medical Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon,South Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms in Korean climacteric women. Kupperman's menopausal index was used to compare an experimental group of 25 climacteric women with a wait-listed control group of 27 climacteric women. Aromatherapy was applied topically to subjects in the experimental group in the form of massage on the abdomen, back and arms using lavender, rose geranium, rose and jasmine in almond and primrose oils once a week for 8 weeks (eight times in total). The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P < 0.05). There were also significant intergroup differences in subcategories such as vasomotor, melancholia, arthralgia and myalgia (all P < 0.05). These findings suggest that aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment of menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, depression and pain in climacteric women. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects were from the aromatherapy, the massage or both. Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus