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Why some people prefer pickle juice: the research of Dr. Richard P. Lifton.

Gayed PM - Yale J Biol Med (2007)

Bottom Line: In this essay, the author interviews Dr. Richard P.Lifton and examines the use of genomics throughout his studies on the molecular pathophysiology of hypertensive and hypotensive diseases.To date, Dr. Lifton has identified 10 different gene mutations that result in severe hypertension and another 10 that result in severe hypotension.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Yale University School of Medicine, USA.

ABSTRACT
In this essay, the author interviews Dr. Richard P. Lifton and examines the use of genomics throughout his studies on the molecular pathophysiology of hypertensive and hypotensive diseases. To date, Dr. Lifton has identified 10 different gene mutations that result in severe hypertension and another 10 that result in severe hypotension.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The accepted genetic map for the region associated with pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1. (From the NCBI Map Viewer, chromosomal region 4q31.1)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: The accepted genetic map for the region associated with pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1. (From the NCBI Map Viewer, chromosomal region 4q31.1)

Mentions: Now scientists like Lifton use markers unique to a monogenic disease to locate, clone, and study a disease gene. Genetic markers themselves first can be identified by collecting tissue samples from healthy and afflicted family members and then analyzing those samples for specific sequence patterns, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms. Markers in proximity to a disease gene are inherited with it, while distant markers show weak or no co-inheritance with the gene. Genetic maps display this information as representations of chromosomes, their genes, and the relative distances between specific gene loci (Figure 1). Presumably, affected members of a family share the same mutation and, thus, exhibit a shared genetic pattern that can be elucidated by sequencing methods. Using sequenced DNA fragments, geneticists can search the Human Genome Project to identify and home in on candidate regions likely to harbor the disease gene of interest.


Why some people prefer pickle juice: the research of Dr. Richard P. Lifton.

Gayed PM - Yale J Biol Med (2007)

The accepted genetic map for the region associated with pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1. (From the NCBI Map Viewer, chromosomal region 4q31.1)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2347362&req=5

Figure 1: The accepted genetic map for the region associated with pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1. (From the NCBI Map Viewer, chromosomal region 4q31.1)
Mentions: Now scientists like Lifton use markers unique to a monogenic disease to locate, clone, and study a disease gene. Genetic markers themselves first can be identified by collecting tissue samples from healthy and afflicted family members and then analyzing those samples for specific sequence patterns, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms. Markers in proximity to a disease gene are inherited with it, while distant markers show weak or no co-inheritance with the gene. Genetic maps display this information as representations of chromosomes, their genes, and the relative distances between specific gene loci (Figure 1). Presumably, affected members of a family share the same mutation and, thus, exhibit a shared genetic pattern that can be elucidated by sequencing methods. Using sequenced DNA fragments, geneticists can search the Human Genome Project to identify and home in on candidate regions likely to harbor the disease gene of interest.

Bottom Line: In this essay, the author interviews Dr. Richard P.Lifton and examines the use of genomics throughout his studies on the molecular pathophysiology of hypertensive and hypotensive diseases.To date, Dr. Lifton has identified 10 different gene mutations that result in severe hypertension and another 10 that result in severe hypotension.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Yale University School of Medicine, USA.

ABSTRACT
In this essay, the author interviews Dr. Richard P. Lifton and examines the use of genomics throughout his studies on the molecular pathophysiology of hypertensive and hypotensive diseases. To date, Dr. Lifton has identified 10 different gene mutations that result in severe hypertension and another 10 that result in severe hypotension.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus