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Keck Foundation Biotechnology Resource Laboratory, Yale University.

Stone KL, Bjornson RD, Blasko GG, Bruce C, Cofrancesco R, Carriero NJ, Colangelo CM, Crawford JK, Crawford JM, daSilva NC, Deluca JD, Elliott JI, Elliott MM, Flory PJ, Folta-Stogniew EJ, Gulcicek E, Kong Y, Lam TT, Lee JY, Lin A, LoPresti MB, Mane SM, McMurray WJ, Tikhonova IR, Westman S, Williams NA, Wu TL, Hongyu Z, Williams KR - Yale J Biol Med (2007)

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Affiliation: Keck Foundation Biotechnology Resource Laboratory, Yale University, 300 George Street, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

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The W.M... Keck Foundation Biotechnology Resource Laboratory began in 1980, when its precursor (the Protein Chemistry Facility, PCF) was founded by Drs... Today, the Keck Lab provides more than 175 state-of-the-art genomic, proteomic, biostatistical, bioinformatics, and high performance computing technologies to hundreds of Yale and non-Yale investigators whose research programs otherwise may not benefit from the highly sophisticated and expensive instrumentation upon which biological and biomedical research is increasingly dependent... The experience of spending two years manually sequencing peptides that could have been sequenced “automatically” on a nearby instrument that operated unattended and continuously once the sample and reagents were loaded forever imbued in Williams the desire to bring biotechnology instrumentation within equal and sufficient access of all Yale investigators... According to a 2006 proteomics survey by Keck staff of 25 core laboratories at institutions similar to Yale or having large biotechnology cores, the Keck Laboratory provides competitive service charges and a very wide range of technologies... The median service charge for the 20 proteomics technologies surveyed was $128 for the Keck Lab as compared to $139 for all 25 core labs; only the Keck Lab offered all 20 services surveyed... While the Keck Laboratory was built on the foundation provided by established proteomics technologies (e.g., amino acid analysis), it expanded to include established genomics technologies (e.g., oligo synthesis) and several emerging technologies... As illustrated in Figure 2 for a DNA-binding dependent dimerization of FIR protein, binding constants are determined using isothermal calorimetry (ITC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), or an SLM 8000C spectrofluorometer; kinetics using stopped-flow and SPR; and the enthalpy and entropy of binding reactions using ITC — which is an almost universal technology for studying macromolecular interactions that is based on the heat that interactions give off or take up upon complex formation... Thus, this approach does not require labeling of the interacting species... The Keck Lab is sometimes asked why it offers technologies such as “conventional” DNA sequencing and oligonucleotide synthesis, which are offered at lower fees by some commercial laboratories... The simple answer goes back to the foundation upon which the Keck Lab was built: to meet the needs of the Yale scientific community... In fiscal year 2007, the Keck Lab carried out 204,024 DNA sequencing analyses with > 88 percent of the requests coming from 376 Yale investigators... It seems likely that the increasing demand for this Keck service results from faster turnaround, higher quality data, higher success rate, more personalized service, more responsive staff, and more extensive assistance with analysis of multiple datasets, compared with the services provided by commercial DNA sequencing companies... Yale ITS provides systems administration and computer scientists in the Keck HPC Resource work with researchers to optimize codes, develop parallel variants, explore new formulations, and support new genomic (e.g., Solexa DNA sequencing) and proteomic technologies as they are brought online by the Keck and other laboratories... The Yale Microarray Center for Research on the Nervous System was established in 2005 as one of four centers to provide DNA microarray services at lower cost to approximately 10,000 neuroscientists funded by 15 NIH Blueprint Institutes, thus supporting a broad range of research, and is located primarily within the Keck Lab.

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“Conventional” DNA sequencing reactions carried out from fiscal year 2001-2007 by the Keck DNA Sequencing Resource. The Yale University fiscal year extends from July 1 through June 30.
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Figure 4: “Conventional” DNA sequencing reactions carried out from fiscal year 2001-2007 by the Keck DNA Sequencing Resource. The Yale University fiscal year extends from July 1 through June 30.

Mentions: The Keck Lab is sometimes asked why it offers technologies such as “conventional” DNA sequencing and oligonucleotide synthesis, which are offered at lower fees by some commercial laboratories. The simple answer goes back to the foundation upon which the Keck Lab was built: to meet the needs of the Yale scientific community. Over the last seven years, the demand for DNA sequencing has increased about 18 percent annually (Figure 4). In fiscal year 2007, the Keck Lab carried out 204,024 DNA sequencing analyses with > 88 percent of the requests coming from 376 Yale investigators. It seems likely that the increasing demand for this Keck service results from faster turnaround, higher quality data, higher success rate, more personalized service, more responsive staff, and more extensive assistance with analysis of multiple datasets, compared with the services provided by commercial DNA sequencing companies. Similarly, in fiscal year 2007, the Keck Lab synthesized 32,051 custom oligonucleotides, with > 86 percent of these requests coming from Yale, which represented a 10 percent increase from 2006. By using three overlapping staff shifts, this Keck Resource usually is able to provide < 24 hour turnaround for unpurified, 40 nanomole DNA oligos that are < 60-mers. Another factor contributing to the increased use may be the very broad range of modified oligonucleotides (many of which may not be available commercially) that have been synthesized successfully by this Resource. In the case of state-of-the-art biotechnologies, such as the phosphoproteome profiling technology recently introduced by the Keck MS/proteomics Resource, we have not been able to find any commercial vendor that provides a comparable technology. Other biotechnologies (e.g., the SEC/laser light scattering technology from the Biophysics Resource) appear to be more expensive from commercial vendors than from the Keck Lab.


Keck Foundation Biotechnology Resource Laboratory, Yale University.

Stone KL, Bjornson RD, Blasko GG, Bruce C, Cofrancesco R, Carriero NJ, Colangelo CM, Crawford JK, Crawford JM, daSilva NC, Deluca JD, Elliott JI, Elliott MM, Flory PJ, Folta-Stogniew EJ, Gulcicek E, Kong Y, Lam TT, Lee JY, Lin A, LoPresti MB, Mane SM, McMurray WJ, Tikhonova IR, Westman S, Williams NA, Wu TL, Hongyu Z, Williams KR - Yale J Biol Med (2007)

“Conventional” DNA sequencing reactions carried out from fiscal year 2001-2007 by the Keck DNA Sequencing Resource. The Yale University fiscal year extends from July 1 through June 30.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2347368&req=5

Figure 4: “Conventional” DNA sequencing reactions carried out from fiscal year 2001-2007 by the Keck DNA Sequencing Resource. The Yale University fiscal year extends from July 1 through June 30.
Mentions: The Keck Lab is sometimes asked why it offers technologies such as “conventional” DNA sequencing and oligonucleotide synthesis, which are offered at lower fees by some commercial laboratories. The simple answer goes back to the foundation upon which the Keck Lab was built: to meet the needs of the Yale scientific community. Over the last seven years, the demand for DNA sequencing has increased about 18 percent annually (Figure 4). In fiscal year 2007, the Keck Lab carried out 204,024 DNA sequencing analyses with > 88 percent of the requests coming from 376 Yale investigators. It seems likely that the increasing demand for this Keck service results from faster turnaround, higher quality data, higher success rate, more personalized service, more responsive staff, and more extensive assistance with analysis of multiple datasets, compared with the services provided by commercial DNA sequencing companies. Similarly, in fiscal year 2007, the Keck Lab synthesized 32,051 custom oligonucleotides, with > 86 percent of these requests coming from Yale, which represented a 10 percent increase from 2006. By using three overlapping staff shifts, this Keck Resource usually is able to provide < 24 hour turnaround for unpurified, 40 nanomole DNA oligos that are < 60-mers. Another factor contributing to the increased use may be the very broad range of modified oligonucleotides (many of which may not be available commercially) that have been synthesized successfully by this Resource. In the case of state-of-the-art biotechnologies, such as the phosphoproteome profiling technology recently introduced by the Keck MS/proteomics Resource, we have not been able to find any commercial vendor that provides a comparable technology. Other biotechnologies (e.g., the SEC/laser light scattering technology from the Biophysics Resource) appear to be more expensive from commercial vendors than from the Keck Lab.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Keck Foundation Biotechnology Resource Laboratory, Yale University, 300 George Street, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The W.M... Keck Foundation Biotechnology Resource Laboratory began in 1980, when its precursor (the Protein Chemistry Facility, PCF) was founded by Drs... Today, the Keck Lab provides more than 175 state-of-the-art genomic, proteomic, biostatistical, bioinformatics, and high performance computing technologies to hundreds of Yale and non-Yale investigators whose research programs otherwise may not benefit from the highly sophisticated and expensive instrumentation upon which biological and biomedical research is increasingly dependent... The experience of spending two years manually sequencing peptides that could have been sequenced “automatically” on a nearby instrument that operated unattended and continuously once the sample and reagents were loaded forever imbued in Williams the desire to bring biotechnology instrumentation within equal and sufficient access of all Yale investigators... According to a 2006 proteomics survey by Keck staff of 25 core laboratories at institutions similar to Yale or having large biotechnology cores, the Keck Laboratory provides competitive service charges and a very wide range of technologies... The median service charge for the 20 proteomics technologies surveyed was $128 for the Keck Lab as compared to $139 for all 25 core labs; only the Keck Lab offered all 20 services surveyed... While the Keck Laboratory was built on the foundation provided by established proteomics technologies (e.g., amino acid analysis), it expanded to include established genomics technologies (e.g., oligo synthesis) and several emerging technologies... As illustrated in Figure 2 for a DNA-binding dependent dimerization of FIR protein, binding constants are determined using isothermal calorimetry (ITC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), or an SLM 8000C spectrofluorometer; kinetics using stopped-flow and SPR; and the enthalpy and entropy of binding reactions using ITC — which is an almost universal technology for studying macromolecular interactions that is based on the heat that interactions give off or take up upon complex formation... Thus, this approach does not require labeling of the interacting species... The Keck Lab is sometimes asked why it offers technologies such as “conventional” DNA sequencing and oligonucleotide synthesis, which are offered at lower fees by some commercial laboratories... The simple answer goes back to the foundation upon which the Keck Lab was built: to meet the needs of the Yale scientific community... In fiscal year 2007, the Keck Lab carried out 204,024 DNA sequencing analyses with > 88 percent of the requests coming from 376 Yale investigators... It seems likely that the increasing demand for this Keck service results from faster turnaround, higher quality data, higher success rate, more personalized service, more responsive staff, and more extensive assistance with analysis of multiple datasets, compared with the services provided by commercial DNA sequencing companies... Yale ITS provides systems administration and computer scientists in the Keck HPC Resource work with researchers to optimize codes, develop parallel variants, explore new formulations, and support new genomic (e.g., Solexa DNA sequencing) and proteomic technologies as they are brought online by the Keck and other laboratories... The Yale Microarray Center for Research on the Nervous System was established in 2005 as one of four centers to provide DNA microarray services at lower cost to approximately 10,000 neuroscientists funded by 15 NIH Blueprint Institutes, thus supporting a broad range of research, and is located primarily within the Keck Lab.

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