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Delayed treatment of diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis in Taiwan.

Chern JP, Chen DR, Wen TH - BMC Public Health (2008)

Bottom Line: The long tail of the power-law distribution indicated that an extreme number occur cannot be neglected.This study found that TB control is generally acceptable in Taiwan; however, delayed treatment increases the risk of transmission.Improving the protocol for managing confirmed TB cases can minimize disease transmission.

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Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Tao-Yuan General Hospital, Taiwan. jimmy.chern@msa.hinet.net

ABSTRACT

Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is an ongoing public health problem in Taiwan. The National Tuberculosis Registry Campaign, a case management system, was implemented in 1997. This study examined this monitoring system to identify and characterize delayed treatment of TB patients.

Methods: Records of all tuberculosis cases treated in Taiwan from 2002 through 2005 were obtained from the National Tuberculosis Registry Campaign. Initiation of treatment more than 7 days after diagnosis was considered a long treatment delay.

Results: The study included 31,937 patients. The mean day of delayed treatment was 3.6 days. Most patients were treated immediately after diagnosis. The relationship between number of TB patients and days of delayed treatment after diagnosis exhibited a Power-law distribution. The long tail of the power-law distribution indicated that an extreme number occur cannot be neglected. Tuberculosis patients treated after an unusually long delay require close observation and follow up.

Conclusion: This study found that TB control is generally acceptable in Taiwan; however, delayed treatment increases the risk of transmission. Improving the protocol for managing confirmed TB cases can minimize disease transmission.

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Number of TB patients and days of treatment delay (2004). Power-law distribution test, P < 0.001.
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Figure 3: Number of TB patients and days of treatment delay (2004). Power-law distribution test, P < 0.001.


Delayed treatment of diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis in Taiwan.

Chern JP, Chen DR, Wen TH - BMC Public Health (2008)

Number of TB patients and days of treatment delay (2004). Power-law distribution test, P < 0.001.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2483710&req=5

Figure 3: Number of TB patients and days of treatment delay (2004). Power-law distribution test, P < 0.001.
Bottom Line: The long tail of the power-law distribution indicated that an extreme number occur cannot be neglected.This study found that TB control is generally acceptable in Taiwan; however, delayed treatment increases the risk of transmission.Improving the protocol for managing confirmed TB cases can minimize disease transmission.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Tao-Yuan General Hospital, Taiwan. jimmy.chern@msa.hinet.net

ABSTRACT

Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is an ongoing public health problem in Taiwan. The National Tuberculosis Registry Campaign, a case management system, was implemented in 1997. This study examined this monitoring system to identify and characterize delayed treatment of TB patients.

Methods: Records of all tuberculosis cases treated in Taiwan from 2002 through 2005 were obtained from the National Tuberculosis Registry Campaign. Initiation of treatment more than 7 days after diagnosis was considered a long treatment delay.

Results: The study included 31,937 patients. The mean day of delayed treatment was 3.6 days. Most patients were treated immediately after diagnosis. The relationship between number of TB patients and days of delayed treatment after diagnosis exhibited a Power-law distribution. The long tail of the power-law distribution indicated that an extreme number occur cannot be neglected. Tuberculosis patients treated after an unusually long delay require close observation and follow up.

Conclusion: This study found that TB control is generally acceptable in Taiwan; however, delayed treatment increases the risk of transmission. Improving the protocol for managing confirmed TB cases can minimize disease transmission.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus