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Motives for (not) participating in a lifestyle intervention trial.

Lakerveld J, Ijzelenberg W, van Tulder MW, Hellemans IM, Rauwerda JA, van Rossum AC, Seidell JC - BMC Med Res Methodol (2008)

Bottom Line: No statistically significant differences were found in health measures and behavioral variables.The main barriers reported by non-participants were financial arguments and time investment.ISRCTN69776211.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Practice, EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Center, v,d, Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. j.lakerveld@vumc.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: Non-participants can have a considerable influence on the external validity of a study. Therefore, we assessed the socio-demographic, health-related, and lifestyle behavioral differences between participants and non-participants in a comprehensive CVD lifestyle intervention trial, and explored the motives and barriers underlying the decision to participate or not.

Methods: We collected data on participants (n = 50) and non-participants (n = 50) who were eligible for inclusion in a comprehensive CVD lifestyle interventional trial. Questionnaires and a hospital patient records database were used to assess socio-demographic, health-related and lifestyle behavioral variables. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to describe the relationship between explanatory variables and study participation. Furthermore, motives and barriers that underlie study participation were investigated by means of questionnaires.

Results: Participants were younger, single, had a higher level of education and were employed. No statistically significant differences were found in health measures and behavioral variables. The motives for participation that were most frequently reported were: the perception of being unhealthy and willingness to change their lifestyle. The main barriers reported by non-participants were financial arguments and time investment.

Conclusion: The differences between participants and non-participants in a lifestyle intervention trial are in mainly demographic factors. The participants consent in order to alter their lifestyle, and/or because they want to improve their health. To minimize non-participation, it is recommended that access to a lifestyle intervention program should be easy and cause no financial restraints.

Trial registration: ISRCTN69776211.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart of patient recruitment in the ALANT Study and in the non-participant survey.
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Figure 1: Flow chart of patient recruitment in the ALANT Study and in the non-participant survey.

Mentions: At the VU University in Amsterdam we are conducting the ALANT study (Activity, Lifestyle And Nutritional Therapy-study) on the cost-effectiveness of a multifactorial comprehensive lifestyle intervention program for CVD patients. The program has already been described in more detail in an intervention study with no control group [12]. Figure 1 is a flow chart of patient recruitment for the ALANT study and the present survey. A total of 15,343 patients were screened for the ALANT study, 877 of whom were assessed by the medical specialists as eligible for participation in the study. The other patients did not meet the inclusion criteria, or did not show up for their appointment, or were not assessed by the medical specialists. A total of 729 (83%) of the 877 eligible patients decided not to participate. We therefore evaluated the socio-demographic, health-related, and lifestyle behavioral differences between participants and non-participants in this trial. Motivational aspects involved in trial participation and barriers for participation were also evaluated in order to enable us to make recommendations for successful patient recruitment in the future.


Motives for (not) participating in a lifestyle intervention trial.

Lakerveld J, Ijzelenberg W, van Tulder MW, Hellemans IM, Rauwerda JA, van Rossum AC, Seidell JC - BMC Med Res Methodol (2008)

Flow chart of patient recruitment in the ALANT Study and in the non-participant survey.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2365955&req=5

Figure 1: Flow chart of patient recruitment in the ALANT Study and in the non-participant survey.
Mentions: At the VU University in Amsterdam we are conducting the ALANT study (Activity, Lifestyle And Nutritional Therapy-study) on the cost-effectiveness of a multifactorial comprehensive lifestyle intervention program for CVD patients. The program has already been described in more detail in an intervention study with no control group [12]. Figure 1 is a flow chart of patient recruitment for the ALANT study and the present survey. A total of 15,343 patients were screened for the ALANT study, 877 of whom were assessed by the medical specialists as eligible for participation in the study. The other patients did not meet the inclusion criteria, or did not show up for their appointment, or were not assessed by the medical specialists. A total of 729 (83%) of the 877 eligible patients decided not to participate. We therefore evaluated the socio-demographic, health-related, and lifestyle behavioral differences between participants and non-participants in this trial. Motivational aspects involved in trial participation and barriers for participation were also evaluated in order to enable us to make recommendations for successful patient recruitment in the future.

Bottom Line: No statistically significant differences were found in health measures and behavioral variables.The main barriers reported by non-participants were financial arguments and time investment.ISRCTN69776211.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Practice, EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Center, v,d, Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. j.lakerveld@vumc.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: Non-participants can have a considerable influence on the external validity of a study. Therefore, we assessed the socio-demographic, health-related, and lifestyle behavioral differences between participants and non-participants in a comprehensive CVD lifestyle intervention trial, and explored the motives and barriers underlying the decision to participate or not.

Methods: We collected data on participants (n = 50) and non-participants (n = 50) who were eligible for inclusion in a comprehensive CVD lifestyle interventional trial. Questionnaires and a hospital patient records database were used to assess socio-demographic, health-related and lifestyle behavioral variables. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to describe the relationship between explanatory variables and study participation. Furthermore, motives and barriers that underlie study participation were investigated by means of questionnaires.

Results: Participants were younger, single, had a higher level of education and were employed. No statistically significant differences were found in health measures and behavioral variables. The motives for participation that were most frequently reported were: the perception of being unhealthy and willingness to change their lifestyle. The main barriers reported by non-participants were financial arguments and time investment.

Conclusion: The differences between participants and non-participants in a lifestyle intervention trial are in mainly demographic factors. The participants consent in order to alter their lifestyle, and/or because they want to improve their health. To minimize non-participation, it is recommended that access to a lifestyle intervention program should be easy and cause no financial restraints.

Trial registration: ISRCTN69776211.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus