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Takayasu's Arteritis presenting as a dissecting aortic aneurysm history: a case report.

O'Connor MB, Murphy E, O'Donovan N, Murphy M, Phelan MJ, Regan MJ - Cases J (2008)

Bottom Line: First described in the 1800's, this rare condition is more commonly found in Asian women in their 40's.A diagnosis of cervical cancer quickly followed.This case report highlights that a differential diagnosis should never be dispelled based upon a "typical" history.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The Department of Medicine, South Infirmary - Victoria University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. mortimeroconnor@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Takayasu's Arteritis, formerly known as "pulseless disease", is a chronic idiopathic vasculitis which affects the large vessels in the body. First described in the 1800's, this rare condition is more commonly found in Asian women in their 40's. The aorta and its main branches are the primary vessels affected, with the most typical features reflected as ischemia or aneurysm formation. With Takayasu's Arteritis being a rare condition and its acute phase presentation often similar to other conditions, diagnosis is often difficult.

Case presentation: A 48 year old Irish Caucasian female, who presented as a typical history of an aortic dissection (chest pain radiating to her back in an interscapular region and a systolic blood pressure differential of 50 mmHg between her right and left upper limbs), was investigated with a number of imaging modalities and diagnosed with Takayasu's Arteritis, involving arteries affecting a number of organs. She was treated as per protocol for Takayasu's Arteritis. A diagnosis of cervical cancer quickly followed.

Conclusion: This case report highlights that a differential diagnosis should never be dispelled based upon a "typical" history. The importance of modern day imaging techniques such as CT, MRI and angiography, can often be paramount to confirming a diagnosis and the extent of the pathology.A possible link between Takayasu's Arteritis and gynaecological malignancies may exist.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MRI showing complete occlusion of proximal 4 cm of left subclavian artery with retrograde filling via the left vertebral.
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Figure 1: MRI showing complete occlusion of proximal 4 cm of left subclavian artery with retrograde filling via the left vertebral.

Mentions: Coronary angiography, MRI angiography (Figure 1), along with angiography of the great vessels/aorta (Figures 2a, 2b) were carried out and these confirmed the diagnosis of TA. The coronary angiogram showed an occluded PV branch of the left circumflex artery. The ateriogram showed a long segmental left subclavian artery stenosis and a significant stenosis in the origin of the celiac artery Figure 3.


Takayasu's Arteritis presenting as a dissecting aortic aneurysm history: a case report.

O'Connor MB, Murphy E, O'Donovan N, Murphy M, Phelan MJ, Regan MJ - Cases J (2008)

MRI showing complete occlusion of proximal 4 cm of left subclavian artery with retrograde filling via the left vertebral.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2494540&req=5

Figure 1: MRI showing complete occlusion of proximal 4 cm of left subclavian artery with retrograde filling via the left vertebral.
Mentions: Coronary angiography, MRI angiography (Figure 1), along with angiography of the great vessels/aorta (Figures 2a, 2b) were carried out and these confirmed the diagnosis of TA. The coronary angiogram showed an occluded PV branch of the left circumflex artery. The ateriogram showed a long segmental left subclavian artery stenosis and a significant stenosis in the origin of the celiac artery Figure 3.

Bottom Line: First described in the 1800's, this rare condition is more commonly found in Asian women in their 40's.A diagnosis of cervical cancer quickly followed.This case report highlights that a differential diagnosis should never be dispelled based upon a "typical" history.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The Department of Medicine, South Infirmary - Victoria University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. mortimeroconnor@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Takayasu's Arteritis, formerly known as "pulseless disease", is a chronic idiopathic vasculitis which affects the large vessels in the body. First described in the 1800's, this rare condition is more commonly found in Asian women in their 40's. The aorta and its main branches are the primary vessels affected, with the most typical features reflected as ischemia or aneurysm formation. With Takayasu's Arteritis being a rare condition and its acute phase presentation often similar to other conditions, diagnosis is often difficult.

Case presentation: A 48 year old Irish Caucasian female, who presented as a typical history of an aortic dissection (chest pain radiating to her back in an interscapular region and a systolic blood pressure differential of 50 mmHg between her right and left upper limbs), was investigated with a number of imaging modalities and diagnosed with Takayasu's Arteritis, involving arteries affecting a number of organs. She was treated as per protocol for Takayasu's Arteritis. A diagnosis of cervical cancer quickly followed.

Conclusion: This case report highlights that a differential diagnosis should never be dispelled based upon a "typical" history. The importance of modern day imaging techniques such as CT, MRI and angiography, can often be paramount to confirming a diagnosis and the extent of the pathology.A possible link between Takayasu's Arteritis and gynaecological malignancies may exist.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus