Limits...
Chemical and physical properties of some saline lakes in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Bowman JS, Sachs JP - Saline Syst. (2008)

Bottom Line: Many of these lakes are ecologically and economically significant to the Great Plains Region.The wide range of salinities found across a small geographic area makes the Canadian saline lakes region ideal for testing salinity proxies.This acceleration has ecological implications for the migratory bird species found within the Redberry Important Bird Area.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-5351, USA. bowmanjs@u.washington.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: The Northern Great Plains of Canada are home to numerous permanent and ephemeral athalassohaline lakes. These lakes display a wide range of ion compositions, salinities, stratification patterns, and ecosystems. Many of these lakes are ecologically and economically significant to the Great Plains Region. A survey of the physical characteristics and chemistry of 19 lakes was carried out to assess their suitability for testing new tools for determining past salinity from the sediment record.

Results: Data on total dissolved solids (TDS), specific conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and pH were measured in June, 2007. A comparison of these data with past measurements indicates that salinity is declining at Little Manitou and Big Quill Lakes in the province of Saskatchewan. However salinity is rising at other lakes in the region, including Redberry and Manito Lakes.

Conclusion: The wide range of salinities found across a small geographic area makes the Canadian saline lakes region ideal for testing salinity proxies. A nonlinear increase in salinity at Redberry Lake is likely influenced by its morphometry. This acceleration has ecological implications for the migratory bird species found within the Redberry Important Bird Area.

No MeSH data available.


Annual precipitation and evapotranspiration for Redberry Lake. Relatively constant rates of precipitation and evapotranspiration (calculated with a modified Thornwaite equation [40]) are shown for Redberry Lake. This suggests a mechanism other than climate for the nonlinear increase in salinity at Redberry.
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Figure 11: Annual precipitation and evapotranspiration for Redberry Lake. Relatively constant rates of precipitation and evapotranspiration (calculated with a modified Thornwaite equation [40]) are shown for Redberry Lake. This suggests a mechanism other than climate for the nonlinear increase in salinity at Redberry.

Mentions: Fig. 11 shows annual total precipitation (rain and snow) from 1925 to 2006 for the Saskatoon weather station. Data for the years 1930 and 1941 are not available. A linear trend line for these annual precipitation totals has a slope of -0.347 mm yr-1, indicating that precipitation totals have remained relatively constant since 1930. The Redberry Lake catchment is estimated to be 1180 km2 [29]. For a drainage this size a deficit of 0.347 mm of water in a given year results in 413 m3 less water available to dilute the terminal basin every year, a small fraction of the estimated 1999 lake volume of 2.53 × 108 m3 (1.63 × 10-6 % of lake volume). Fig. 11 also shows annual estimated evapotranspiration determined by a modified Thornwaite Equation [40]. This equation does not take into account the strong evaporative effects of wind direction and speed in a prairie environment. However diurnal and annual variations in wind direction and speed have remained constant since they were first recorded in 1957 [39]. The steady average rate of evapotranspiration suggests that the nonlinear increase in salinity shown in Fig. 10 does not result from a decadal-scale shift in climate. Another factor, such as basin morphology may be responsible.


Chemical and physical properties of some saline lakes in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Bowman JS, Sachs JP - Saline Syst. (2008)

Annual precipitation and evapotranspiration for Redberry Lake. Relatively constant rates of precipitation and evapotranspiration (calculated with a modified Thornwaite equation [40]) are shown for Redberry Lake. This suggests a mechanism other than climate for the nonlinear increase in salinity at Redberry.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2365950&req=5

Figure 11: Annual precipitation and evapotranspiration for Redberry Lake. Relatively constant rates of precipitation and evapotranspiration (calculated with a modified Thornwaite equation [40]) are shown for Redberry Lake. This suggests a mechanism other than climate for the nonlinear increase in salinity at Redberry.
Mentions: Fig. 11 shows annual total precipitation (rain and snow) from 1925 to 2006 for the Saskatoon weather station. Data for the years 1930 and 1941 are not available. A linear trend line for these annual precipitation totals has a slope of -0.347 mm yr-1, indicating that precipitation totals have remained relatively constant since 1930. The Redberry Lake catchment is estimated to be 1180 km2 [29]. For a drainage this size a deficit of 0.347 mm of water in a given year results in 413 m3 less water available to dilute the terminal basin every year, a small fraction of the estimated 1999 lake volume of 2.53 × 108 m3 (1.63 × 10-6 % of lake volume). Fig. 11 also shows annual estimated evapotranspiration determined by a modified Thornwaite Equation [40]. This equation does not take into account the strong evaporative effects of wind direction and speed in a prairie environment. However diurnal and annual variations in wind direction and speed have remained constant since they were first recorded in 1957 [39]. The steady average rate of evapotranspiration suggests that the nonlinear increase in salinity shown in Fig. 10 does not result from a decadal-scale shift in climate. Another factor, such as basin morphology may be responsible.

Bottom Line: Many of these lakes are ecologically and economically significant to the Great Plains Region.The wide range of salinities found across a small geographic area makes the Canadian saline lakes region ideal for testing salinity proxies.This acceleration has ecological implications for the migratory bird species found within the Redberry Important Bird Area.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-5351, USA. bowmanjs@u.washington.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: The Northern Great Plains of Canada are home to numerous permanent and ephemeral athalassohaline lakes. These lakes display a wide range of ion compositions, salinities, stratification patterns, and ecosystems. Many of these lakes are ecologically and economically significant to the Great Plains Region. A survey of the physical characteristics and chemistry of 19 lakes was carried out to assess their suitability for testing new tools for determining past salinity from the sediment record.

Results: Data on total dissolved solids (TDS), specific conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and pH were measured in June, 2007. A comparison of these data with past measurements indicates that salinity is declining at Little Manitou and Big Quill Lakes in the province of Saskatchewan. However salinity is rising at other lakes in the region, including Redberry and Manito Lakes.

Conclusion: The wide range of salinities found across a small geographic area makes the Canadian saline lakes region ideal for testing salinity proxies. A nonlinear increase in salinity at Redberry Lake is likely influenced by its morphometry. This acceleration has ecological implications for the migratory bird species found within the Redberry Important Bird Area.

No MeSH data available.