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Histological variants of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma.

Grayson W, Pantanowitz L - Diagn Pathol (2008)

Bottom Line: This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions.Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS.Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Histopathology Department, Ampath National Laboratory Support Services, Johannesburg, South Africa. wayne.grayson@live.com

ABSTRACT
This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions. Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS. Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Nodular Kaposi sarcoma showing a peripheral component at higher magnification reminiscent of a cavernous hemangioma (H&E stain).
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Figure 4: Nodular Kaposi sarcoma showing a peripheral component at higher magnification reminiscent of a cavernous hemangioma (H&E stain).

Mentions: The nodular form of KS usually poses no diagnostic difficulties. Occasionally, however, a small ulcerated nodular KS lesion may be mistaken for a pyogenic granuloma [1]. Nodular KS exhibits dermal expansion by a relatively circumscribed, variable cellular proliferation of neoplastic spindled cells arranged in fascicles (Figure 4) [1-4]. Erythrocytes are contained within slit-like channels between the individual spindled cells. Although careful inspection may reveal occasional mitoses, the lesional cells are relatively monomorphic. Hyaline globules are seen more readily, as is the phenomenon of autolumination. In larger punch biopsy or excision biopsy specimens, the dermis away from the tumor nodule frequently exhibits changes associated with plaque stage KS, thus supporting the notion that patch, plaque and nodular stage lesions form part of a morphologic continuum. The periphery of some nodular KS lesions may show more dilated vascular spaces, imparting a pattern that is strikingly reminiscent of a cavernous hemangioma (Figure 4) [2]. These larger, congested channels are an integral part of the lesion, as confirmed by positive immunohistochemical staining of the lining endothelial nuclei for HHV-8 latent nuclear antigen 1 (LNA-1).


Histological variants of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma.

Grayson W, Pantanowitz L - Diagn Pathol (2008)

Nodular Kaposi sarcoma showing a peripheral component at higher magnification reminiscent of a cavernous hemangioma (H&E stain).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2526984&req=5

Figure 4: Nodular Kaposi sarcoma showing a peripheral component at higher magnification reminiscent of a cavernous hemangioma (H&E stain).
Mentions: The nodular form of KS usually poses no diagnostic difficulties. Occasionally, however, a small ulcerated nodular KS lesion may be mistaken for a pyogenic granuloma [1]. Nodular KS exhibits dermal expansion by a relatively circumscribed, variable cellular proliferation of neoplastic spindled cells arranged in fascicles (Figure 4) [1-4]. Erythrocytes are contained within slit-like channels between the individual spindled cells. Although careful inspection may reveal occasional mitoses, the lesional cells are relatively monomorphic. Hyaline globules are seen more readily, as is the phenomenon of autolumination. In larger punch biopsy or excision biopsy specimens, the dermis away from the tumor nodule frequently exhibits changes associated with plaque stage KS, thus supporting the notion that patch, plaque and nodular stage lesions form part of a morphologic continuum. The periphery of some nodular KS lesions may show more dilated vascular spaces, imparting a pattern that is strikingly reminiscent of a cavernous hemangioma (Figure 4) [2]. These larger, congested channels are an integral part of the lesion, as confirmed by positive immunohistochemical staining of the lining endothelial nuclei for HHV-8 latent nuclear antigen 1 (LNA-1).

Bottom Line: This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions.Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS.Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Histopathology Department, Ampath National Laboratory Support Services, Johannesburg, South Africa. wayne.grayson@live.com

ABSTRACT
This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions. Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS. Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus