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The classic: maggots in treatment of osteomyelitis: a simple inexpensive method. 1933.

McKeever DC - Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res. (2008)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A method is presented by which maggots may be raised for use in a hospital or private practice.

Very little time is required in culture and growth of maggots by this method.

The expense for equipment is almost negligible since most of the apparatus is home-made.

If the maggots are properly applied, any slight discomfort to the patient is easily controlled.

If proper drainage is maintained, the maggots do not die in the wound.

Secondary closure of the wounds, after the bone is covered with granulation tissue, is advisable if the wounds are extensive or in a position exposed to trauma.

Secondary closure of the wounds, after the bone is covered with granulation tissue, is advisable if the wounds are extensive or in a position exposed to trauma.

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Complete dressing on an extremity, showing screen held in place by adhesive and bandage.
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Fig5: Complete dressing on an extremity, showing screen held in place by adhesive and bandage.

Mentions: The screens are applied in much the same manner as described by Child and Roberts [8]. The surrounding skin is cleaned with ether and a layer of flamed adhesive is applied to the edge of the wound. This is coated with liquid adhesive. The maggots are then put in the wound and covered with the screen cage which is tightly taped down, leaving the screen exposed. The tape should be applied in the manner of a basket splint in order to make pressure around the wound. If the screen is large, a narrow strip of adhesive may be drawn across the top to hold it firmly in place. If on an extremity, a snug bandage should be applied to hold the tape in place (Fig. 5). A pad is so placed as to catch the drainage from the wound but not to obstruct the access of light and air to the screen. The bandage and pad may be changed as often as necessary without disturbing the remainder of the dressing. The maggots are left in the wound for five days at each application, unless there is some indication for their removal at an earlier stage. If the drainage stops, the maggots are probably dead and should be removed, although the wounds do well even when the maggots are dead. Using a support for bed covers, a light may be placed to shine on the screen. The light drives the maggots deep into the wound and adds to the comfort of the patient. It should not be placed so close as to dry the secretions on the screen as this blocks drainage and results in quick death of the maggots. Between applications of maggots, a day’s rest is given, the wound being tightly packed with dry gauze.Fig. 5


The classic: maggots in treatment of osteomyelitis: a simple inexpensive method. 1933.

McKeever DC - Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res. (2008)

Complete dressing on an extremity, showing screen held in place by adhesive and bandage.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2384033&req=5

Fig5: Complete dressing on an extremity, showing screen held in place by adhesive and bandage.
Mentions: The screens are applied in much the same manner as described by Child and Roberts [8]. The surrounding skin is cleaned with ether and a layer of flamed adhesive is applied to the edge of the wound. This is coated with liquid adhesive. The maggots are then put in the wound and covered with the screen cage which is tightly taped down, leaving the screen exposed. The tape should be applied in the manner of a basket splint in order to make pressure around the wound. If the screen is large, a narrow strip of adhesive may be drawn across the top to hold it firmly in place. If on an extremity, a snug bandage should be applied to hold the tape in place (Fig. 5). A pad is so placed as to catch the drainage from the wound but not to obstruct the access of light and air to the screen. The bandage and pad may be changed as often as necessary without disturbing the remainder of the dressing. The maggots are left in the wound for five days at each application, unless there is some indication for their removal at an earlier stage. If the drainage stops, the maggots are probably dead and should be removed, although the wounds do well even when the maggots are dead. Using a support for bed covers, a light may be placed to shine on the screen. The light drives the maggots deep into the wound and adds to the comfort of the patient. It should not be placed so close as to dry the secretions on the screen as this blocks drainage and results in quick death of the maggots. Between applications of maggots, a day’s rest is given, the wound being tightly packed with dry gauze.Fig. 5

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A method is presented by which maggots may be raised for use in a hospital or private practice.

Very little time is required in culture and growth of maggots by this method.

The expense for equipment is almost negligible since most of the apparatus is home-made.

If the maggots are properly applied, any slight discomfort to the patient is easily controlled.

If proper drainage is maintained, the maggots do not die in the wound.

Secondary closure of the wounds, after the bone is covered with granulation tissue, is advisable if the wounds are extensive or in a position exposed to trauma.

Secondary closure of the wounds, after the bone is covered with granulation tissue, is advisable if the wounds are extensive or in a position exposed to trauma.

Show MeSH