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Molecular changes in the expression of human colonic nutrient transporters during the transition from normality to malignancy.

Lambert DW, Wood IS, Ellis A, Shirazi-Beechey SP - Br. J. Cancer (2002)

Bottom Line: Butyrate has profound effects on differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells by regulating expression of various genes associated with these processes.This was reflected in a corresponding reduction in MCT1 mRNA expression, as measured by Northern analysis.Carcinoma samples displaying reduced levels of MCT1 were found to express the high affinity glucose transporter, GLUT1, suggesting that there is a switch from butyrate to glucose as an energy source in colonic epithelia during transition to malignancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Preclinical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZJ, UK.

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Immunohistochemical detection of MCT1 in healthy human colon. Immunohistochemistry for MCT1 and villin was carried out on healthy human colon biopsy sections using a peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody as described in the Materials and Methods section. MCT1 staining is seen as a brown colouring contrasting with the blue/purple counterstained nuclei. (A) MCT1, ×200 magnification; (B) MCT1, ×400 magnification; (C) MCT1 antibody pre-incubated with immunising peptide, ×100 magnification; (D) immunodetection of villin, ×200 magnification. Bars represent 50 μm.
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fig1: Immunohistochemical detection of MCT1 in healthy human colon. Immunohistochemistry for MCT1 and villin was carried out on healthy human colon biopsy sections using a peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody as described in the Materials and Methods section. MCT1 staining is seen as a brown colouring contrasting with the blue/purple counterstained nuclei. (A) MCT1, ×200 magnification; (B) MCT1, ×400 magnification; (C) MCT1 antibody pre-incubated with immunising peptide, ×100 magnification; (D) immunodetection of villin, ×200 magnification. Bars represent 50 μm.

Mentions: We have shown previously by immunoblotting that the butyrate transporter, MCT1, is enriched 30-fold in the luminal membranes isolated from healthy human colonic tissue compared to the cellular homogenate, indicating that the protein is predominantly located on the luminal membrane of human colonocytes (Ritzhaupt et al, 1998b). Here, using immunohistochemistry, we sought to confirm and extend this observation to investigate the pattern of MCT1 expression along the crypt-surface axis. Immunohistochemical detection of MCT1 using a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody confirmed that MCT1 is predominantly located on the luminal membrane of healthy colonocytes (Figure 1AFigure 1


Molecular changes in the expression of human colonic nutrient transporters during the transition from normality to malignancy.

Lambert DW, Wood IS, Ellis A, Shirazi-Beechey SP - Br. J. Cancer (2002)

Immunohistochemical detection of MCT1 in healthy human colon. Immunohistochemistry for MCT1 and villin was carried out on healthy human colon biopsy sections using a peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody as described in the Materials and Methods section. MCT1 staining is seen as a brown colouring contrasting with the blue/purple counterstained nuclei. (A) MCT1, ×200 magnification; (B) MCT1, ×400 magnification; (C) MCT1 antibody pre-incubated with immunising peptide, ×100 magnification; (D) immunodetection of villin, ×200 magnification. Bars represent 50 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2375337&req=5

fig1: Immunohistochemical detection of MCT1 in healthy human colon. Immunohistochemistry for MCT1 and villin was carried out on healthy human colon biopsy sections using a peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody as described in the Materials and Methods section. MCT1 staining is seen as a brown colouring contrasting with the blue/purple counterstained nuclei. (A) MCT1, ×200 magnification; (B) MCT1, ×400 magnification; (C) MCT1 antibody pre-incubated with immunising peptide, ×100 magnification; (D) immunodetection of villin, ×200 magnification. Bars represent 50 μm.
Mentions: We have shown previously by immunoblotting that the butyrate transporter, MCT1, is enriched 30-fold in the luminal membranes isolated from healthy human colonic tissue compared to the cellular homogenate, indicating that the protein is predominantly located on the luminal membrane of human colonocytes (Ritzhaupt et al, 1998b). Here, using immunohistochemistry, we sought to confirm and extend this observation to investigate the pattern of MCT1 expression along the crypt-surface axis. Immunohistochemical detection of MCT1 using a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody confirmed that MCT1 is predominantly located on the luminal membrane of healthy colonocytes (Figure 1AFigure 1

Bottom Line: Butyrate has profound effects on differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells by regulating expression of various genes associated with these processes.This was reflected in a corresponding reduction in MCT1 mRNA expression, as measured by Northern analysis.Carcinoma samples displaying reduced levels of MCT1 were found to express the high affinity glucose transporter, GLUT1, suggesting that there is a switch from butyrate to glucose as an energy source in colonic epithelia during transition to malignancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Preclinical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZJ, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus