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Highly bright X-ray generator using heat of fusion with a specially designed rotating anticathode.

Sakabe N, Ohsawa S, Sugimura T, Ikeda M, Tawada M, Watanabe N, Sasaki K, Ohshima K, Wakatsuki M, Sakabe K - J Synchrotron Radiat (2008)

Bottom Line: When the irradiated part is melted, a large amount of energy is stored as the heat of fusion, resulting in emission of X-rays 4.3 times more brilliant than can be attained by a conventional rotating anticathode.Oscillating translation of the irradiated position on the inner surface during use is expected to be very advantageous for extending the target life.A carbon film coating on the inner surface is considered to suppress evaporation of the target metal and will be an important technique in further realization of highly bright X-ray generation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: PF, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801, Japan. nsakabe@sbsp.jp

ABSTRACT
A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator has been developed, in which the electron beam irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped anticathode (Cu). A high-flux electron beam is focused on the inner surface by optimizing the shape of the bending magnet. The power of the electron beam can be increased to the point at which the irradiated part of the inner surface is melted, because a strong centrifugal force fixes the melted part on the inner surface. When the irradiated part is melted, a large amount of energy is stored as the heat of fusion, resulting in emission of X-rays 4.3 times more brilliant than can be attained by a conventional rotating anticathode. Oscillating translation of the irradiated position on the inner surface during use is expected to be very advantageous for extending the target life. A carbon film coating on the inner surface is considered to suppress evaporation of the target metal and will be an important technique in further realization of highly bright X-ray generation.

No MeSH data available.


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Schematic drawing of the measurement environment used to observe the X-ray beam size with a pinhole technique and the temperature around the irradiation point.
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fig2: Schematic drawing of the measurement environment used to observe the X-ray beam size with a pinhole technique and the temperature around the irradiation point.

Mentions: The new type of X-ray generator shown in Figs. 1 ▶ and 2 ▶ is obtained by modifying a conventional rotating-anticathode X-ray generator whose maximum power is 60 kV × 100 mA. These parameters are listed in Table 1 ▶. The newly designed parts are an electron gun and a U-shaped rotating anticathode. Since the experimental details of the gun have been published by Sugimura et al. (2007a ▶,b), the U-shaped rotating anticathode will be mainly described in the present paper. The X-ray takeout angle was 6°. Fig. 3 ▶ shows the modified main part of the X-ray generator for this experiment. The bending magnet (BM) was set outside of the cover of the vacuum chamber, as shown in Figs. 2 ▶ ▶–4 ▶. Thus a large area of the center of the cover is occupied by the bending magnet. The cover also has a window for a thermometer to observe the temperature, a Be window with a shutter and an Au pinhole for observing the X-rays, a movable beam catcher and two turns of a cooling pipe at the outer edge of the cover. The nearest gap between the target and the cover is only 1 mm, to achieve the small focus size of the electron beam on the target surface by the bending magnet. An electron beam travelling from the electron gun through a pipe, as shown in Fig. 5 ▶, is bent and focused by the bending magnet (see Fig. 4 ▶) and irradiates the U-shaped anticathode (Fig. 5 ▶).


Highly bright X-ray generator using heat of fusion with a specially designed rotating anticathode.

Sakabe N, Ohsawa S, Sugimura T, Ikeda M, Tawada M, Watanabe N, Sasaki K, Ohshima K, Wakatsuki M, Sakabe K - J Synchrotron Radiat (2008)

Schematic drawing of the measurement environment used to observe the X-ray beam size with a pinhole technique and the temperature around the irradiation point.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2394780&req=5

fig2: Schematic drawing of the measurement environment used to observe the X-ray beam size with a pinhole technique and the temperature around the irradiation point.
Mentions: The new type of X-ray generator shown in Figs. 1 ▶ and 2 ▶ is obtained by modifying a conventional rotating-anticathode X-ray generator whose maximum power is 60 kV × 100 mA. These parameters are listed in Table 1 ▶. The newly designed parts are an electron gun and a U-shaped rotating anticathode. Since the experimental details of the gun have been published by Sugimura et al. (2007a ▶,b), the U-shaped rotating anticathode will be mainly described in the present paper. The X-ray takeout angle was 6°. Fig. 3 ▶ shows the modified main part of the X-ray generator for this experiment. The bending magnet (BM) was set outside of the cover of the vacuum chamber, as shown in Figs. 2 ▶ ▶–4 ▶. Thus a large area of the center of the cover is occupied by the bending magnet. The cover also has a window for a thermometer to observe the temperature, a Be window with a shutter and an Au pinhole for observing the X-rays, a movable beam catcher and two turns of a cooling pipe at the outer edge of the cover. The nearest gap between the target and the cover is only 1 mm, to achieve the small focus size of the electron beam on the target surface by the bending magnet. An electron beam travelling from the electron gun through a pipe, as shown in Fig. 5 ▶, is bent and focused by the bending magnet (see Fig. 4 ▶) and irradiates the U-shaped anticathode (Fig. 5 ▶).

Bottom Line: When the irradiated part is melted, a large amount of energy is stored as the heat of fusion, resulting in emission of X-rays 4.3 times more brilliant than can be attained by a conventional rotating anticathode.Oscillating translation of the irradiated position on the inner surface during use is expected to be very advantageous for extending the target life.A carbon film coating on the inner surface is considered to suppress evaporation of the target metal and will be an important technique in further realization of highly bright X-ray generation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: PF, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801, Japan. nsakabe@sbsp.jp

ABSTRACT
A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator has been developed, in which the electron beam irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped anticathode (Cu). A high-flux electron beam is focused on the inner surface by optimizing the shape of the bending magnet. The power of the electron beam can be increased to the point at which the irradiated part of the inner surface is melted, because a strong centrifugal force fixes the melted part on the inner surface. When the irradiated part is melted, a large amount of energy is stored as the heat of fusion, resulting in emission of X-rays 4.3 times more brilliant than can be attained by a conventional rotating anticathode. Oscillating translation of the irradiated position on the inner surface during use is expected to be very advantageous for extending the target life. A carbon film coating on the inner surface is considered to suppress evaporation of the target metal and will be an important technique in further realization of highly bright X-ray generation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus