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Tissue and plasma expression of the angiogenic peptide adrenomedullin in breast cancer.

Oehler MK, Fischer DC, Orlowska-Volk M, Herrle F, Kieback DG, Rees MC, Bicknell R - Br. J. Cancer (2003)

Bottom Line: ADM-peptide expression in breast tumours was significantly correlated with axillary lymph node metastasis (P=0.030).However, a significant positive correlation was found between tumour size and plasma ADM levels (r=0.641, P=0.017).In conclusion, we have shown for the first time that ADM peptide is widely expressed in breast cancer and that the degree of expression is associated with lymph node metastasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Angiogenesis Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Adrenomedullin (ADM) is an angiogenic factor that has also been shown to be a mitogen and a hypoxia survival factor for tumour cells. These properties point to ADM as a potential promoter of human malignancies, but little data are available concerning the expression of ADM in human breast cancer. In the present work, we have examined ADM peptide expression in a series of malignant breast tumours by immunohistochemistry using a newly developed anti-ADM monoclonal antibody. In addition, ADM plasma concentrations in breast cancer patients and healthy controls were determined by radioimmunoassay. Of the examined breast cancer samples, 27/33 (82%) showed a moderate to strong staining intensity. ADM-peptide expression in breast tumours was significantly correlated with axillary lymph node metastasis (P=0.030). Analysis of ADM plasma concentrations showed no significant difference between the circulating ADM levels of breast cancer patients and healthy controls. However, a significant positive correlation was found between tumour size and plasma ADM levels (r=0.641, P=0.017). Moreover, ADM levels in breast cancer patients correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis (P=0.002). In conclusion, we have shown for the first time that ADM peptide is widely expressed in breast cancer and that the degree of expression is associated with lymph node metastasis. ADM peptide in plasma of breast cancer patients reflects the size of the primary tumour, but is unlikely to be a useful tumour marker for the detection of breast cancer. Plasma ADM might represent an independent predictor of lymph node metastasis. The clinical implications of these findings remain to be evaluated.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Plasma ADM concentrations of healthy controls vs breast cancer patients with T1 or ⩾ T2 tumours.
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fig4: Plasma ADM concentrations of healthy controls vs breast cancer patients with T1 or ⩾ T2 tumours.

Mentions: Normal controls vs T2+T3.


Tissue and plasma expression of the angiogenic peptide adrenomedullin in breast cancer.

Oehler MK, Fischer DC, Orlowska-Volk M, Herrle F, Kieback DG, Rees MC, Bicknell R - Br. J. Cancer (2003)

Plasma ADM concentrations of healthy controls vs breast cancer patients with T1 or ⩾ T2 tumours.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2394432&req=5

fig4: Plasma ADM concentrations of healthy controls vs breast cancer patients with T1 or ⩾ T2 tumours.
Mentions: Normal controls vs T2+T3.

Bottom Line: ADM-peptide expression in breast tumours was significantly correlated with axillary lymph node metastasis (P=0.030).However, a significant positive correlation was found between tumour size and plasma ADM levels (r=0.641, P=0.017).In conclusion, we have shown for the first time that ADM peptide is widely expressed in breast cancer and that the degree of expression is associated with lymph node metastasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Angiogenesis Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Adrenomedullin (ADM) is an angiogenic factor that has also been shown to be a mitogen and a hypoxia survival factor for tumour cells. These properties point to ADM as a potential promoter of human malignancies, but little data are available concerning the expression of ADM in human breast cancer. In the present work, we have examined ADM peptide expression in a series of malignant breast tumours by immunohistochemistry using a newly developed anti-ADM monoclonal antibody. In addition, ADM plasma concentrations in breast cancer patients and healthy controls were determined by radioimmunoassay. Of the examined breast cancer samples, 27/33 (82%) showed a moderate to strong staining intensity. ADM-peptide expression in breast tumours was significantly correlated with axillary lymph node metastasis (P=0.030). Analysis of ADM plasma concentrations showed no significant difference between the circulating ADM levels of breast cancer patients and healthy controls. However, a significant positive correlation was found between tumour size and plasma ADM levels (r=0.641, P=0.017). Moreover, ADM levels in breast cancer patients correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis (P=0.002). In conclusion, we have shown for the first time that ADM peptide is widely expressed in breast cancer and that the degree of expression is associated with lymph node metastasis. ADM peptide in plasma of breast cancer patients reflects the size of the primary tumour, but is unlikely to be a useful tumour marker for the detection of breast cancer. Plasma ADM might represent an independent predictor of lymph node metastasis. The clinical implications of these findings remain to be evaluated.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus