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Mail-in data collection at SPring-8 protein crystallography beamlines.

Okazaki N, Hasegawa K, Ueno G, Murakami H, Kumasaka T, Yamamoto M - J Synchrotron Radiat (2008)

Bottom Line: For distant users there is a newly developed data management system, D-Cha.D-Cha provides a graphical user interface that enables the user to specify the experimental conditions for samples and to check and download the diffraction images using a web browser.This system is now in routine operation and is contributing to high-throughput beamline operation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198, Japan. okazaki@spring8.or.jp

ABSTRACT
A mail-in data collection system makes it possible for beamline users to collect diffraction data without visiting a synchrotron facility. In the mail-in data collection system at SPring-8, users pack crystals into sample trays and send the trays to SPring-8 via a courier service as the first step. Next, the user specifies measurement conditions and checks the diffraction images via the Internet. The user can also collect diffraction data using an automated sample changer robot and beamline control software. For distant users there is a newly developed data management system, D-Cha. D-Cha provides a graphical user interface that enables the user to specify the experimental conditions for samples and to check and download the diffraction images using a web browser. This system is now in routine operation and is contributing to high-throughput beamline operation.

Show MeSH
Typical scheme of our mail-in data collection. Red and blue boxes show operations performed by users and beamline operators, respectively. Procedures in the yellow box are repeated for each sample.
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fig2: Typical scheme of our mail-in data collection. Red and blue boxes show operations performed by users and beamline operators, respectively. Procedures in the yellow box are repeated for each sample.

Mentions: A typical experimental protocol is shown in Fig. 2 ▶. At the first stage of mail-in data collection the remote users store samples in trays designed for SPACE. This operation is performed using an offline type SPACE, which is dedicated to packing the sample. The offline SPACE stores the samples to the sample tray. Another way of sample preparation is to use a compact toolkit designed for mounting crystals by hand (Fig. 3 ▶). After the trays are prepared, the user sends the samples to SPring-8 and enters the measurement schedule from their laboratory using D-Cha. The beamline operators load the sample trays sent by the users into SPACE and perform the centering of each crystal. The centering position is stored in the sample information database and can be retrieved by SPACE and BSS. In evaluation mode (mode-1), 10 min are required for each sample on average, therefore the evaluation of 50 samples can be completed in about 8 h of beamline operators’ working time. At this time, the user can browse the measurement results (diffraction images and XAFS spectra) at their remote laboratory using the D-Cha web interface. When evaluation mode is completed, the data collection mode (mode-2) is conducted automatically overnight without an operator. The merit of this scheme is that human manipulation and inspection are completed during the daytime.


Mail-in data collection at SPring-8 protein crystallography beamlines.

Okazaki N, Hasegawa K, Ueno G, Murakami H, Kumasaka T, Yamamoto M - J Synchrotron Radiat (2008)

Typical scheme of our mail-in data collection. Red and blue boxes show operations performed by users and beamline operators, respectively. Procedures in the yellow box are repeated for each sample.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2394786&req=5

fig2: Typical scheme of our mail-in data collection. Red and blue boxes show operations performed by users and beamline operators, respectively. Procedures in the yellow box are repeated for each sample.
Mentions: A typical experimental protocol is shown in Fig. 2 ▶. At the first stage of mail-in data collection the remote users store samples in trays designed for SPACE. This operation is performed using an offline type SPACE, which is dedicated to packing the sample. The offline SPACE stores the samples to the sample tray. Another way of sample preparation is to use a compact toolkit designed for mounting crystals by hand (Fig. 3 ▶). After the trays are prepared, the user sends the samples to SPring-8 and enters the measurement schedule from their laboratory using D-Cha. The beamline operators load the sample trays sent by the users into SPACE and perform the centering of each crystal. The centering position is stored in the sample information database and can be retrieved by SPACE and BSS. In evaluation mode (mode-1), 10 min are required for each sample on average, therefore the evaluation of 50 samples can be completed in about 8 h of beamline operators’ working time. At this time, the user can browse the measurement results (diffraction images and XAFS spectra) at their remote laboratory using the D-Cha web interface. When evaluation mode is completed, the data collection mode (mode-2) is conducted automatically overnight without an operator. The merit of this scheme is that human manipulation and inspection are completed during the daytime.

Bottom Line: For distant users there is a newly developed data management system, D-Cha.D-Cha provides a graphical user interface that enables the user to specify the experimental conditions for samples and to check and download the diffraction images using a web browser.This system is now in routine operation and is contributing to high-throughput beamline operation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198, Japan. okazaki@spring8.or.jp

ABSTRACT
A mail-in data collection system makes it possible for beamline users to collect diffraction data without visiting a synchrotron facility. In the mail-in data collection system at SPring-8, users pack crystals into sample trays and send the trays to SPring-8 via a courier service as the first step. Next, the user specifies measurement conditions and checks the diffraction images via the Internet. The user can also collect diffraction data using an automated sample changer robot and beamline control software. For distant users there is a newly developed data management system, D-Cha. D-Cha provides a graphical user interface that enables the user to specify the experimental conditions for samples and to check and download the diffraction images using a web browser. This system is now in routine operation and is contributing to high-throughput beamline operation.

Show MeSH