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Histological variants of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma.

Grayson W, Pantanowitz L - Diagn Pathol (2008)

Bottom Line: This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions.Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS.Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Histopathology Department, Ampath National Laboratory Support Services, Johannesburg, South Africa. wayne.grayson@live.com

ABSTRACT
This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions. Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS. Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hyperkeratotic (verrucous) Kaposi sarcoma. A plaque stage lesion from the lower leg is surfaced by an epidermis showing verruciform acanthosis and hyperkeratosis, with fibrosis of the upper dermis (H&E stain).
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Figure 13: Hyperkeratotic (verrucous) Kaposi sarcoma. A plaque stage lesion from the lower leg is surfaced by an epidermis showing verruciform acanthosis and hyperkeratosis, with fibrosis of the upper dermis (H&E stain).

Mentions: Hyperkeratotic KS is a rarely described clinicopathalogic variant of KS, which appears to be closely linked to severe KS-associated lymphedema in patients with AIDS [10,35,44]. There is verrucous epidermal acanthosis and hyperkeratosis overlying an often fibrotic epidermis (Figure 13). In view of the latter feature, diagnostic KS lesional tissue may be located at a relatively deeper level in the dermis, further emphasizing the potential inadequacy of superficial shave biopsies. On occasion, verrucoid epidermal changes may occur with LLKS histology (Figure 14). Infrequently, such changes may involve the entire lower extremity manifesting as elephantiasis nostras verrucosa [45]. Chronic lymphedema may itself give rise to verruciform epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis, with increased fibroblastic activity, blood vessels and thick-walled lymphatic vessels throughout the dermis [39]. Lympedematous AIDS-associated KS may also be associated with exophytic fibroma-like nodules, characterized by dermal fibrosis, a loose arrangement of fibroblasts and collagen bundles, and dilated blood vessels and lymphatic channels [10,39,44].


Histological variants of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma.

Grayson W, Pantanowitz L - Diagn Pathol (2008)

Hyperkeratotic (verrucous) Kaposi sarcoma. A plaque stage lesion from the lower leg is surfaced by an epidermis showing verruciform acanthosis and hyperkeratosis, with fibrosis of the upper dermis (H&E stain).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2526984&req=5

Figure 13: Hyperkeratotic (verrucous) Kaposi sarcoma. A plaque stage lesion from the lower leg is surfaced by an epidermis showing verruciform acanthosis and hyperkeratosis, with fibrosis of the upper dermis (H&E stain).
Mentions: Hyperkeratotic KS is a rarely described clinicopathalogic variant of KS, which appears to be closely linked to severe KS-associated lymphedema in patients with AIDS [10,35,44]. There is verrucous epidermal acanthosis and hyperkeratosis overlying an often fibrotic epidermis (Figure 13). In view of the latter feature, diagnostic KS lesional tissue may be located at a relatively deeper level in the dermis, further emphasizing the potential inadequacy of superficial shave biopsies. On occasion, verrucoid epidermal changes may occur with LLKS histology (Figure 14). Infrequently, such changes may involve the entire lower extremity manifesting as elephantiasis nostras verrucosa [45]. Chronic lymphedema may itself give rise to verruciform epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis, with increased fibroblastic activity, blood vessels and thick-walled lymphatic vessels throughout the dermis [39]. Lympedematous AIDS-associated KS may also be associated with exophytic fibroma-like nodules, characterized by dermal fibrosis, a loose arrangement of fibroblasts and collagen bundles, and dilated blood vessels and lymphatic channels [10,39,44].

Bottom Line: This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions.Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS.Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Histopathology Department, Ampath National Laboratory Support Services, Johannesburg, South Africa. wayne.grayson@live.com

ABSTRACT
This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions. Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS. Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus