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Rare association of thymoma, myasthenia gravis and sarcoidosis : a case report.

Kurukumbi M, Weir RL, Kalyanam J, Nasim M, Jayam-Trouth A - J Med Case Rep (2008)

Bottom Line: When two or more diseases of undetermined origin are found together, several interesting questions are raised.It is important to first confirm the diagnoses individually.Immunologic mechanisms triggering the occurrence of these diagnoses together, are difficult to address.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Howard University Hospital, Georgia Avenue NW, Washington, DC, USA. mohan311@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The association of thymoma with myasthenia gravis (MG) is well known. Thymoma with sarcoidosis however, is very rare. We presented an interesting case with coexisting thymoma, MG and sarcoidosis.

Case presentation: A 59-year-old female patient with a history of sarcoidosis was admitted to the hospital with a one-day history of sudden onset of right-sided partial ptosis and diplopia. Neurosarcoidosis with cranial nerve involvement was considered, but was ruled out by the clinical findings, and MG was confirmed by the positive tensilon test, electrophysiological findings and positive acetylcholine receptor binding antibodies. On further evaluation, a CT chest scan showed a left anterior mediastinal mass and bilateral lymphadenopathy. Post surgical diagnosis confirmed the thymoma and sarcoidosis in the lymph nodes.

Conclusion: When two or more diseases of undetermined origin are found together, several interesting questions are raised. It is important to first confirm the diagnoses individually. Immunologic mechanisms triggering the occurrence of these diagnoses together, are difficult to address. Although the coexistence of thymoma, MG and sarcoidosis may be coincidental, it is noteworthy to report this case because of the multiple interesting features observed as well as the rarity of occurrence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT chest image revealing large necrotic mass in the left anterior mediastinum and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy.
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Figure 2: CT chest image revealing large necrotic mass in the left anterior mediastinum and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy.

Mentions: During her hospital stay she developed respiratory distress and hypoxemia. A chest CT scan demonstrated a 7 cm necrotic mass in the left anterior mediastinum and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy (Figure 2). Pulmonary function tests revealed restrictive lung disease and moderately decreased diffusion capacity. Steroids were recommended for the active sarcoidosis, which the patient declined.


Rare association of thymoma, myasthenia gravis and sarcoidosis : a case report.

Kurukumbi M, Weir RL, Kalyanam J, Nasim M, Jayam-Trouth A - J Med Case Rep (2008)

CT chest image revealing large necrotic mass in the left anterior mediastinum and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2500026&req=5

Figure 2: CT chest image revealing large necrotic mass in the left anterior mediastinum and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy.
Mentions: During her hospital stay she developed respiratory distress and hypoxemia. A chest CT scan demonstrated a 7 cm necrotic mass in the left anterior mediastinum and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy (Figure 2). Pulmonary function tests revealed restrictive lung disease and moderately decreased diffusion capacity. Steroids were recommended for the active sarcoidosis, which the patient declined.

Bottom Line: When two or more diseases of undetermined origin are found together, several interesting questions are raised.It is important to first confirm the diagnoses individually.Immunologic mechanisms triggering the occurrence of these diagnoses together, are difficult to address.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Howard University Hospital, Georgia Avenue NW, Washington, DC, USA. mohan311@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The association of thymoma with myasthenia gravis (MG) is well known. Thymoma with sarcoidosis however, is very rare. We presented an interesting case with coexisting thymoma, MG and sarcoidosis.

Case presentation: A 59-year-old female patient with a history of sarcoidosis was admitted to the hospital with a one-day history of sudden onset of right-sided partial ptosis and diplopia. Neurosarcoidosis with cranial nerve involvement was considered, but was ruled out by the clinical findings, and MG was confirmed by the positive tensilon test, electrophysiological findings and positive acetylcholine receptor binding antibodies. On further evaluation, a CT chest scan showed a left anterior mediastinal mass and bilateral lymphadenopathy. Post surgical diagnosis confirmed the thymoma and sarcoidosis in the lymph nodes.

Conclusion: When two or more diseases of undetermined origin are found together, several interesting questions are raised. It is important to first confirm the diagnoses individually. Immunologic mechanisms triggering the occurrence of these diagnoses together, are difficult to address. Although the coexistence of thymoma, MG and sarcoidosis may be coincidental, it is noteworthy to report this case because of the multiple interesting features observed as well as the rarity of occurrence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus