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From antenna to antenna: lateral shift of olfactory memory recall by honeybees.

Rogers LJ, Vallortigara G - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bottom Line: Long-term memory one day after training is also accessed mainly via the left antenna.Hence, not only are the cellular events of memory formation similar in bees and vertebrate species but also the lateralized networks involved may be similar.These findings therefore seem to call for remarkable parallel evolution and suggest that the proper functioning of memory formation in a bilateral animal, either vertebrate or invertebrate, requires lateralization of processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, Australia. lrogers@une.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Honeybees, Apis mellifera, readily learn to associate odours with sugar rewards and we show here that recall of the olfactory memory, as demonstrated by the bee extending its proboscis when presented with the trained odour, involves first the right and then the left antenna. At 1-2 hour after training using both antennae, recall is possible mainly when the bee uses its right antenna but by 6 hours after training a lateral shift has occurred and the memory can now be recalled mainly when the left antenna is in use. Long-term memory one day after training is also accessed mainly via the left antenna. This time-dependent shift from right to left antenna is also seen as side biases in responding to odour presented to the bee's left or right side. Hence, not only are the cellular events of memory formation similar in bees and vertebrate species but also the lateralized networks involved may be similar. These findings therefore seem to call for remarkable parallel evolution and suggest that the proper functioning of memory formation in a bilateral animal, either vertebrate or invertebrate, requires lateralization of processing.

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The mean number of A responses, plotted with standard error bars, in recall tested at various intervals after training is shown for presentations of the odours on the bee's left side (open circles) or right side (closed circles).
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pone-0002340-g003: The mean number of A responses, plotted with standard error bars, in recall tested at various intervals after training is shown for presentations of the odours on the bee's left side (open circles) or right side (closed circles).

Mentions: The data for number of A responses (extension to lemon and not to vanilla) were analysed by GLM with side as a repeated measure and time as a factor. There was a significant main effect of side (F1,25 = 10.452, p = 0.003) and a significant interaction between side and time of testing (F3,25 = 13.709, p = 0.0001); Figure 3. Post hoc paired t-tests between the left and right sides showed that there were significantly more A responses on the right than on the left side at 1 hour after training (1-tailed, paired t-test, p = 0.045), replicating the results of experiment 1 using the different method of testing. No significant left/right difference in A scores occurred at 3 hours after training (p = 0.768) and this was due to the number of A responses being high on both sides of presentation. At both 6 and 23 hours after training the left/right difference was significant (p = 0.016 and p = 0.0001, respectively, 2-tailed paired t-tests) and at these times the A responses were higher on the left side than on the right side. The non-A responses were almost entirely D responses (i.e. no PER for either lemon or vanilla).


From antenna to antenna: lateral shift of olfactory memory recall by honeybees.

Rogers LJ, Vallortigara G - PLoS ONE (2008)

The mean number of A responses, plotted with standard error bars, in recall tested at various intervals after training is shown for presentations of the odours on the bee's left side (open circles) or right side (closed circles).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2394662&req=5

pone-0002340-g003: The mean number of A responses, plotted with standard error bars, in recall tested at various intervals after training is shown for presentations of the odours on the bee's left side (open circles) or right side (closed circles).
Mentions: The data for number of A responses (extension to lemon and not to vanilla) were analysed by GLM with side as a repeated measure and time as a factor. There was a significant main effect of side (F1,25 = 10.452, p = 0.003) and a significant interaction between side and time of testing (F3,25 = 13.709, p = 0.0001); Figure 3. Post hoc paired t-tests between the left and right sides showed that there were significantly more A responses on the right than on the left side at 1 hour after training (1-tailed, paired t-test, p = 0.045), replicating the results of experiment 1 using the different method of testing. No significant left/right difference in A scores occurred at 3 hours after training (p = 0.768) and this was due to the number of A responses being high on both sides of presentation. At both 6 and 23 hours after training the left/right difference was significant (p = 0.016 and p = 0.0001, respectively, 2-tailed paired t-tests) and at these times the A responses were higher on the left side than on the right side. The non-A responses were almost entirely D responses (i.e. no PER for either lemon or vanilla).

Bottom Line: Long-term memory one day after training is also accessed mainly via the left antenna.Hence, not only are the cellular events of memory formation similar in bees and vertebrate species but also the lateralized networks involved may be similar.These findings therefore seem to call for remarkable parallel evolution and suggest that the proper functioning of memory formation in a bilateral animal, either vertebrate or invertebrate, requires lateralization of processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, Australia. lrogers@une.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Honeybees, Apis mellifera, readily learn to associate odours with sugar rewards and we show here that recall of the olfactory memory, as demonstrated by the bee extending its proboscis when presented with the trained odour, involves first the right and then the left antenna. At 1-2 hour after training using both antennae, recall is possible mainly when the bee uses its right antenna but by 6 hours after training a lateral shift has occurred and the memory can now be recalled mainly when the left antenna is in use. Long-term memory one day after training is also accessed mainly via the left antenna. This time-dependent shift from right to left antenna is also seen as side biases in responding to odour presented to the bee's left or right side. Hence, not only are the cellular events of memory formation similar in bees and vertebrate species but also the lateralized networks involved may be similar. These findings therefore seem to call for remarkable parallel evolution and suggest that the proper functioning of memory formation in a bilateral animal, either vertebrate or invertebrate, requires lateralization of processing.

Show MeSH