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Cerebral arterial air embolism in a child after intraosseous infusion.

van Rijn RR, Knoester H, Maes A, van der Wal AC, Kubat B - Emerg Radiol (2008)

Bottom Line: Cerebral arterial air embolism (CAAE) has been reported as a rare complication of medical intervention.There has been one reported case of CAAE after the use of an intraosseous infusion (IO) system.We report on a case of CAAE after tibial IO infusion in a 7-month-old girl during resuscitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre/Emma Children's Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. r.r.vanrijn@amc.uva.nl

ABSTRACT
Cerebral arterial air embolism (CAAE) has been reported as a rare complication of medical intervention. There has been one reported case of CAAE after the use of an intraosseous infusion (IO) system. We report on a case of CAAE after tibial IO infusion in a 7-month-old girl during resuscitation.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Intraosseous infusion needle correctly positioned within the proximal right tibial metaphysis
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Fig1: Intraosseous infusion needle correctly positioned within the proximal right tibial metaphysis

Mentions: At 5:00 a.m., she was pronounced deceased. Although the clinical history and findings during resuscitation suggested food aspiration, questions regarding the cause of death remained. Therefore, according to our battered child protocol, the standard radiographs, following the guidelines of the American College of Radiography were performed [1]. In addition, a head CT, which was a standard in our hospital in children under the age of 2 years with unexplained trauma/death, was performed within 1h after death. The skeletal radiographs showed no abnormalities, except for the IO infusion in the proximal right tibia (Fig. 1). Neither fractures nor signs of malnutrition were noted. The head CT, however, showed a considerable amount of air within the arterial circulation (Fig. 2).Fig. 1


Cerebral arterial air embolism in a child after intraosseous infusion.

van Rijn RR, Knoester H, Maes A, van der Wal AC, Kubat B - Emerg Radiol (2008)

Intraosseous infusion needle correctly positioned within the proximal right tibial metaphysis
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2480503&req=5

Fig1: Intraosseous infusion needle correctly positioned within the proximal right tibial metaphysis
Mentions: At 5:00 a.m., she was pronounced deceased. Although the clinical history and findings during resuscitation suggested food aspiration, questions regarding the cause of death remained. Therefore, according to our battered child protocol, the standard radiographs, following the guidelines of the American College of Radiography were performed [1]. In addition, a head CT, which was a standard in our hospital in children under the age of 2 years with unexplained trauma/death, was performed within 1h after death. The skeletal radiographs showed no abnormalities, except for the IO infusion in the proximal right tibia (Fig. 1). Neither fractures nor signs of malnutrition were noted. The head CT, however, showed a considerable amount of air within the arterial circulation (Fig. 2).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Cerebral arterial air embolism (CAAE) has been reported as a rare complication of medical intervention.There has been one reported case of CAAE after the use of an intraosseous infusion (IO) system.We report on a case of CAAE after tibial IO infusion in a 7-month-old girl during resuscitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre/Emma Children's Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. r.r.vanrijn@amc.uva.nl

ABSTRACT
Cerebral arterial air embolism (CAAE) has been reported as a rare complication of medical intervention. There has been one reported case of CAAE after the use of an intraosseous infusion (IO) system. We report on a case of CAAE after tibial IO infusion in a 7-month-old girl during resuscitation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus