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Hydro-climate and ecological behaviour of the drought of Amazonia in 2005.

Marengo JA, Nobre CA, Tomasella J, Cardoso MF, Oyama MD - Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. (2008)

Bottom Line: In 2005, southwestern Amazonia experienced the effects of an intense drought that affected life and biodiversity.The analyses indicate that the drought was manifested as weak peak river season during autumn to winter as a consequence of a weak summertime season in southwestern Amazonia; the winter season was also accompanied by rainfall that sometimes reached 25% of the climatic value, being anomalously warm and dry and helping in the propagation of fires.Analyses of climatic and hydrological records in Amazonia suggest a broad consensus that the 2005 drought was linked not to El Niño as with most previous droughts in the Amazon, but to warming sea surface temperatures in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CPTEC/INPE, Rodovia Presidente Dutra, 12630-000 Cachoeira Paulista, São Paulo, Brazil. marengo@cptec.inpe.br

ABSTRACT
In 2005, southwestern Amazonia experienced the effects of an intense drought that affected life and biodiversity. Several major tributaries as well as parts of the main river itself contained only a fraction of their normal volumes of water, and lakes were drying up. The consequences for local people, animals and the forest itself are impossible to estimate now, but they are likely to be serious. The analyses indicate that the drought was manifested as weak peak river season during autumn to winter as a consequence of a weak summertime season in southwestern Amazonia; the winter season was also accompanied by rainfall that sometimes reached 25% of the climatic value, being anomalously warm and dry and helping in the propagation of fires. Analyses of climatic and hydrological records in Amazonia suggest a broad consensus that the 2005 drought was linked not to El Niño as with most previous droughts in the Amazon, but to warming sea surface temperatures in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean.

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Time series of the number of fire pixels detected in the Brazilian Amazonia from January 2000 to January 2006. The monthly number of fire pixels from January 2004 to January 2006 is shown as a solid black line for the north (between 6 and 7° S) and as a dashed black line for the south (between 7 and 18° S). The average number of fire pixels during 2000–2003 is shown as solid grey line for the north and as dashed grey line for the south. Fire detections are from CPTEC/INPE based on NOAA12 afternoon overpasses approximately 20 GMT.
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fig4: Time series of the number of fire pixels detected in the Brazilian Amazonia from January 2000 to January 2006. The monthly number of fire pixels from January 2004 to January 2006 is shown as a solid black line for the north (between 6 and 7° S) and as a dashed black line for the south (between 7 and 18° S). The average number of fire pixels during 2000–2003 is shown as solid grey line for the north and as dashed grey line for the south. Fire detections are from CPTEC/INPE based on NOAA12 afternoon overpasses approximately 20 GMT.

Mentions: Figure 4 shows the time series of the number of fire pixels detected with NOAA 12 in the north and the south of the Brazilian Amazonia, from January 2000 to January 2006. The monthly number of fire pixels detected during this period is represented by the solid black line for the north of the region and the dashed black line for the south. To provide a reference for these values in relation to previous years, the grey lines display the average number of fire pixels during 2000–2003 for each region and specific month. The solid grey line displays monthly values for the north and the dashed grey line for the south. As shown, fire detection in both the subregions reflects the seasonality in precipitation.


Hydro-climate and ecological behaviour of the drought of Amazonia in 2005.

Marengo JA, Nobre CA, Tomasella J, Cardoso MF, Oyama MD - Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. (2008)

Time series of the number of fire pixels detected in the Brazilian Amazonia from January 2000 to January 2006. The monthly number of fire pixels from January 2004 to January 2006 is shown as a solid black line for the north (between 6 and 7° S) and as a dashed black line for the south (between 7 and 18° S). The average number of fire pixels during 2000–2003 is shown as solid grey line for the north and as dashed grey line for the south. Fire detections are from CPTEC/INPE based on NOAA12 afternoon overpasses approximately 20 GMT.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2373880&req=5

fig4: Time series of the number of fire pixels detected in the Brazilian Amazonia from January 2000 to January 2006. The monthly number of fire pixels from January 2004 to January 2006 is shown as a solid black line for the north (between 6 and 7° S) and as a dashed black line for the south (between 7 and 18° S). The average number of fire pixels during 2000–2003 is shown as solid grey line for the north and as dashed grey line for the south. Fire detections are from CPTEC/INPE based on NOAA12 afternoon overpasses approximately 20 GMT.
Mentions: Figure 4 shows the time series of the number of fire pixels detected with NOAA 12 in the north and the south of the Brazilian Amazonia, from January 2000 to January 2006. The monthly number of fire pixels detected during this period is represented by the solid black line for the north of the region and the dashed black line for the south. To provide a reference for these values in relation to previous years, the grey lines display the average number of fire pixels during 2000–2003 for each region and specific month. The solid grey line displays monthly values for the north and the dashed grey line for the south. As shown, fire detection in both the subregions reflects the seasonality in precipitation.

Bottom Line: In 2005, southwestern Amazonia experienced the effects of an intense drought that affected life and biodiversity.The analyses indicate that the drought was manifested as weak peak river season during autumn to winter as a consequence of a weak summertime season in southwestern Amazonia; the winter season was also accompanied by rainfall that sometimes reached 25% of the climatic value, being anomalously warm and dry and helping in the propagation of fires.Analyses of climatic and hydrological records in Amazonia suggest a broad consensus that the 2005 drought was linked not to El Niño as with most previous droughts in the Amazon, but to warming sea surface temperatures in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CPTEC/INPE, Rodovia Presidente Dutra, 12630-000 Cachoeira Paulista, São Paulo, Brazil. marengo@cptec.inpe.br

ABSTRACT
In 2005, southwestern Amazonia experienced the effects of an intense drought that affected life and biodiversity. Several major tributaries as well as parts of the main river itself contained only a fraction of their normal volumes of water, and lakes were drying up. The consequences for local people, animals and the forest itself are impossible to estimate now, but they are likely to be serious. The analyses indicate that the drought was manifested as weak peak river season during autumn to winter as a consequence of a weak summertime season in southwestern Amazonia; the winter season was also accompanied by rainfall that sometimes reached 25% of the climatic value, being anomalously warm and dry and helping in the propagation of fires. Analyses of climatic and hydrological records in Amazonia suggest a broad consensus that the 2005 drought was linked not to El Niño as with most previous droughts in the Amazon, but to warming sea surface temperatures in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean.

Show MeSH