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Biomechanical influence of TKA designs with varying radii on bilateral TKA patients during sit-to-stand.

Wang H, Simpson KJ, Chamnongkich S, Kinsey T, Mahoney OM - Dyn Med (2008)

Bottom Line: The biomechanical effectiveness of an SR for functional daily activities, i.e., sit-to-stand, is not well understood.Compared to the MR limb, the SR limb demonstrated greater peak antero-posterior (AP) ground reaction force, higher AP ground reaction impulse, less vastus lateralis and semitendinosus EMG during the forward-thrust phase of the STS movement.No significant difference of knee extensor moment was found between the two knees.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science, Ball State University, Muncie, IN, USA. wanghenr@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Compared to the design of a traditional multi-radius (MR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the single-radius (SR) implant investigated has a fixed flexion/extension center of rotation. The biomechanical effectiveness of an SR for functional daily activities, i.e., sit-to-stand, is not well understood. The purpose of the study was to compare the biomechanics underlying functional performance of the sit-to-stand (STS) movement between the limbs containing an MR and an SR TKA of bilateral TKA participants.

Methods: Sagittal plane kinematics and kinetics, and EMG data for selected knee flexor and extensor muscles were analyzed for eight bilateral TKA patients, each with an SR and an MR TKA implant.

Results: Compared to the MR limb, the SR limb demonstrated greater peak antero-posterior (AP) ground reaction force, higher AP ground reaction impulse, less vastus lateralis and semitendinosus EMG during the forward-thrust phase of the STS movement. No significant difference of knee extensor moment was found between the two knees.

Conclusion: Some GRF and EMG differences were evident between the MR and SR limbs during STS movement. Compensatory adaptations may be used to perform the STS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sample graphs from one participant. Graphs A, C, and E are SR limb's ankle, knee, and hip angles, respectively. Graphs B, D, and F are MR limb's ankle, knee, and hip angles, respectively.
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Figure 2: Sample graphs from one participant. Graphs A, C, and E are SR limb's ankle, knee, and hip angles, respectively. Graphs B, D, and F are MR limb's ankle, knee, and hip angles, respectively.

Mentions: For the angular kinematics, Figure 2 demonstrates similar patterns of ankle, knee, and hip joint angular displacements between the two TKA limbs during the STS for a representative participant. The descriptive data from Table 3 also qualitatively exhibits a tendency of similarity between the two TKA limbs for peak angular velocities of ankle, knee, and hip joints during the STS.


Biomechanical influence of TKA designs with varying radii on bilateral TKA patients during sit-to-stand.

Wang H, Simpson KJ, Chamnongkich S, Kinsey T, Mahoney OM - Dyn Med (2008)

Sample graphs from one participant. Graphs A, C, and E are SR limb's ankle, knee, and hip angles, respectively. Graphs B, D, and F are MR limb's ankle, knee, and hip angles, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2526996&req=5

Figure 2: Sample graphs from one participant. Graphs A, C, and E are SR limb's ankle, knee, and hip angles, respectively. Graphs B, D, and F are MR limb's ankle, knee, and hip angles, respectively.
Mentions: For the angular kinematics, Figure 2 demonstrates similar patterns of ankle, knee, and hip joint angular displacements between the two TKA limbs during the STS for a representative participant. The descriptive data from Table 3 also qualitatively exhibits a tendency of similarity between the two TKA limbs for peak angular velocities of ankle, knee, and hip joints during the STS.

Bottom Line: The biomechanical effectiveness of an SR for functional daily activities, i.e., sit-to-stand, is not well understood.Compared to the MR limb, the SR limb demonstrated greater peak antero-posterior (AP) ground reaction force, higher AP ground reaction impulse, less vastus lateralis and semitendinosus EMG during the forward-thrust phase of the STS movement.No significant difference of knee extensor moment was found between the two knees.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science, Ball State University, Muncie, IN, USA. wanghenr@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Compared to the design of a traditional multi-radius (MR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the single-radius (SR) implant investigated has a fixed flexion/extension center of rotation. The biomechanical effectiveness of an SR for functional daily activities, i.e., sit-to-stand, is not well understood. The purpose of the study was to compare the biomechanics underlying functional performance of the sit-to-stand (STS) movement between the limbs containing an MR and an SR TKA of bilateral TKA participants.

Methods: Sagittal plane kinematics and kinetics, and EMG data for selected knee flexor and extensor muscles were analyzed for eight bilateral TKA patients, each with an SR and an MR TKA implant.

Results: Compared to the MR limb, the SR limb demonstrated greater peak antero-posterior (AP) ground reaction force, higher AP ground reaction impulse, less vastus lateralis and semitendinosus EMG during the forward-thrust phase of the STS movement. No significant difference of knee extensor moment was found between the two knees.

Conclusion: Some GRF and EMG differences were evident between the MR and SR limbs during STS movement. Compensatory adaptations may be used to perform the STS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus