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39th Annual European Brain and Behaviour Society Abstracts

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ABSTRACT

The EUROPEAN BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR SOCIETY has held its 39th Annual General Meeting in Trieste, in the campus next tothe Miramare castle and its park, co-hosted by SISSA, the International School for Advanced Studies, and ICTP, the Abdus SalamInternational Centre for Theoretical Physics. Alessandro Treves (SISSA) was the head and inspiration of the Local Organizingcommittee, supported by P. Battaglini, L. Chelazzi, M. Diamond and G. Vallortigara. All approaches relating brain and behaviourwere represented at the meeting, which aimed to further expand the wide spectrum of previous EBBS AGMs, and to bring togetherintegrative, system, cognitive, computational neuroscientists.

See also the societies home page: http://www.ebbs-science.org/.

No MeSH data available.


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Mentions: Sensory responses, even in primary sensory areas, are deeply influenced by the previous history of stimulation. Thus,repetitive stimulation often induces adaptation to the stimulus and a decreased response. On the other hand, in anawake animal, previous exposure to stimuli may vary how that stimulus is experienced: it can be attended, feared, highlyexpected or neglected according to its acquired meaning. To what extent does this higher processing of a simple stimulusalter the responses of single-neuron primary sensory cortices? In order to answer this question and to characterizehow repetitive stimulation shapes auditory cortical responses, we recorded from A1 and A2 in awake behavingrats. Recordings were obtained with chronically implanted tetrodes that allowed us to identify the recordings of up to 5-6single units simultaneously. To study adaptation, two identical white noise stimuli were delivered with different intervalsranging from 50 ms to 8 s. Single neuron's recording revealed that the response to a sound is influenced by sounds deliveredeven seconds earlier, the second one usually yielding a weaker response (see Figure 1). Adaptation occurred mainlyin two time scales: one of hundreds of ms and another one of seconds (<10 s), the time course of adaptation and its recovery being determined by the intensity of the first stimulus of the pair. Our results suggest that adaptation to repetitivestimulation does not differ from the one that can be evoked with similar protocols in other preparations of the auditorycortex, therefore it seems to depend strictly on bottom-up mechanisms. On the other side, we have observed modulationof auditory responses depending on the preceding sequence of sounds and thus the expectancy of certain stimuli.We hypothesize that the activation of top-down mechanisms is underlying this phenomenon.


39th Annual European Brain and Behaviour Society Abstracts
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2366049&req=5

Mentions: Sensory responses, even in primary sensory areas, are deeply influenced by the previous history of stimulation. Thus,repetitive stimulation often induces adaptation to the stimulus and a decreased response. On the other hand, in anawake animal, previous exposure to stimuli may vary how that stimulus is experienced: it can be attended, feared, highlyexpected or neglected according to its acquired meaning. To what extent does this higher processing of a simple stimulusalter the responses of single-neuron primary sensory cortices? In order to answer this question and to characterizehow repetitive stimulation shapes auditory cortical responses, we recorded from A1 and A2 in awake behavingrats. Recordings were obtained with chronically implanted tetrodes that allowed us to identify the recordings of up to 5-6single units simultaneously. To study adaptation, two identical white noise stimuli were delivered with different intervalsranging from 50 ms to 8 s. Single neuron's recording revealed that the response to a sound is influenced by sounds deliveredeven seconds earlier, the second one usually yielding a weaker response (see Figure 1). Adaptation occurred mainlyin two time scales: one of hundreds of ms and another one of seconds (<10 s), the time course of adaptation and its recovery being determined by the intensity of the first stimulus of the pair. Our results suggest that adaptation to repetitivestimulation does not differ from the one that can be evoked with similar protocols in other preparations of the auditorycortex, therefore it seems to depend strictly on bottom-up mechanisms. On the other side, we have observed modulationof auditory responses depending on the preceding sequence of sounds and thus the expectancy of certain stimuli.We hypothesize that the activation of top-down mechanisms is underlying this phenomenon.

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The EUROPEAN BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR SOCIETY has held its 39th Annual General Meeting in Trieste, in the campus next tothe Miramare castle and its park, co-hosted by SISSA, the International School for Advanced Studies, and ICTP, the Abdus SalamInternational Centre for Theoretical Physics. Alessandro Treves (SISSA) was the head and inspiration of the Local Organizingcommittee, supported by P. Battaglini, L. Chelazzi, M. Diamond and G. Vallortigara. All approaches relating brain and behaviourwere represented at the meeting, which aimed to further expand the wide spectrum of previous EBBS AGMs, and to bring togetherintegrative, system, cognitive, computational neuroscientists.

See also the societies home page: http://www.ebbs-science.org/.

No MeSH data available.