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Comparative analysis of septic injury-inducible genes in phylogenetically distant model organisms of regeneration and stem cell research, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and the cnidarian Hydra vulgaris.

Altincicek B, Vilcinskas A - Front. Zool. (2008)

Bottom Line: Under natural conditions wounding may result from predator attacks.Identified genes from both animals encode proteins that share sequence similarities with potential homologues from other organisms known to be involved in signaling (e.g. calreticulin in Schmidtea and major vault protein in Hydra), stress responses (e.g. Hsp20 in Schmidtea and a PRP19/PSO4 DNA repair protein in Hydra), or to represent potential antimicrobial effectors (e.g. perforin-like protein in Schmidtea and PR-1-like protein and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 in Hydra).As expected, septic wounding also induces expression of genes in Schmidtea and Hydra potentially involved in tissue remodeling associated with regeneration processes (e.g. matrix metalloproteinase in Schmidtea and a potential von Willebrand factor in Hydra).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Interdisciplinary Research Center, Institute of Phytopathology and Applied Zoology, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26-32, D-35392 Giessen, Germany. Boran.Altincicek@agrar.uni-giessen.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: The planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and the cnidarian Hydra vulgaris have emerged as valuable model organisms in regeneration and stem cell research because of their prominent ability to regenerate a complete organism from any small body fragment. Under natural conditions wounding may result from predator attacks. These injuries open their innermost to a wide array of microbes present in the environment. Therefore, we established the hypothesis that regeneration processes may be linked to or at least accompanied by innate immune responses. In order to screen for septic wounding inducible genes we dissected individuals using a scalpel in the presence of a crude bacterial lipopolysaccharide preparation that is commonly used to elicit innate immune responses in animals and applied the suppression subtractive hybridization technique that selectively amplifies cDNAs of differentially expressed genes.

Results: This analysis revealed the induced expression of 27 genes in immune challenged Schmidtea and 35 genes in immune challenged Hydra. Identified genes from both animals encode proteins that share sequence similarities with potential homologues from other organisms known to be involved in signaling (e.g. calreticulin in Schmidtea and major vault protein in Hydra), stress responses (e.g. Hsp20 in Schmidtea and a PRP19/PSO4 DNA repair protein in Hydra), or to represent potential antimicrobial effectors (e.g. perforin-like protein in Schmidtea and PR-1-like protein and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 in Hydra). As expected, septic wounding also induces expression of genes in Schmidtea and Hydra potentially involved in tissue remodeling associated with regeneration processes (e.g. matrix metalloproteinase in Schmidtea and a potential von Willebrand factor in Hydra).

Conclusion: We identified numerous immune-inducible genes in Hydra and Schmidtea that show a similar distribution corresponding to their physiological roles, although lineages of both animals split from their common ancestor for more than five hundred millions of years. The present study is the first analysis of immune-inducible genes of these two phylogenetically distant model organisms of regeneration and provide numerous candidate genes that we can use as a starting point for comparative examination of interrelationships between immunity and homeostasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of immune-inducible transcripts identified by the SSH approach in Schmidtea and Hydra. Septic injury results in an immune-induced expression of totally 27 genes in S. mediterranea (A) and 35 genes in H. vulgaris (B) as obtained by the SSH approach. Interestingly, the genes have a similar distribution regarding their physiological roles.
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Figure 2: Distribution of immune-inducible transcripts identified by the SSH approach in Schmidtea and Hydra. Septic injury results in an immune-induced expression of totally 27 genes in S. mediterranea (A) and 35 genes in H. vulgaris (B) as obtained by the SSH approach. Interestingly, the genes have a similar distribution regarding their physiological roles.

Mentions: A subtracted cDNA library enriched in immune-inducible genes from S. mediterranea and H. vulgaris, respectively, was constructed by using the SSH method. A total of each 288 clones were randomly picked and subjected to colony PCR. Plasmids of bacterial colonies that have been screened positively in blot hybridization indicating induced expression of corresponding genes were isolated and sequenced. Here, we describe the identification of 27 septic wounding-inducible genes in S. mediterranea (Table 1) and 35 septic wounding-inducible genes in H. vulgaris (Table 2) potentially involved in antimicrobial defense, signaling, and other immunity-linked cellular processes (Fig. 2).


Comparative analysis of septic injury-inducible genes in phylogenetically distant model organisms of regeneration and stem cell research, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and the cnidarian Hydra vulgaris.

Altincicek B, Vilcinskas A - Front. Zool. (2008)

Distribution of immune-inducible transcripts identified by the SSH approach in Schmidtea and Hydra. Septic injury results in an immune-induced expression of totally 27 genes in S. mediterranea (A) and 35 genes in H. vulgaris (B) as obtained by the SSH approach. Interestingly, the genes have a similar distribution regarding their physiological roles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2386466&req=5

Figure 2: Distribution of immune-inducible transcripts identified by the SSH approach in Schmidtea and Hydra. Septic injury results in an immune-induced expression of totally 27 genes in S. mediterranea (A) and 35 genes in H. vulgaris (B) as obtained by the SSH approach. Interestingly, the genes have a similar distribution regarding their physiological roles.
Mentions: A subtracted cDNA library enriched in immune-inducible genes from S. mediterranea and H. vulgaris, respectively, was constructed by using the SSH method. A total of each 288 clones were randomly picked and subjected to colony PCR. Plasmids of bacterial colonies that have been screened positively in blot hybridization indicating induced expression of corresponding genes were isolated and sequenced. Here, we describe the identification of 27 septic wounding-inducible genes in S. mediterranea (Table 1) and 35 septic wounding-inducible genes in H. vulgaris (Table 2) potentially involved in antimicrobial defense, signaling, and other immunity-linked cellular processes (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Under natural conditions wounding may result from predator attacks.Identified genes from both animals encode proteins that share sequence similarities with potential homologues from other organisms known to be involved in signaling (e.g. calreticulin in Schmidtea and major vault protein in Hydra), stress responses (e.g. Hsp20 in Schmidtea and a PRP19/PSO4 DNA repair protein in Hydra), or to represent potential antimicrobial effectors (e.g. perforin-like protein in Schmidtea and PR-1-like protein and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 in Hydra).As expected, septic wounding also induces expression of genes in Schmidtea and Hydra potentially involved in tissue remodeling associated with regeneration processes (e.g. matrix metalloproteinase in Schmidtea and a potential von Willebrand factor in Hydra).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Interdisciplinary Research Center, Institute of Phytopathology and Applied Zoology, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26-32, D-35392 Giessen, Germany. Boran.Altincicek@agrar.uni-giessen.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: The planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and the cnidarian Hydra vulgaris have emerged as valuable model organisms in regeneration and stem cell research because of their prominent ability to regenerate a complete organism from any small body fragment. Under natural conditions wounding may result from predator attacks. These injuries open their innermost to a wide array of microbes present in the environment. Therefore, we established the hypothesis that regeneration processes may be linked to or at least accompanied by innate immune responses. In order to screen for septic wounding inducible genes we dissected individuals using a scalpel in the presence of a crude bacterial lipopolysaccharide preparation that is commonly used to elicit innate immune responses in animals and applied the suppression subtractive hybridization technique that selectively amplifies cDNAs of differentially expressed genes.

Results: This analysis revealed the induced expression of 27 genes in immune challenged Schmidtea and 35 genes in immune challenged Hydra. Identified genes from both animals encode proteins that share sequence similarities with potential homologues from other organisms known to be involved in signaling (e.g. calreticulin in Schmidtea and major vault protein in Hydra), stress responses (e.g. Hsp20 in Schmidtea and a PRP19/PSO4 DNA repair protein in Hydra), or to represent potential antimicrobial effectors (e.g. perforin-like protein in Schmidtea and PR-1-like protein and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 in Hydra). As expected, septic wounding also induces expression of genes in Schmidtea and Hydra potentially involved in tissue remodeling associated with regeneration processes (e.g. matrix metalloproteinase in Schmidtea and a potential von Willebrand factor in Hydra).

Conclusion: We identified numerous immune-inducible genes in Hydra and Schmidtea that show a similar distribution corresponding to their physiological roles, although lineages of both animals split from their common ancestor for more than five hundred millions of years. The present study is the first analysis of immune-inducible genes of these two phylogenetically distant model organisms of regeneration and provide numerous candidate genes that we can use as a starting point for comparative examination of interrelationships between immunity and homeostasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus