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Ethnomedicinal plant knowledge and practice of the Oromo ethnic group in southwestern Ethiopia.

Yineger H, Yewhalaw D, Teketay D - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2008)

Bottom Line: The use of more than one species was significantly cited for remedy preparations.The reported abundance of the ethnomedicinal plant species varied significantly with respect to the presence of multiple uses of the reported species.Our results showed that ethnomedicinal plant species used by healers are under serious threat due to several factors, which indicates the need for urgent attention towards their conservation and sustainable utilization.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Jimma University, P,O, Box 5195, Jimma, Ethiopia. haile_mulu@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
An ethnomedicinal study was conducted to document the indigenous medicinal plant knowledge and use by traditional healers in southwestern Ethiopia from December 2005 to November 2006. Data were collected from 45 randomly selected traditional healers using semi-structured interviews and observations. Sixty-seven ethnomedicinal plant species used by traditional healers to manage 51 different human ailments were identified and documented. Healers' indigenous knowledge was positively correlated with their reported age but not with their educational level. High degree of consensus was observed among traditional healers in treating tumor (locally known as Tanacha), rabies (Dhukuba Seree) and insect bite (Hadhaa). The use of more than one species was significantly cited for remedy preparations. The reported abundance of the ethnomedicinal plant species varied significantly with respect to the presence of multiple uses of the reported species. Our results showed that ethnomedicinal plant species used by healers are under serious threat due to several factors, which indicates the need for urgent attention towards their conservation and sustainable utilization.

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Administration routes of traditional medicine.
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Figure 4: Administration routes of traditional medicine.

Mentions: The administration of remedial preparations were mainly oral (42 species, 44%) and on top of the body (32 species, 34%) (Figure 4). According to healers, preparations were prescribed to patients differently for different age groups. The dosage prescription for children was mostly lower than for adults. Dosages were estimated using lids, spoons, cups, glasses, pinches or handfuls. The amounts of remedy and prescription rates were generally dependent on the degree and duration of the ailment. Treatment durations varied between 1 and 7 days.


Ethnomedicinal plant knowledge and practice of the Oromo ethnic group in southwestern Ethiopia.

Yineger H, Yewhalaw D, Teketay D - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2008)

Administration routes of traditional medicine.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2390512&req=5

Figure 4: Administration routes of traditional medicine.
Mentions: The administration of remedial preparations were mainly oral (42 species, 44%) and on top of the body (32 species, 34%) (Figure 4). According to healers, preparations were prescribed to patients differently for different age groups. The dosage prescription for children was mostly lower than for adults. Dosages were estimated using lids, spoons, cups, glasses, pinches or handfuls. The amounts of remedy and prescription rates were generally dependent on the degree and duration of the ailment. Treatment durations varied between 1 and 7 days.

Bottom Line: The use of more than one species was significantly cited for remedy preparations.The reported abundance of the ethnomedicinal plant species varied significantly with respect to the presence of multiple uses of the reported species.Our results showed that ethnomedicinal plant species used by healers are under serious threat due to several factors, which indicates the need for urgent attention towards their conservation and sustainable utilization.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Jimma University, P,O, Box 5195, Jimma, Ethiopia. haile_mulu@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
An ethnomedicinal study was conducted to document the indigenous medicinal plant knowledge and use by traditional healers in southwestern Ethiopia from December 2005 to November 2006. Data were collected from 45 randomly selected traditional healers using semi-structured interviews and observations. Sixty-seven ethnomedicinal plant species used by traditional healers to manage 51 different human ailments were identified and documented. Healers' indigenous knowledge was positively correlated with their reported age but not with their educational level. High degree of consensus was observed among traditional healers in treating tumor (locally known as Tanacha), rabies (Dhukuba Seree) and insect bite (Hadhaa). The use of more than one species was significantly cited for remedy preparations. The reported abundance of the ethnomedicinal plant species varied significantly with respect to the presence of multiple uses of the reported species. Our results showed that ethnomedicinal plant species used by healers are under serious threat due to several factors, which indicates the need for urgent attention towards their conservation and sustainable utilization.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus