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Histological variants of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma.

Grayson W, Pantanowitz L - Diagn Pathol (2008)

Bottom Line: This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions.Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS.Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Histopathology Department, Ampath National Laboratory Support Services, Johannesburg, South Africa. wayne.grayson@live.com

ABSTRACT
This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions. Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS. Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A completely regressed Kaposi sarcoma lesion still retains a modest amount of abnormal dermal microvessels, as evidenced by this D2-40 immunostain. D2-40 is a marker of lymphatic endothelium.
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Figure 21: A completely regressed Kaposi sarcoma lesion still retains a modest amount of abnormal dermal microvessels, as evidenced by this D2-40 immunostain. D2-40 is a marker of lymphatic endothelium.

Mentions: The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) may lead to complete regression of established AIDS-associated KS lesions [53,54]. Clinical features of regression include flattening of lesions, reduction in lesion size, and change from a purple-red appearance to an orange-brown macule. Following antiretroviral therapy, investigators have observed improved circumscription of nodular lesions, which appear less cellular and are enveloped by a densely sclerotic stroma [55]. In some cases the only significant abnormalities are an increase in dermal capillary density around native dermal vessels and appendages (Figure 19), and an accompanying perivascular infiltrate of largely plasma cells (Figure 20). Partial or complete regression of KS lesions may also be brought about following the administration of chemotherapeutic agents [56,57]. Histologic examination of such partially regressed lesions reveals residual spindled cells around native vessels in the mid- and upper dermis, and a significant reduction in the number of spindled lesional cells in the intervening dermis [56]. Lesions that have undergone complete regression, however, show an absence of these spindled cells, and a modest increase in microvessels (Figure 21) in relation to the superficial vascular plexus [56]. Other findings include the presence of hemosiderin-laden dermal macrophages and a conspicuous superficial perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate [56].


Histological variants of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma.

Grayson W, Pantanowitz L - Diagn Pathol (2008)

A completely regressed Kaposi sarcoma lesion still retains a modest amount of abnormal dermal microvessels, as evidenced by this D2-40 immunostain. D2-40 is a marker of lymphatic endothelium.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2526984&req=5

Figure 21: A completely regressed Kaposi sarcoma lesion still retains a modest amount of abnormal dermal microvessels, as evidenced by this D2-40 immunostain. D2-40 is a marker of lymphatic endothelium.
Mentions: The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) may lead to complete regression of established AIDS-associated KS lesions [53,54]. Clinical features of regression include flattening of lesions, reduction in lesion size, and change from a purple-red appearance to an orange-brown macule. Following antiretroviral therapy, investigators have observed improved circumscription of nodular lesions, which appear less cellular and are enveloped by a densely sclerotic stroma [55]. In some cases the only significant abnormalities are an increase in dermal capillary density around native dermal vessels and appendages (Figure 19), and an accompanying perivascular infiltrate of largely plasma cells (Figure 20). Partial or complete regression of KS lesions may also be brought about following the administration of chemotherapeutic agents [56,57]. Histologic examination of such partially regressed lesions reveals residual spindled cells around native vessels in the mid- and upper dermis, and a significant reduction in the number of spindled lesional cells in the intervening dermis [56]. Lesions that have undergone complete regression, however, show an absence of these spindled cells, and a modest increase in microvessels (Figure 21) in relation to the superficial vascular plexus [56]. Other findings include the presence of hemosiderin-laden dermal macrophages and a conspicuous superficial perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate [56].

Bottom Line: This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions.Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS.Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Histopathology Department, Ampath National Laboratory Support Services, Johannesburg, South Africa. wayne.grayson@live.com

ABSTRACT
This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions. Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS. Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus