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Dislocation of the fibular head in an unusual sports injury: a case report.

Ahmad R, Case R - J Med Case Rep (2008)

Bottom Line: He had a failed manipulation under anaesthesia and the joint needed an open reduction in which the fibular head was levered back into place.Operative findings revealed a horizontal type of joint.This dislocation was irreducible by a closed method.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Weston General Hospital, Grange Road, Uphill, UK. riazkanth@yahoo.co.uk

ABSTRACT

Introduction: One of the primary functions of the proximal tibiofibular joint is slight rotation to accommodate rotational stress at the ankle. Proximal tibiofibular joint dislocation is a rare injury and accounts for less than 1% of all knee injuries. This dislocation has been reported in patients who had been engaged in football, ballet dancing, equestrian jumping, parachuting and snowboarding.

Case presentation: A 20-year-old man was injured whilst playing football. He felt a pop in the right knee and was subsequently unable to bear weight on it. The range of movement in his knee joint was limited. Anterior-posterior and lateral X-rays of the knee revealed anterolateral dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint. Comparison views confirmed the anterolateral dislocation. He had a failed manipulation under anaesthesia and the joint needed an open reduction in which the fibular head was levered back into place. Operative findings revealed a horizontal type of joint.

Conclusion: An exceedingly rare dislocation of a horizontal type of proximal tibiofibular joint was presented following a football injury. This dislocation was irreducible by a closed method.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photograph of the knee showing anterolateral dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint.
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Figure 1: Photograph of the knee showing anterolateral dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint.

Mentions: A 20-year-old man was tackled whilst playing football. He felt a pop in the right knee and was subsequently unable to bear weight on it. He had a palpable bony lump in the anterolateral aspect of his knee and tenderness along the lateral joint line (Figure 1). The range of movement in his knee joint was limited. He had no effusion and there were no signs of ligament injury. Anterior-posterior and lateral X-rays of the knee revealed anterolateral dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint (Figure 2). Comparison views confirmed the anterolateral dislocation.


Dislocation of the fibular head in an unusual sports injury: a case report.

Ahmad R, Case R - J Med Case Rep (2008)

Photograph of the knee showing anterolateral dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2397423&req=5

Figure 1: Photograph of the knee showing anterolateral dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint.
Mentions: A 20-year-old man was tackled whilst playing football. He felt a pop in the right knee and was subsequently unable to bear weight on it. He had a palpable bony lump in the anterolateral aspect of his knee and tenderness along the lateral joint line (Figure 1). The range of movement in his knee joint was limited. He had no effusion and there were no signs of ligament injury. Anterior-posterior and lateral X-rays of the knee revealed anterolateral dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint (Figure 2). Comparison views confirmed the anterolateral dislocation.

Bottom Line: He had a failed manipulation under anaesthesia and the joint needed an open reduction in which the fibular head was levered back into place.Operative findings revealed a horizontal type of joint.This dislocation was irreducible by a closed method.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Weston General Hospital, Grange Road, Uphill, UK. riazkanth@yahoo.co.uk

ABSTRACT

Introduction: One of the primary functions of the proximal tibiofibular joint is slight rotation to accommodate rotational stress at the ankle. Proximal tibiofibular joint dislocation is a rare injury and accounts for less than 1% of all knee injuries. This dislocation has been reported in patients who had been engaged in football, ballet dancing, equestrian jumping, parachuting and snowboarding.

Case presentation: A 20-year-old man was injured whilst playing football. He felt a pop in the right knee and was subsequently unable to bear weight on it. The range of movement in his knee joint was limited. Anterior-posterior and lateral X-rays of the knee revealed anterolateral dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint. Comparison views confirmed the anterolateral dislocation. He had a failed manipulation under anaesthesia and the joint needed an open reduction in which the fibular head was levered back into place. Operative findings revealed a horizontal type of joint.

Conclusion: An exceedingly rare dislocation of a horizontal type of proximal tibiofibular joint was presented following a football injury. This dislocation was irreducible by a closed method.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus