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Tools for developing, implementing, and evaluating state policy.

Ford Lattimore B, O'Neil S, Besculides M - Prev Chronic Dis (2008)

Bottom Line: In contrast to interventions focused on individual people, policies have the potential to affect health across populations.Because of the critical role of policy in these activities, CDC provides guidance in developing, implementing, and evaluating policy.We also highlight lessons learned in developing these tools and ways that states can use the tools in their policy and program planning.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, MS K-47, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. blford@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
Policy can improve health by initiating changes in physical, economic, and social environments. In contrast to interventions focused on individual people, policies have the potential to affect health across populations. For this reason, the Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises states funded under the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program to engage in activities supporting the development and maintenance of policies that can help reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease. Currently, the Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention funds programs in 33 states and the District of Columbia to promote cardiovascular health. One goal of these programs is to build states' capacity to develop, implement, track, and sustain population-based interventions that address heart disease and stroke. Because of the critical role of policy in these activities, CDC provides guidance in developing, implementing, and evaluating policy. In 2004, the division contracted with Mathematica Policy Research, Inc, to conduct the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Policy Project, which included development of an online database of state heart disease and stroke prevention policies and a mapping application to show which states have these policies. We discuss the method for developing the database, mapping application, and other tools to assist states in developing, implementing, and evaluating heart disease and stroke prevention policies. We also highlight lessons learned in developing these tools and ways that states can use the tools in their policy and program planning.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Home page of the mapping application for the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Policy Project, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United States.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Home page of the mapping application for the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Policy Project, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United States.

Mentions: The mapping application allows users to see the distribution of enacted or current HDSP policies across the United States (Figure 1). To begin the process, CDC teamed with experts in geographic information systems from Northrop Grumman Corporation, including a usability engineer who pilot tested the application. Users can view legislation by CDC priority area or by topic. For example, if the user selects heart disease as the search topic, a color-coded map of the United States appears (Figure 2) showing which states have enacted laws, current laws, both enacted and current laws, or no legislation related to heart disease. The user can then click on a state and view information about the legislation, including the year it was introduced, its status, a summary of the policy, and a link to the legislation in its entirety (Figure 3).


Tools for developing, implementing, and evaluating state policy.

Ford Lattimore B, O'Neil S, Besculides M - Prev Chronic Dis (2008)

Home page of the mapping application for the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Policy Project, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United States.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2396984&req=5

Figure 1: Home page of the mapping application for the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Policy Project, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United States.
Mentions: The mapping application allows users to see the distribution of enacted or current HDSP policies across the United States (Figure 1). To begin the process, CDC teamed with experts in geographic information systems from Northrop Grumman Corporation, including a usability engineer who pilot tested the application. Users can view legislation by CDC priority area or by topic. For example, if the user selects heart disease as the search topic, a color-coded map of the United States appears (Figure 2) showing which states have enacted laws, current laws, both enacted and current laws, or no legislation related to heart disease. The user can then click on a state and view information about the legislation, including the year it was introduced, its status, a summary of the policy, and a link to the legislation in its entirety (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: In contrast to interventions focused on individual people, policies have the potential to affect health across populations.Because of the critical role of policy in these activities, CDC provides guidance in developing, implementing, and evaluating policy.We also highlight lessons learned in developing these tools and ways that states can use the tools in their policy and program planning.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, MS K-47, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. blford@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
Policy can improve health by initiating changes in physical, economic, and social environments. In contrast to interventions focused on individual people, policies have the potential to affect health across populations. For this reason, the Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises states funded under the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program to engage in activities supporting the development and maintenance of policies that can help reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease. Currently, the Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention funds programs in 33 states and the District of Columbia to promote cardiovascular health. One goal of these programs is to build states' capacity to develop, implement, track, and sustain population-based interventions that address heart disease and stroke. Because of the critical role of policy in these activities, CDC provides guidance in developing, implementing, and evaluating policy. In 2004, the division contracted with Mathematica Policy Research, Inc, to conduct the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Policy Project, which included development of an online database of state heart disease and stroke prevention policies and a mapping application to show which states have these policies. We discuss the method for developing the database, mapping application, and other tools to assist states in developing, implementing, and evaluating heart disease and stroke prevention policies. We also highlight lessons learned in developing these tools and ways that states can use the tools in their policy and program planning.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus