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GenOVa: a computer program to generate orientational variants.

Cayron C - J Appl Crystallogr (2007)

Bottom Line: A computer program called GenOVa, written in Python, calculates the orientational variants, the operators (special types of misorientations between variants) and the composition table associated with a groupoid structure.The variants can be represented by three-dimensional shapes or by pole figures.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CEA-Grenoble, DRT/LITEN, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, France.

ABSTRACT
A computer program called GenOVa, written in Python, calculates the orientational variants, the operators (special types of misorientations between variants) and the composition table associated with a groupoid structure. The variants can be represented by three-dimensional shapes or by pole figures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pole figure representation of the parent crystal and its daughter variants for two phase transformations: (a) for the Burgers transformation, the 〈101〉β and 〈101〉α directions are projected, and (b) for the martensitic transformation with a KS orientation relationship, the 〈111〉γ and 〈111〉α directions are projected. The normal, horizontal and vertical directions for the pole figures are the [111], [01] and [11] directions of the parent crystal.
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fig5: Pole figure representation of the parent crystal and its daughter variants for two phase transformations: (a) for the Burgers transformation, the 〈101〉β and 〈101〉α directions are projected, and (b) for the martensitic transformation with a KS orientation relationship, the 〈111〉γ and 〈111〉α directions are projected. The normal, horizontal and vertical directions for the pole figures are the [111], [01] and [11] directions of the parent crystal.

Mentions: The ‘Variants in 3D’ button allows us to draw the variant crystals in an orientation relationship with their parent crystal in three dimensions. This part was written with Soya 3D, a free object-oriented three-dimensional engine for Python developed by Lamy (2005 ▶). Until now, cubic crystals have been represented only by cubes or regular tetrahedra, hexagonal crystals by hexagonal prisms, and crystals with other point groups by their unit cells. Two examples are given in Fig. 4 ▶, one for Burgers transition and one for martensitic transition with a Kurdjumov–Sachs (KS) orientation relationship. The size and positions of the variants can be modified, the orientation can be automatically or manually controlled, and the light parameters can be adapted. The ‘Pole Figure’ button allows pole figures of the parent and variant crystals to be drawn in stereographic or equal-area projection modes. Here again, the parent crystal can be oriented manually, or by choosing the normal and horizontal directions, or by choosing its Euler angles. The directions that are projected can be independently chosen for the parent and daughter phases. Two examples are given in Fig. 5 ▶ for Burgers transition and for martensitic transition with a KS orientation relationship. The ‘Electron Diffraction’ button will allow the simulation of complex TEM diffraction patterns. This module is under development. A first version working with EMS (Stadelmann, 1987 ▶; http://cimewww.epfl.ch/people/stadelmann/jemsWebSite/jems.html) was programmed by Cayron (2000 ▶), but that work was based on incomplete theory and some modifications are required to implement links with JEMS, the new version of EMS.


GenOVa: a computer program to generate orientational variants.

Cayron C - J Appl Crystallogr (2007)

Pole figure representation of the parent crystal and its daughter variants for two phase transformations: (a) for the Burgers transformation, the 〈101〉β and 〈101〉α directions are projected, and (b) for the martensitic transformation with a KS orientation relationship, the 〈111〉γ and 〈111〉α directions are projected. The normal, horizontal and vertical directions for the pole figures are the [111], [01] and [11] directions of the parent crystal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2483482&req=5

fig5: Pole figure representation of the parent crystal and its daughter variants for two phase transformations: (a) for the Burgers transformation, the 〈101〉β and 〈101〉α directions are projected, and (b) for the martensitic transformation with a KS orientation relationship, the 〈111〉γ and 〈111〉α directions are projected. The normal, horizontal and vertical directions for the pole figures are the [111], [01] and [11] directions of the parent crystal.
Mentions: The ‘Variants in 3D’ button allows us to draw the variant crystals in an orientation relationship with their parent crystal in three dimensions. This part was written with Soya 3D, a free object-oriented three-dimensional engine for Python developed by Lamy (2005 ▶). Until now, cubic crystals have been represented only by cubes or regular tetrahedra, hexagonal crystals by hexagonal prisms, and crystals with other point groups by their unit cells. Two examples are given in Fig. 4 ▶, one for Burgers transition and one for martensitic transition with a Kurdjumov–Sachs (KS) orientation relationship. The size and positions of the variants can be modified, the orientation can be automatically or manually controlled, and the light parameters can be adapted. The ‘Pole Figure’ button allows pole figures of the parent and variant crystals to be drawn in stereographic or equal-area projection modes. Here again, the parent crystal can be oriented manually, or by choosing the normal and horizontal directions, or by choosing its Euler angles. The directions that are projected can be independently chosen for the parent and daughter phases. Two examples are given in Fig. 5 ▶ for Burgers transition and for martensitic transition with a KS orientation relationship. The ‘Electron Diffraction’ button will allow the simulation of complex TEM diffraction patterns. This module is under development. A first version working with EMS (Stadelmann, 1987 ▶; http://cimewww.epfl.ch/people/stadelmann/jemsWebSite/jems.html) was programmed by Cayron (2000 ▶), but that work was based on incomplete theory and some modifications are required to implement links with JEMS, the new version of EMS.

Bottom Line: A computer program called GenOVa, written in Python, calculates the orientational variants, the operators (special types of misorientations between variants) and the composition table associated with a groupoid structure.The variants can be represented by three-dimensional shapes or by pole figures.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CEA-Grenoble, DRT/LITEN, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, France.

ABSTRACT
A computer program called GenOVa, written in Python, calculates the orientational variants, the operators (special types of misorientations between variants) and the composition table associated with a groupoid structure. The variants can be represented by three-dimensional shapes or by pole figures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus