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Eye-hand coordination during manual object transport with the affected and less affected hand in adolescents with hemiparetic cerebral palsy.

Verrel J, Bekkering H, Steenbergen B - Exp Brain Res (2008)

Bottom Line: Using an object prehension and transport task, we addressed two hypotheses, motivated by the question whether early brain damage and the ensuing limitations of motor activity lead to general and/or effector-specific effects in visuomotor control of manual actions.We hypothesized that individuals with hemiparetic CP would more closely visually monitor actions with their affected hand, compared to both their less affected hand and to control participants without a sensorimotor impairment.Collectively, these findings are the first to directly show that individuals with hemiparetic CP adapt eye-hand coordination to the specific constraints of the moving limb, presumably to compensate for sensorimotor deficits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nijmegen Institute for Cognition and Information, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In the present study we investigated eye-hand coordination in adolescents with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP) and neurologically healthy controls. Using an object prehension and transport task, we addressed two hypotheses, motivated by the question whether early brain damage and the ensuing limitations of motor activity lead to general and/or effector-specific effects in visuomotor control of manual actions. We hypothesized that individuals with hemiparetic CP would more closely visually monitor actions with their affected hand, compared to both their less affected hand and to control participants without a sensorimotor impairment. A second, more speculative hypothesis was that, in relation to previously established deficits in prospective action control in individuals with hemiparetic CP, gaze patterns might be less anticipatory in general, also during actions performed with the less affected hand. Analysis of the gaze and hand movement data revealed the increased visual monitoring of participants with CP when using their affected hand at the beginning as well as during object transport. In contrast, no general deficit in anticipatory gaze control in the participants with hemiparetic CP could be observed. Collectively, these findings are the first to directly show that individuals with hemiparetic CP adapt eye-hand coordination to the specific constraints of the moving limb, presumably to compensate for sensorimotor deficits.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental setup (top view). The participant is seated at the table, with the right hand resting at the starting position. Positions of objects (blue and green cylinder, 6 cm in height, 3 cm in diameter, with an enlarged stabilizing basis of 6 cm in diameter), target regions (blue and green disc, 10 cm in diameter, contralateral to the corresponding object), optional obstacle (cylinder, 15 cm in height, 6 cm in diameter), and the pre-trial fixation target (red ball 2 cm in diameter mounted on a frame at about eye height) are shown. The experimenter was seated at a separate desk facing the participant. The dashed line represents the object transport movement from object to target region in a “blue” trial. The x- and z-axis of the Optotrak system were approximately aligned to the axes indicated here, the y-axis was orthogonal to both (vertical axis)
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Fig1: Experimental setup (top view). The participant is seated at the table, with the right hand resting at the starting position. Positions of objects (blue and green cylinder, 6 cm in height, 3 cm in diameter, with an enlarged stabilizing basis of 6 cm in diameter), target regions (blue and green disc, 10 cm in diameter, contralateral to the corresponding object), optional obstacle (cylinder, 15 cm in height, 6 cm in diameter), and the pre-trial fixation target (red ball 2 cm in diameter mounted on a frame at about eye height) are shown. The experimenter was seated at a separate desk facing the participant. The dashed line represents the object transport movement from object to target region in a “blue” trial. The x- and z-axis of the Optotrak system were approximately aligned to the axes indicated here, the y-axis was orthogonal to both (vertical axis)

Mentions: The experimental setup is depicted in Fig. 1. Participants were comfortably seated on a chair approximately centered at the midline of the table, which constituted the working region for the experiment. Two objects (blue and green), two target regions, and an optional obstacle were placed on the table, as well as a fixation target (see Fig. 1 and caption for details). Two loudspeakers, placed below the table, were used to verbally instruct the participant through a pre-recorded voice. The experimenter sat facing the participant at a separate table. From this position he was able to supervise the experiment by instructing the participant, starting and terminating the trials, and monitoring participants’ performance (directly and via a computer monitor that showed the eye movement recording system’s output in real time).Fig. 1


Eye-hand coordination during manual object transport with the affected and less affected hand in adolescents with hemiparetic cerebral palsy.

Verrel J, Bekkering H, Steenbergen B - Exp Brain Res (2008)

Experimental setup (top view). The participant is seated at the table, with the right hand resting at the starting position. Positions of objects (blue and green cylinder, 6 cm in height, 3 cm in diameter, with an enlarged stabilizing basis of 6 cm in diameter), target regions (blue and green disc, 10 cm in diameter, contralateral to the corresponding object), optional obstacle (cylinder, 15 cm in height, 6 cm in diameter), and the pre-trial fixation target (red ball 2 cm in diameter mounted on a frame at about eye height) are shown. The experimenter was seated at a separate desk facing the participant. The dashed line represents the object transport movement from object to target region in a “blue” trial. The x- and z-axis of the Optotrak system were approximately aligned to the axes indicated here, the y-axis was orthogonal to both (vertical axis)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2315690&req=5

Fig1: Experimental setup (top view). The participant is seated at the table, with the right hand resting at the starting position. Positions of objects (blue and green cylinder, 6 cm in height, 3 cm in diameter, with an enlarged stabilizing basis of 6 cm in diameter), target regions (blue and green disc, 10 cm in diameter, contralateral to the corresponding object), optional obstacle (cylinder, 15 cm in height, 6 cm in diameter), and the pre-trial fixation target (red ball 2 cm in diameter mounted on a frame at about eye height) are shown. The experimenter was seated at a separate desk facing the participant. The dashed line represents the object transport movement from object to target region in a “blue” trial. The x- and z-axis of the Optotrak system were approximately aligned to the axes indicated here, the y-axis was orthogonal to both (vertical axis)
Mentions: The experimental setup is depicted in Fig. 1. Participants were comfortably seated on a chair approximately centered at the midline of the table, which constituted the working region for the experiment. Two objects (blue and green), two target regions, and an optional obstacle were placed on the table, as well as a fixation target (see Fig. 1 and caption for details). Two loudspeakers, placed below the table, were used to verbally instruct the participant through a pre-recorded voice. The experimenter sat facing the participant at a separate table. From this position he was able to supervise the experiment by instructing the participant, starting and terminating the trials, and monitoring participants’ performance (directly and via a computer monitor that showed the eye movement recording system’s output in real time).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Using an object prehension and transport task, we addressed two hypotheses, motivated by the question whether early brain damage and the ensuing limitations of motor activity lead to general and/or effector-specific effects in visuomotor control of manual actions.We hypothesized that individuals with hemiparetic CP would more closely visually monitor actions with their affected hand, compared to both their less affected hand and to control participants without a sensorimotor impairment.Collectively, these findings are the first to directly show that individuals with hemiparetic CP adapt eye-hand coordination to the specific constraints of the moving limb, presumably to compensate for sensorimotor deficits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nijmegen Institute for Cognition and Information, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In the present study we investigated eye-hand coordination in adolescents with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP) and neurologically healthy controls. Using an object prehension and transport task, we addressed two hypotheses, motivated by the question whether early brain damage and the ensuing limitations of motor activity lead to general and/or effector-specific effects in visuomotor control of manual actions. We hypothesized that individuals with hemiparetic CP would more closely visually monitor actions with their affected hand, compared to both their less affected hand and to control participants without a sensorimotor impairment. A second, more speculative hypothesis was that, in relation to previously established deficits in prospective action control in individuals with hemiparetic CP, gaze patterns might be less anticipatory in general, also during actions performed with the less affected hand. Analysis of the gaze and hand movement data revealed the increased visual monitoring of participants with CP when using their affected hand at the beginning as well as during object transport. In contrast, no general deficit in anticipatory gaze control in the participants with hemiparetic CP could be observed. Collectively, these findings are the first to directly show that individuals with hemiparetic CP adapt eye-hand coordination to the specific constraints of the moving limb, presumably to compensate for sensorimotor deficits.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus