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A fruitful outcome to the papaya genome project.

Wei F, Wing RA - Genome Biol. (2008)

Bottom Line: The draft genome sequence of a transgenic virus-resistant papaya marks the first genome sequence of a commercially important transgenic crop plant.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Sciences and the Arizona Genomics Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

ABSTRACT
The draft genome sequence of a transgenic virus-resistant papaya marks the first genome sequence of a commercially important transgenic crop plant.

Show MeSH
Field trial of transgenic papaya. The disease free transgenic papaya plants (the right side) and the severely infected and stunted non-transgenic papaya plants (the left side) growing in adjoining plots. Image courtesy of Stephen A Ferreira (University of Hawaii). Image courtesy of [23]
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Figure 2: Field trial of transgenic papaya. The disease free transgenic papaya plants (the right side) and the severely infected and stunted non-transgenic papaya plants (the left side) growing in adjoining plots. Image courtesy of Stephen A Ferreira (University of Hawaii). Image courtesy of [23]

Mentions: The nice thing about working with some plant genomes is that at the end of the day you can eat the fruits of your work. Originating from Central and South America, the papaya (Carica papaya) bears highly nutritious and delicious fruit and is also a source of papain - a protease used for centuries to tenderize meat. Papaya trees can grow 5-10 meters tall, with large leaves 50-70 cm in diameter and fruits 15-45 cm long and 10-30 cm in diameter (Figure 1). The papaya is grown as a crop in tropical and subtropical regions, but its cultivation has been severely hampered by the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) (Figure 2). In Hawaii, papaya cultivation was almost completely destroyed by the virus until the introduction of virus-resistant transgenic lines in 1998. Now 80% of the Hawaiian papaya crop is transgenic [1]. A draft genome sequence and analysis of the transgenic papaya variety 'SunUp' has now been published by Ray Ming and co-workers [2].


A fruitful outcome to the papaya genome project.

Wei F, Wing RA - Genome Biol. (2008)

Field trial of transgenic papaya. The disease free transgenic papaya plants (the right side) and the severely infected and stunted non-transgenic papaya plants (the left side) growing in adjoining plots. Image courtesy of Stephen A Ferreira (University of Hawaii). Image courtesy of [23]
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2481413&req=5

Figure 2: Field trial of transgenic papaya. The disease free transgenic papaya plants (the right side) and the severely infected and stunted non-transgenic papaya plants (the left side) growing in adjoining plots. Image courtesy of Stephen A Ferreira (University of Hawaii). Image courtesy of [23]
Mentions: The nice thing about working with some plant genomes is that at the end of the day you can eat the fruits of your work. Originating from Central and South America, the papaya (Carica papaya) bears highly nutritious and delicious fruit and is also a source of papain - a protease used for centuries to tenderize meat. Papaya trees can grow 5-10 meters tall, with large leaves 50-70 cm in diameter and fruits 15-45 cm long and 10-30 cm in diameter (Figure 1). The papaya is grown as a crop in tropical and subtropical regions, but its cultivation has been severely hampered by the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) (Figure 2). In Hawaii, papaya cultivation was almost completely destroyed by the virus until the introduction of virus-resistant transgenic lines in 1998. Now 80% of the Hawaiian papaya crop is transgenic [1]. A draft genome sequence and analysis of the transgenic papaya variety 'SunUp' has now been published by Ray Ming and co-workers [2].

Bottom Line: The draft genome sequence of a transgenic virus-resistant papaya marks the first genome sequence of a commercially important transgenic crop plant.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Sciences and the Arizona Genomics Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

ABSTRACT
The draft genome sequence of a transgenic virus-resistant papaya marks the first genome sequence of a commercially important transgenic crop plant.

Show MeSH