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A framework for addressing the global obesity epidemic locally: the Child Health Ecological Surveillance System (CHESS).

Plotnikoff RC, Lightfoot P, Spinola C, Predy G, Barrett L - Prev Chronic Dis (2008)

Bottom Line: Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in the developed world.This prototype could potentially be used in other jurisdictions to address other child health issues.We present 8 guiding principles for the development and implementation of a regional framework for action.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, 5-10 University Extension Centre, 8303-112 Street, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2T4. ron.plotnikoff@ualberta.ca

ABSTRACT
Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in the developed world. Recent research and commentary suggest that an ecological approach is required to address childhood obesity, given the multidimensional nature of the problem. We propose a Canadian prototype, the Child Health Ecological Surveillance System, for a regional health authority to address the growing obesity epidemic. This prototype could potentially be used in other jurisdictions to address other child health issues. We present 8 guiding principles for the development and implementation of a regional framework for action.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Framework for Action on Healthy Body Weight in Children
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Framework for Action on Healthy Body Weight in Children

Mentions: The Framework for Action on Healthy Body Weight in Children (the Framework) (Figure) emerged from a synthesis of both the literature (15-23) and our survey findings. The Framework depicts the key ingredients required to advance knowledge and guide action by those with clinical and population health accountabilities in the prevention and treatment of obesity in children. The Framework is based on the four-step approach of the World Health Organization (24) for action on a public health problem with a multifactor and complex etiology: 1) surveillance (i.e., What’s the problem?), 2) risk factor or condition identification (i.e., What’s the cause?), 3) intervention and evaluation (i.e., What works?), and 4) implementation (i.e., How do you do it?). Other components — leadership, will to act, and infrastructure — are the cornerstones of capacity to implement these approaches (25,26).


A framework for addressing the global obesity epidemic locally: the Child Health Ecological Surveillance System (CHESS).

Plotnikoff RC, Lightfoot P, Spinola C, Predy G, Barrett L - Prev Chronic Dis (2008)

Framework for Action on Healthy Body Weight in Children
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2483540&req=5

Figure 1: Framework for Action on Healthy Body Weight in Children
Mentions: The Framework for Action on Healthy Body Weight in Children (the Framework) (Figure) emerged from a synthesis of both the literature (15-23) and our survey findings. The Framework depicts the key ingredients required to advance knowledge and guide action by those with clinical and population health accountabilities in the prevention and treatment of obesity in children. The Framework is based on the four-step approach of the World Health Organization (24) for action on a public health problem with a multifactor and complex etiology: 1) surveillance (i.e., What’s the problem?), 2) risk factor or condition identification (i.e., What’s the cause?), 3) intervention and evaluation (i.e., What works?), and 4) implementation (i.e., How do you do it?). Other components — leadership, will to act, and infrastructure — are the cornerstones of capacity to implement these approaches (25,26).

Bottom Line: Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in the developed world.This prototype could potentially be used in other jurisdictions to address other child health issues.We present 8 guiding principles for the development and implementation of a regional framework for action.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, 5-10 University Extension Centre, 8303-112 Street, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2T4. ron.plotnikoff@ualberta.ca

ABSTRACT
Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in the developed world. Recent research and commentary suggest that an ecological approach is required to address childhood obesity, given the multidimensional nature of the problem. We propose a Canadian prototype, the Child Health Ecological Surveillance System, for a regional health authority to address the growing obesity epidemic. This prototype could potentially be used in other jurisdictions to address other child health issues. We present 8 guiding principles for the development and implementation of a regional framework for action.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus