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Plasma and neutrophil fatty acid composition in advanced cancer patients and response to fish oil supplementation.

Pratt VC, Watanabe S, Bruera E, Mackey J, Clandinin MT, Baracos VE, Field CJ - Br. J. Cancer (2002)

Bottom Line: A possible imbalance or deficiency of essential fatty acids is suggested by reported beneficial effects of fish oil supplementation.Fish oil supplementation raised eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid content in plasma but not neutrophil phospholipids. 20 : 4 n-6 content was reduced in neutrophil PI following supplementation with fish oil.Change in body weight during the supplementation period related directly to increases in eicosapentaenoic acid in plasma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta, 410 Ag/Forestry Center, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2P5 Canada.

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Data points represent the change in body weight from day 1 to day 14 of fish oil supplementation and the change in plasma EPA for subjects in the fish oil group (n=9). Body weight at either days 1 or 14 was not available for the four subjects missing in the analysis. There was a significant positive relationship between change in body weight and the change in plasma EPA.
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fig2: Data points represent the change in body weight from day 1 to day 14 of fish oil supplementation and the change in plasma EPA for subjects in the fish oil group (n=9). Body weight at either days 1 or 14 was not available for the four subjects missing in the analysis. There was a significant positive relationship between change in body weight and the change in plasma EPA.

Mentions: Subjects consuming olive oil for 2 weeks did not exhibit significant changes in plasma PL fatty acid composition compared with pre-supplementation values (data not shown). Neither the fish oil nor placebo group demonstrated significant increases in plasma total PL concentrations over the 2-week supplementation period (not shown). After supplementation with fish oil, there was a significant increase in the fraction of EPA (+2–34 μg ml−1) and DHA (+2–14 μg ml−1) in plasma PL (Table 5Table 5Effects of fish oil supplementation before and after 14 days in plasma and neutrophil PL). Fish oil supplementation also resulted in a 15% reduction in 18 : 2 n-6 but did not change the 20 : 4 n-6 content of plasma (Table 5). After 14 days, the ratio of 20 : 3 n-9/20 : 4 n-6 was significantly different between fish oil and placebo groups (0.18±0.01 vs 0.27±0.04; P=0.03). The change in body weight gain during the 2 week supplementation period was directly related to the increase in EPA content in plasma PL (r=0.86; P=0.006; Figure 2Figure 2


Plasma and neutrophil fatty acid composition in advanced cancer patients and response to fish oil supplementation.

Pratt VC, Watanabe S, Bruera E, Mackey J, Clandinin MT, Baracos VE, Field CJ - Br. J. Cancer (2002)

Data points represent the change in body weight from day 1 to day 14 of fish oil supplementation and the change in plasma EPA for subjects in the fish oil group (n=9). Body weight at either days 1 or 14 was not available for the four subjects missing in the analysis. There was a significant positive relationship between change in body weight and the change in plasma EPA.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2376285&req=5

fig2: Data points represent the change in body weight from day 1 to day 14 of fish oil supplementation and the change in plasma EPA for subjects in the fish oil group (n=9). Body weight at either days 1 or 14 was not available for the four subjects missing in the analysis. There was a significant positive relationship between change in body weight and the change in plasma EPA.
Mentions: Subjects consuming olive oil for 2 weeks did not exhibit significant changes in plasma PL fatty acid composition compared with pre-supplementation values (data not shown). Neither the fish oil nor placebo group demonstrated significant increases in plasma total PL concentrations over the 2-week supplementation period (not shown). After supplementation with fish oil, there was a significant increase in the fraction of EPA (+2–34 μg ml−1) and DHA (+2–14 μg ml−1) in plasma PL (Table 5Table 5Effects of fish oil supplementation before and after 14 days in plasma and neutrophil PL). Fish oil supplementation also resulted in a 15% reduction in 18 : 2 n-6 but did not change the 20 : 4 n-6 content of plasma (Table 5). After 14 days, the ratio of 20 : 3 n-9/20 : 4 n-6 was significantly different between fish oil and placebo groups (0.18±0.01 vs 0.27±0.04; P=0.03). The change in body weight gain during the 2 week supplementation period was directly related to the increase in EPA content in plasma PL (r=0.86; P=0.006; Figure 2Figure 2

Bottom Line: A possible imbalance or deficiency of essential fatty acids is suggested by reported beneficial effects of fish oil supplementation.Fish oil supplementation raised eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid content in plasma but not neutrophil phospholipids. 20 : 4 n-6 content was reduced in neutrophil PI following supplementation with fish oil.Change in body weight during the supplementation period related directly to increases in eicosapentaenoic acid in plasma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta, 410 Ag/Forestry Center, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2P5 Canada.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus