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Action-specific cognitions of planned and preparatory behaviors of condom use among Dutch adolescents.

van Empelen P, Kok G - Arch Sex Behav (2008)

Bottom Line: An important reason for their failure to use condoms is that they do not prepare themselves for potential sexual encounters.In a sample of 399 secondary school students, including students with and without sexual experience, it was found that intended condom use was not sufficient to ensure that adolescents plan and prepare for condom use.It was found that having the goal of condom use did not necessarily result in preparatory behavior, such as condom buying and condom carrying.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Psychological Research, Department of Clinical, Health and Neuropsychology, Leiden University, PO Box 9555, 2300 RB, Leiden, The Netherlands. P.vanEmpelen@fsw.LeidenUniv.nl

ABSTRACT
Many adolescents fail to use condoms, even when they are motivated to do so. An important reason for their failure to use condoms is that they do not prepare themselves for potential sexual encounters. The present study examined the circumstances under which Dutch adolescents were likely to prepare themselves for condom use (buying and carrying). In a sample of 399 secondary school students, including students with and without sexual experience, it was found that intended condom use was not sufficient to ensure that adolescents plan and prepare for condom use. It was found that having the goal of condom use did not necessarily result in preparatory behavior, such as condom buying and condom carrying. The data showed that action-specific social-cognitive factors of preparatory behavior explained preparatory behavior, beyond the decision to use condoms. This suggests that interventions aimed at promoting condom use should focus not only on condom use itself, but should also motivate and encourage adolescents to buy and carry condoms.

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Summarized model of condom preparatory actions. I = intention; Att = Attitude; In = injunctive norm; Se = self-efficacy; Dn = descriptive norm; Pn = Personal norm; Aa = Anticipated affect. Subscripts: sp = steady partner, cp = casual partner, b = condom buying, c = condom carrying
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Fig2: Summarized model of condom preparatory actions. I = intention; Att = Attitude; In = injunctive norm; Se = self-efficacy; Dn = descriptive norm; Pn = Personal norm; Aa = Anticipated affect. Subscripts: sp = steady partner, cp = casual partner, b = condom buying, c = condom carrying

Mentions: In the present study, we studied the sequence of steps that adolescents need to take to attain the goal of using condoms and their action-specific cognitions. The steps examined were: deciding to use condoms, buying condoms, and carrying condoms. We attempted to demonstrate that there was a logical sequence of steps and that simply focusing on intended condom use as the most proximal antecedent of condom use is not necessarily sufficient. We showed that having a positive intention to use condoms did not necessarily lead to buying and carrying condoms, the behaviors that have been shown to be very important in achieving condom use (Bryan et al., 2002; Sheeran, Orbell, & Abraham, 1999; van Empelen & Kok, 2006). In examining the sequence of steps, intended condom use did explain intended condom buying, but it did not predict actual buying. It could be argued that the relationship between intended condom use and buying was mediated by intended buying, but the zero-order correlations suggest that this was not the case. In turn, when we examined condom carrying, intended carrying largely depended on intended buying, and not on intended condom use. Moreover, in explaining actual condom carrying, it was shown that carrying condoms was dependent on whether adolescents actually had bought condoms and intended to carry them. In sum, the results suggest that it is necessary to take into account specific preparatory actions, but that it is also essential to examine their specific cognitions (see Fig. 2 for a summarized model).Fig. 2


Action-specific cognitions of planned and preparatory behaviors of condom use among Dutch adolescents.

van Empelen P, Kok G - Arch Sex Behav (2008)

Summarized model of condom preparatory actions. I = intention; Att = Attitude; In = injunctive norm; Se = self-efficacy; Dn = descriptive norm; Pn = Personal norm; Aa = Anticipated affect. Subscripts: sp = steady partner, cp = casual partner, b = condom buying, c = condom carrying
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2480510&req=5

Fig2: Summarized model of condom preparatory actions. I = intention; Att = Attitude; In = injunctive norm; Se = self-efficacy; Dn = descriptive norm; Pn = Personal norm; Aa = Anticipated affect. Subscripts: sp = steady partner, cp = casual partner, b = condom buying, c = condom carrying
Mentions: In the present study, we studied the sequence of steps that adolescents need to take to attain the goal of using condoms and their action-specific cognitions. The steps examined were: deciding to use condoms, buying condoms, and carrying condoms. We attempted to demonstrate that there was a logical sequence of steps and that simply focusing on intended condom use as the most proximal antecedent of condom use is not necessarily sufficient. We showed that having a positive intention to use condoms did not necessarily lead to buying and carrying condoms, the behaviors that have been shown to be very important in achieving condom use (Bryan et al., 2002; Sheeran, Orbell, & Abraham, 1999; van Empelen & Kok, 2006). In examining the sequence of steps, intended condom use did explain intended condom buying, but it did not predict actual buying. It could be argued that the relationship between intended condom use and buying was mediated by intended buying, but the zero-order correlations suggest that this was not the case. In turn, when we examined condom carrying, intended carrying largely depended on intended buying, and not on intended condom use. Moreover, in explaining actual condom carrying, it was shown that carrying condoms was dependent on whether adolescents actually had bought condoms and intended to carry them. In sum, the results suggest that it is necessary to take into account specific preparatory actions, but that it is also essential to examine their specific cognitions (see Fig. 2 for a summarized model).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: An important reason for their failure to use condoms is that they do not prepare themselves for potential sexual encounters.In a sample of 399 secondary school students, including students with and without sexual experience, it was found that intended condom use was not sufficient to ensure that adolescents plan and prepare for condom use.It was found that having the goal of condom use did not necessarily result in preparatory behavior, such as condom buying and condom carrying.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Psychological Research, Department of Clinical, Health and Neuropsychology, Leiden University, PO Box 9555, 2300 RB, Leiden, The Netherlands. P.vanEmpelen@fsw.LeidenUniv.nl

ABSTRACT
Many adolescents fail to use condoms, even when they are motivated to do so. An important reason for their failure to use condoms is that they do not prepare themselves for potential sexual encounters. The present study examined the circumstances under which Dutch adolescents were likely to prepare themselves for condom use (buying and carrying). In a sample of 399 secondary school students, including students with and without sexual experience, it was found that intended condom use was not sufficient to ensure that adolescents plan and prepare for condom use. It was found that having the goal of condom use did not necessarily result in preparatory behavior, such as condom buying and condom carrying. The data showed that action-specific social-cognitive factors of preparatory behavior explained preparatory behavior, beyond the decision to use condoms. This suggests that interventions aimed at promoting condom use should focus not only on condom use itself, but should also motivate and encourage adolescents to buy and carry condoms.

Show MeSH