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Health and economic impact of HPV 16 and 18 vaccination and cervical cancer screening in India.

Diaz M, Kim JJ, Albero G, de Sanjosé S, Clifford G, Bosch FX, Goldie SJ - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

Bottom Line: We estimated the potential health and economic impact of different cervical cancer prevention strategies.Screening differed by test (cytology, visual inspection, HPV DNA testing), number of clinical visits (1, 2 or 3), frequency (1 x , 2 x , 3 x per lifetime), and age range (35-45).Vaccine efficacy, coverage, and costs were varied in sensitivity analyses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Infections and Cancer (UNIC), Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Av. Gran Via, s/n km. 2.7, 08907 L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer death among women in low-income countries, with approximately 25% of cases worldwide occurring in India. We estimated the potential health and economic impact of different cervical cancer prevention strategies. After empirically calibrating a cervical cancer model to country-specific epidemiologic data, we projected cancer incidence, life expectancy, and lifetime costs (I$2005), and calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (I$/YLS) for the following strategies: pre-adolescent vaccination of girls before age 12, screening of women over age 30, and combined vaccination and screening. Screening differed by test (cytology, visual inspection, HPV DNA testing), number of clinical visits (1, 2 or 3), frequency (1 x , 2 x , 3 x per lifetime), and age range (35-45). Vaccine efficacy, coverage, and costs were varied in sensitivity analyses. Assuming 70% coverage, mean reduction in lifetime cancer risk was 44% (range, 28-57%) with HPV 16,18 vaccination alone, and 21-33% with screening three times per lifetime. Combining vaccination and screening three times per lifetime provided a mean reduction of 56% (vaccination plus 3-visit conventional cytology) to 63% (vaccination plus 2-visit HPV DNA testing). At a cost per vaccinated girl of I$10 (per dose cost of $2), pre-adolescent vaccination followed by screening three times per lifetime using either VIA or HPV DNA testing, would be considered cost-effective using the country's per capita gross domestic product (I$3452) as a threshold. In India, if high coverage of pre-adolescent girls with a low-cost HPV vaccine that provides long-term protection is achievable, vaccination followed by screening three times per lifetime is expected to reduce cancer deaths by half, and be cost-effective.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Reduction in lifetime risk of cervical cancer. The mean reduction in lifetime risk of cervical cancer is shown with strategies using either vaccination or screening (upper panel), and strategies combining both vaccination and screening (lower panel). The range represents the minimum and maximum reductions achieved for each strategy across the good-fitting parameter sets.
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fig2: Reduction in lifetime risk of cervical cancer. The mean reduction in lifetime risk of cervical cancer is shown with strategies using either vaccination or screening (upper panel), and strategies combining both vaccination and screening (lower panel). The range represents the minimum and maximum reductions achieved for each strategy across the good-fitting parameter sets.

Mentions: Pre-adolescent vaccination alone reduced cancer incidence by 44% (range, 28–57%) and was more effective than screening alone (Figure 2, upper panel). A combined approach of pre-adolescent vaccination and screening of adult women was more effective than either alone (Figure 2, lower panel). The relative differences between individual testing strategies were attenuated in the presence of widespread vaccination.


Health and economic impact of HPV 16 and 18 vaccination and cervical cancer screening in India.

Diaz M, Kim JJ, Albero G, de Sanjosé S, Clifford G, Bosch FX, Goldie SJ - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

Reduction in lifetime risk of cervical cancer. The mean reduction in lifetime risk of cervical cancer is shown with strategies using either vaccination or screening (upper panel), and strategies combining both vaccination and screening (lower panel). The range represents the minimum and maximum reductions achieved for each strategy across the good-fitting parameter sets.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2480962&req=5

fig2: Reduction in lifetime risk of cervical cancer. The mean reduction in lifetime risk of cervical cancer is shown with strategies using either vaccination or screening (upper panel), and strategies combining both vaccination and screening (lower panel). The range represents the minimum and maximum reductions achieved for each strategy across the good-fitting parameter sets.
Mentions: Pre-adolescent vaccination alone reduced cancer incidence by 44% (range, 28–57%) and was more effective than screening alone (Figure 2, upper panel). A combined approach of pre-adolescent vaccination and screening of adult women was more effective than either alone (Figure 2, lower panel). The relative differences between individual testing strategies were attenuated in the presence of widespread vaccination.

Bottom Line: We estimated the potential health and economic impact of different cervical cancer prevention strategies.Screening differed by test (cytology, visual inspection, HPV DNA testing), number of clinical visits (1, 2 or 3), frequency (1 x , 2 x , 3 x per lifetime), and age range (35-45).Vaccine efficacy, coverage, and costs were varied in sensitivity analyses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Infections and Cancer (UNIC), Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Av. Gran Via, s/n km. 2.7, 08907 L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer death among women in low-income countries, with approximately 25% of cases worldwide occurring in India. We estimated the potential health and economic impact of different cervical cancer prevention strategies. After empirically calibrating a cervical cancer model to country-specific epidemiologic data, we projected cancer incidence, life expectancy, and lifetime costs (I$2005), and calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (I$/YLS) for the following strategies: pre-adolescent vaccination of girls before age 12, screening of women over age 30, and combined vaccination and screening. Screening differed by test (cytology, visual inspection, HPV DNA testing), number of clinical visits (1, 2 or 3), frequency (1 x , 2 x , 3 x per lifetime), and age range (35-45). Vaccine efficacy, coverage, and costs were varied in sensitivity analyses. Assuming 70% coverage, mean reduction in lifetime cancer risk was 44% (range, 28-57%) with HPV 16,18 vaccination alone, and 21-33% with screening three times per lifetime. Combining vaccination and screening three times per lifetime provided a mean reduction of 56% (vaccination plus 3-visit conventional cytology) to 63% (vaccination plus 2-visit HPV DNA testing). At a cost per vaccinated girl of I$10 (per dose cost of $2), pre-adolescent vaccination followed by screening three times per lifetime using either VIA or HPV DNA testing, would be considered cost-effective using the country's per capita gross domestic product (I$3452) as a threshold. In India, if high coverage of pre-adolescent girls with a low-cost HPV vaccine that provides long-term protection is achievable, vaccination followed by screening three times per lifetime is expected to reduce cancer deaths by half, and be cost-effective.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus