Limits...
Testing for genetic trade-offs between early- and late-life reproduction in a wild red deer population.

Nussey DH, Wilson AJ, Morris A, Pemberton J, Clutton-Brock T, Kruuk LE - Proc. Biol. Sci. (2008)

Bottom Line: Significant genetic variation for both ageing rates in a key maternal performance measure (offspring birth weight) and ELF was present in this population.We found some evidence for a negative genetic covariance between the rate of ageing in offspring birth weight and ELF, and also for a negative environmental covariance.Our results suggest rare support for the AP theory of ageing from a wild population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Large Animal Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK. dan.nussey@ed.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The antagonistic pleiotropy (AP) theory of ageing predicts genetically based trade-offs between investment in reproduction in early life and survival and performance in later life. Laboratory-based research has shown that such genetic trade-offs exist, but little is currently known about their prevalence in natural populations. We used random regression 'animal model' techniques to test the genetic basis of trade-offs between early-life fecundity (ELF) and maternal performance in late life in a wild population of red deer (Cervus elaphus) on the Isle of Rum, Scotland. Significant genetic variation for both ageing rates in a key maternal performance measure (offspring birth weight) and ELF was present in this population. We found some evidence for a negative genetic covariance between the rate of ageing in offspring birth weight and ELF, and also for a negative environmental covariance. Our results suggest rare support for the AP theory of ageing from a wild population.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The estimated change in the additive genetic variance in offspring birth weight (solid black line) and in the genetic covariance between offspring birth weight and early-life fecundity (solid grey line) with female's age. Estimated 95% CIs (dashed lines) are plotted. Additive genetic variance for early-life fecundity was 0.289 and constant with age (table 1a).
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fig3: The estimated change in the additive genetic variance in offspring birth weight (solid black line) and in the genetic covariance between offspring birth weight and early-life fecundity (solid grey line) with female's age. Estimated 95% CIs (dashed lines) are plotted. Additive genetic variance for early-life fecundity was 0.289 and constant with age (table 1a).

Mentions: The additive genetic covariance functions in table 1a were back-transformed to generate a G matrix of age-specific predictions of additive genetic variance for ELF and offspring birth weight and of covariance between the traits. Age-specific predictions of additive genetic variance in offspring birth weight increased with age (figure 3). Although variance components for ELF were by definition constant with age (the trait was measured once across an individual's lifetime), its genetic covariance with offspring birth weight could vary with age. The back-transformed G matrix revealed that the additive genetic covariance between ELF and offspring birth weight declined with age (figure 3). The estimated genetic correlation (rA) between these two traits changed from +0.40 at age 3 to −0.17 at age 15.


Testing for genetic trade-offs between early- and late-life reproduction in a wild red deer population.

Nussey DH, Wilson AJ, Morris A, Pemberton J, Clutton-Brock T, Kruuk LE - Proc. Biol. Sci. (2008)

The estimated change in the additive genetic variance in offspring birth weight (solid black line) and in the genetic covariance between offspring birth weight and early-life fecundity (solid grey line) with female's age. Estimated 95% CIs (dashed lines) are plotted. Additive genetic variance for early-life fecundity was 0.289 and constant with age (table 1a).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2366114&req=5

fig3: The estimated change in the additive genetic variance in offspring birth weight (solid black line) and in the genetic covariance between offspring birth weight and early-life fecundity (solid grey line) with female's age. Estimated 95% CIs (dashed lines) are plotted. Additive genetic variance for early-life fecundity was 0.289 and constant with age (table 1a).
Mentions: The additive genetic covariance functions in table 1a were back-transformed to generate a G matrix of age-specific predictions of additive genetic variance for ELF and offspring birth weight and of covariance between the traits. Age-specific predictions of additive genetic variance in offspring birth weight increased with age (figure 3). Although variance components for ELF were by definition constant with age (the trait was measured once across an individual's lifetime), its genetic covariance with offspring birth weight could vary with age. The back-transformed G matrix revealed that the additive genetic covariance between ELF and offspring birth weight declined with age (figure 3). The estimated genetic correlation (rA) between these two traits changed from +0.40 at age 3 to −0.17 at age 15.

Bottom Line: Significant genetic variation for both ageing rates in a key maternal performance measure (offspring birth weight) and ELF was present in this population.We found some evidence for a negative genetic covariance between the rate of ageing in offspring birth weight and ELF, and also for a negative environmental covariance.Our results suggest rare support for the AP theory of ageing from a wild population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Large Animal Research Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK. dan.nussey@ed.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The antagonistic pleiotropy (AP) theory of ageing predicts genetically based trade-offs between investment in reproduction in early life and survival and performance in later life. Laboratory-based research has shown that such genetic trade-offs exist, but little is currently known about their prevalence in natural populations. We used random regression 'animal model' techniques to test the genetic basis of trade-offs between early-life fecundity (ELF) and maternal performance in late life in a wild population of red deer (Cervus elaphus) on the Isle of Rum, Scotland. Significant genetic variation for both ageing rates in a key maternal performance measure (offspring birth weight) and ELF was present in this population. We found some evidence for a negative genetic covariance between the rate of ageing in offspring birth weight and ELF, and also for a negative environmental covariance. Our results suggest rare support for the AP theory of ageing from a wild population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus