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Ethnomedicinal plant knowledge and practice of the Oromo ethnic group in southwestern Ethiopia.

Yineger H, Yewhalaw D, Teketay D - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2008)

Bottom Line: The use of more than one species was significantly cited for remedy preparations.The reported abundance of the ethnomedicinal plant species varied significantly with respect to the presence of multiple uses of the reported species.Our results showed that ethnomedicinal plant species used by healers are under serious threat due to several factors, which indicates the need for urgent attention towards their conservation and sustainable utilization.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Jimma University, P,O, Box 5195, Jimma, Ethiopia. haile_mulu@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
An ethnomedicinal study was conducted to document the indigenous medicinal plant knowledge and use by traditional healers in southwestern Ethiopia from December 2005 to November 2006. Data were collected from 45 randomly selected traditional healers using semi-structured interviews and observations. Sixty-seven ethnomedicinal plant species used by traditional healers to manage 51 different human ailments were identified and documented. Healers' indigenous knowledge was positively correlated with their reported age but not with their educational level. High degree of consensus was observed among traditional healers in treating tumor (locally known as Tanacha), rabies (Dhukuba Seree) and insect bite (Hadhaa). The use of more than one species was significantly cited for remedy preparations. The reported abundance of the ethnomedicinal plant species varied significantly with respect to the presence of multiple uses of the reported species. Our results showed that ethnomedicinal plant species used by healers are under serious threat due to several factors, which indicates the need for urgent attention towards their conservation and sustainable utilization.

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Location of the study Kebeles in the three selected districts of Jimma Zone, Ethiopia.
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Figure 1: Location of the study Kebeles in the three selected districts of Jimma Zone, Ethiopia.

Mentions: The study was carried out in nine Kebeles (the smallest administrative units in Ethiopia) belonging to three districts (Omo Nada, Kersa and Tiro Afeta) around Gilgel Gibe Hydropower Reservoir, Jimma Zone, southwestern Ethiopia. Jimma Zone is one of the administrative zones in Oromia Region of Ethiopia. It is one of the major coffee growing areas of the country contributing much to the economy of the nation. The population of Omo Nada, Kersa and Tiro Afeta is 254417, 329629 and 130554, respectively [7]. The study Kebeles under the aforementioned districts were Siba, Degoso, Asandabo, Burqaa, Waqtolaa, Gudeta Bula, Qajaloo, Ayino and Dacha Nadhii (Figure 1). The study area is located at about 265 km southwest of the capital Addis Ababa and 65 km Northeast of Jimma town at 07°42'37" – 07°53'50" N and 037°11'22" – 037°20'36" E. It has an altitudinal range of 1675 to 2094 m, a mean annual temperature of 19.2°C and receives an annual rainfall ranging from 1200 – 2800 mm. Evergreen montane thickets and shrubs are typical vegetation types of the area. Cultivating crops (maize, teff, sorghum, barley, pulses and false banana) and rearing of livestock are the major socioeconomic activities of the local people.


Ethnomedicinal plant knowledge and practice of the Oromo ethnic group in southwestern Ethiopia.

Yineger H, Yewhalaw D, Teketay D - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2008)

Location of the study Kebeles in the three selected districts of Jimma Zone, Ethiopia.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2390512&req=5

Figure 1: Location of the study Kebeles in the three selected districts of Jimma Zone, Ethiopia.
Mentions: The study was carried out in nine Kebeles (the smallest administrative units in Ethiopia) belonging to three districts (Omo Nada, Kersa and Tiro Afeta) around Gilgel Gibe Hydropower Reservoir, Jimma Zone, southwestern Ethiopia. Jimma Zone is one of the administrative zones in Oromia Region of Ethiopia. It is one of the major coffee growing areas of the country contributing much to the economy of the nation. The population of Omo Nada, Kersa and Tiro Afeta is 254417, 329629 and 130554, respectively [7]. The study Kebeles under the aforementioned districts were Siba, Degoso, Asandabo, Burqaa, Waqtolaa, Gudeta Bula, Qajaloo, Ayino and Dacha Nadhii (Figure 1). The study area is located at about 265 km southwest of the capital Addis Ababa and 65 km Northeast of Jimma town at 07°42'37" – 07°53'50" N and 037°11'22" – 037°20'36" E. It has an altitudinal range of 1675 to 2094 m, a mean annual temperature of 19.2°C and receives an annual rainfall ranging from 1200 – 2800 mm. Evergreen montane thickets and shrubs are typical vegetation types of the area. Cultivating crops (maize, teff, sorghum, barley, pulses and false banana) and rearing of livestock are the major socioeconomic activities of the local people.

Bottom Line: The use of more than one species was significantly cited for remedy preparations.The reported abundance of the ethnomedicinal plant species varied significantly with respect to the presence of multiple uses of the reported species.Our results showed that ethnomedicinal plant species used by healers are under serious threat due to several factors, which indicates the need for urgent attention towards their conservation and sustainable utilization.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Jimma University, P,O, Box 5195, Jimma, Ethiopia. haile_mulu@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
An ethnomedicinal study was conducted to document the indigenous medicinal plant knowledge and use by traditional healers in southwestern Ethiopia from December 2005 to November 2006. Data were collected from 45 randomly selected traditional healers using semi-structured interviews and observations. Sixty-seven ethnomedicinal plant species used by traditional healers to manage 51 different human ailments were identified and documented. Healers' indigenous knowledge was positively correlated with their reported age but not with their educational level. High degree of consensus was observed among traditional healers in treating tumor (locally known as Tanacha), rabies (Dhukuba Seree) and insect bite (Hadhaa). The use of more than one species was significantly cited for remedy preparations. The reported abundance of the ethnomedicinal plant species varied significantly with respect to the presence of multiple uses of the reported species. Our results showed that ethnomedicinal plant species used by healers are under serious threat due to several factors, which indicates the need for urgent attention towards their conservation and sustainable utilization.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus